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mapledale

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I submitted one abstract (case report) for the CAP2008, which will be held on the end of September. Any one knows how difficult to get the abstract be accepted for the conference? Thanks
 

Matte Kudesai

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I submitted one abstract (case report) for the CAP2008, which will be held on the end of September. Any one knows how difficult to get the abstract be accepted for the conference? Thanks

This is probably the least discriminating conference in all of pathology.
You should have no problem attending with something slightly better than half a55ed.
 

BamaAlum

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This is probably the least discriminating conference in all of pathology.
You should have no problem attending with something slightly better than half a55ed.

I don't know...ASCP is pretty easy too, plus no one comes to the poster sessions, unlike USCAP where you stand there forever and wait for some attending from Belgium to tell you that your work sux and is irrelevant.
 
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docbiohazard

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So... you've got CAP meetings, and USCAP meetings... then there's also ASIP (part of the big FASEB meeting)... just out of curiosity, at least between CAP and USCAP, which one is better attended by residents or higher yield? Do people usually attend one or the other, or both?

BH
 

Matte Kudesai

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So... you've got CAP meetings, and USCAP meetings... then there's also ASIP (part of the big FASEB meeting)... just out of curiosity, at least between CAP and USCAP, which one is better attended by residents or higher yield? Do people usually attend one or the other, or both?BH

USCAP is probably the most "research" oriented meeting.
It depends on your goals. (that does not mean much in the real world)

the quality of the meetings in terms of peer review and scrutiny (in terms of what is accepted) is
1) USCAP
2) ASCP
3) CAP

In terms of the real impact of any of these meetings on anything substantial (compared to ASCO, AACR, ASIP, Molecular Biology etc) these are low level meetings. (no offense just reality)

Why.... who knows... probably the same reason why the highest impact factor pathology journals hover at around a 6...

Nothing to be proud of since pathologists are supposed to be the interface between the bench and the bedside.

The aforementioned (USCAP etc)meetings are good for padding resume's socializing, and schmoozing to secure fellowships though.

CAP is probably the most resident kumbaya time followed by ASCP and then USCAP...
 

yaah

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USCAP has sort of three phases
1) (weekend) - Companion society meetings and get togethers. Usually each one puts on a series of lectures talking about recent advances in their field.
2) (early week) - abstracts, posters mostly
3) (end of week) - educational stuff like short courses

They have very different feels - by the time #3 rolls around a lot of the big names have left (unless they are presenting) and the short courses are very educational, in general. I think a lot of residents don't take advantage of the companion society meetings as much as they should, usually lots of lectures on hot topics or controversial areas or whatever. The short courses at the end are more bread and butter, practical pathology, aimed more at practicing pathologists fulfilling their CME.

I would agree that oftentimes not a lot of groundbreaking stuff comes out at USCAP, but USCAP is also more aimed at practicing pathologists, perhaps translating research to practicing pathologists, but it is not a pure research meeting. Most of the research has distinct clinical relevance. While it does have an academic bent, it's a clinical academic bent as opposed to investigational. USCAP is generally where the major pathology publications get their first presentation before appearing in AJSP or other journals.

Part of the problem with comparing pathology meetings to other, investigative-type meetings is that the media and medicine in general doesn't care as much about most of how pathologists decide to classify or appropriately diagnose various entities. Pathologists do, so it's significant to pathologists. Whereas a major clinical meeting like ASHA has stuff that impacts what both clinicians and pathologists do.

As to whether residents go to one or all, it varies. I have only gone to USCAP of those three. Have also gone to other meetings of other related societies like ASDP and ASC, all for presentations. Sometimes it depends on your own program's bias - we don't hear as much about CAP here, we hear more about ASCP and USCAP. And most attendings gear their projects and schedules around USCAP instead of others.
 

SLUsagar

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USCAP is probably the most "research" oriented meeting.
It depends on your goals. (that does not mean much in the real world)

the quality of the meetings in terms of peer review and scrutiny (in terms of what is accepted) is
1) USCAP
2) ASCP
3) CAP

Totally agree. USCAP is far the largest and has the most residents going, but doesn't nec. mean it's the "best." Depends on what you're looking for. USCAP has more of an academic, cutting-edge sort of feel (but fortunately more translational research type...not hardcore, bench stuff). ASCP a bit less on this, but more resident-oriented (i.e. courses are more geared towards general, perhaps private practice pathologists). CAP's basically like ASCP but again less academic and more resident/general education oriented, but a bit more formal/fancy (at least in my opinion) than ASCP.

To sum up my assessment of the overall "feel" of the sessions based on the majority of dudes' outfits (obviously exceptions exist):
1) USCAP - tons of suits/ties
2) CAP - sports jackets
3) ASCP - slacks and a shirt

Best story I can give is sitting in a GI lecture at an ASCP course, roomed filled with obvious private practice folks and some residents, and the presented asked the crowd (as an intro to particular topic) "So how many of you have encountered a GIST in your practice?" In my mind as a resident at a larger academic center, I was under the assumption that a bunch of folks would be raising their hands...but saw only a few hands go up, in the room of around 100-200 or so. At USCAP I think things would have been different.

But having attended courses at both, I really enjoyed the more general review type courses at ASCP. I could very easily just show up a talk on say adrenal tumors and get a great, overall review, as if I'd just read up on say the WHO or AFIP. But at USCAP, I'd be a bit more nervous about picking a random section to attend. Their review is less detailed and often dives right into current issues/debates, topics you'd instead find in AJSP/etc. But it's great to solidify an area you're interested in, making you even more up2date.
 
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