Car advice

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by emidesu, May 10, 2007.

  1. emidesu

    emidesu Senior Member
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    I'm an OMS-I and have never had a driver's license. I'm starting to think about getting my license and buying a car before I start rotations. Can anyone recommend a car that would be cheap enough to buy with student loans, but reliable and easy to drive (automatic). I'm worried about being able to depend on a car for away rotations. I'd like to hear people's experiences.
     
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  3. Boner

    Boner I just blue myself
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    I will be buying a new car this Summer and living on a student budget as well. I have found that you have a few options when purchasing a car on a budget.

    1. Buy used. Check out autotrader.com for used cars in your area. You'll be able to find something that you can afford.

    2. Buy new. You'll be looking at economy cars for this option. Things like the Toyota Yaris, Nissan Versa, Kia :)thumbdown ), etc... Depending on your down payment you can have a payment of less than $200. And remember, the best deals will be around Thanksgiving/Christmas when nobody is thinking about buying cars, plus it's model year end.

    3. Lease new. Payments are generally lower when you lease a vehicle. You can most likely lease a small sedan (Ford Focus, Nissan Sentra, Toyota Corolla, etc...) on your budget.

    4. VW drivers option. This is the lease/buy hybrid option exclusive to VW (I think). Put some money down, make low monthly payments for 36 months, and when your option is up you can buy out the balance, refinance the balance, or give the car back (like a lease). This makes for very low monthly payments. Personally, I'm going with this option. My payments on a new Jetta will be ~$150/month.
     
  4. ginger60

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    I had a MS2 friend who bought a yaris, very happy with it and it seemed very affordable (although don't expect to be able to drive a lot of people around)
     
  5. im do 08

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    Go for Honda (Civic for example) or Toyota, which are notoriously the most durable cars out there. So if you buy a second hand car, odds are you won't get stranded in the middle of the highway!

    Check carfax for the VIN number if buying second hand!!!

    Good luck!
     
  6. ericdamiansean

    ericdamiansean High Profiler
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    Isn't that better? You don't have to drive people around..but always look at fuel economy. Kia saves alot (I drive one)
     
  7. ginger60

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    yeah, it was good for him, bad for us (his friends) who were hoping he might finally drive us around in his new car :) all in all, a good choice for a med student
     
  8. ericdamiansean

    ericdamiansean High Profiler
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    On long journeys, we split up the toll and petrol.
    But it's always the guys in the SUVs who get heaps of passengers
     
  9. Auraraptor

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    Just Marketing by enlarge. Most if not all leases have a "buy it now" option offered at the end of the lease.
     
  10. Boner

    Boner I just blue myself
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    It's better than a standard lease if your state taxes each lease payment as opposed to taxing up front pricing. I just found out my future state of residence taxes on the lease price of the vehicle, so I will not be going with this option.
     
  11. t33sg1rl

    t33sg1rl Senior Member
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    You might want to think twice about leasing. Think about it-you make monthly payments for years, and at the end, you have nothing to show for your money. You're still responsible for all repairs and maintenance, and if you're a day late getting your oil change, they'll fine you. Also, every tiny scratch on the car is going to cost you bigtime. Basically what happens is at the end of the lease, the dealership will come up with a list of penalties and fines that'll cost you at least a thousand dollars, then offer to "rescue" you by allowing you to buy your car at a "special" price... and that price won't be very special, but it's either that or pay all the penalties.

    If you're going to pay $150/month for three years, you've paid out $5400... for that money, why not buy a reliable used car? That way at the end of the three years, it's YOURS, free and clear. Most American cars can be driven to at least 150,000 miles without needing any major repairs, and most foreign cars will go to at least 200,000.

    Remember, each $150 you pay now with student loans is going to cost you about $300 down the road... taking out a car loan/lease and making payments with student loans is robbing Peter to pay Paul anyway.
     
  12. RockShox

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    This will be a fun adventure. I remember the experience. I buy cars all of the time, not for myself, but for all my friends and family because I am pretty good at negotiating. I now have it down to a science where I really only spend less than 5 minutes getting the price they want. Some suggestions...

    This site is not the best source of advice. Edmunds.com has an excellent information section for all people, but esp. first time buyer. They have a 10 section bit on lease vs. buy, new vs. used, pricing, warranties, and more. I would read it in completely and it should give you all the ammo you need.

    here is the link:

    http://www.edmunds.com/caradvice.html

    2. Use their pricing guide to get general ideas then purchase CR's price estimator when you have a model picked.

    3. Avoid any place that is no haggle. No haggle = we screw you plenty but still leave you feeling like a virgin.

    4. My special tip... When you have a model in mind and have picked a dealer...take the invoice price you learn about from CR or where ever and email a competing dealers internet department and see if they will give you a quote. If so take that with you to your chosen dealer and when they ask how much you will pay write that number down...(I love to add cents at the end just because they do that alot...i.e. 18,054.76 :laugh: ) When they laugh and say that's too low reply with, "Well Dummies Cars up the street already quoted me such and such. I have it in writing just thought I would give you all a chance before I drive up there.) They will 99% of the time beat their price for you right there and you are all done.

    Good luck read up on all the stuff I gave you and you will do fine.
     
  13. nlax30

    nlax30 Fellow
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    Definitely recommend reading through some of the guides on that site. The wife and I just bought our first car together a couple months together.

    My #1 piece of advice is do all your research and know what you want and how much you can spend before you even sit down in dealership and start talking prices. We spent a week test driving a few models to narrow it down to 2-3 cars. Then did some pricing research online, and then figured out what our bottom line was. THEN we went to the dealerships with the intention to buy. If you haven't done your research and are not sure exactly how much you can spend (either up front or in monthly payments) then you'll just waste hours of your time sitting down "negotiating". Be willing to just walk out, we walked out of one dealership after he wouldn't come down to our price and he literally ran out to the parking lot to stop us as we driving away.


    We decided to buy a 2006 used as having a factory warranty and the reliability were very important to us. Also when doing pricing research look for any rebates being offered.
     
  14. emidesu

    emidesu Senior Member
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    Thanks everyone- this gives me a place to start.
     

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