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Car Insurance

War of Arts

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Jul 30, 2019
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Hi, a quick question for those of you who will bring your car to school. I am currently driving the car with the registration under my dad's name, and we live in the same household, so there is one policy covering both of us. Now, I plan to move to another state for med school with this car, is it OK to keep my current insurance? What should I do? I don't want to change the ownership because the premium is much much higher under only my name. I have contacted my insurance company, but they gave me very blurry answers. What do you guys do in your cases? Do you need to get a new quote in the state where you attend a school or you maintain the current policy without telling the insurance company you are or will use your vehicle primarily in another state?
 
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jhmmd

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War of Arts said:
Hi, a quick question for those of you who will bring your car to school. I am currently driving the car with the registration under my dad's name, and we live in the same household, so there is one policy covering both of us. Now, I plan to move to another state for med school with this car, is it OK to keep my current insurance? What should I do? I don't want to change the ownership because the premium is much much higher under only my name. I have contacted my insurance company, but they gave me very blurry answers. What do you guys do in your cases? Do you need to get a new quote in the state where you attend a school or you maintain the current policy without telling the insurance company you are or will use your vehicle primarily in another state?
There are different laws pertaining to car insurance in each state, so you want to call your current insurance company and tell them that you're planning to move (unless you also plan to switch insurance companies when you move). Good luck with everything.
 
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longhaul3

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Many states require you to register your out-of-state vehicle in the new state within x days of moving there but exempt full-time students from doing so, and if you're going to keep the registration in your home state, I think your insurance policy should be from your home state as well. I don't know whether it will make a difference that you're no longer part of the same household.

You need to do some research on your new state's requirements. The insurance company may be able to help with some things, but it's your/your father's responsibility as the owner of the vehicle.
 
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KnightDoc

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Hi, a quick question for those of you who will bring your car to school. I am currently driving the car with the registration under my dad's name, and we live in the same household, so there is one policy covering both of us. Now, I plan to move to another state for med school with this car, is it OK to keep my current insurance? What should I do? I don't want to change the ownership because the premium is much much higher under only my name. I have contacted my insurance company, but they gave me very blurry answers. What do you guys do in your cases? Do you need to get a new quote in the state where you attend a school or you maintain the current policy without telling the insurance company you are or will use your vehicle primarily in another state?
You really need to go by what the insurance company says, rather than what we say or what you think the Internet says. You can do whatever you want with no risk, unless and until, of course, you need to file a claim, at which point you could very well find yourself without coverage if you are not upfront with the insurance company! Wanting to save money is understandable, but what's the point of paying for it at all if it might not be there when you need it?
 
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Rogue42

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Bro, register the vehicle in your name and just get a policy written in your own name in the state that you are from / currently live. You are moving for school, not to establish a permanent residency. So, you do not need to get an insurance policy written in / for that new specific state (because if you did thousands of college kids would have to do this each year, and it simply is not the case).

Like stated, you need your own policy. You're an adult now, and you need to pay your own bills including car insurance. Your premium is going to be covered by you COA anyways. Insurance companies just want to know which state you reside in (the one that matches your drivers license), and what the car will be used for primary (driving back and forth from school).
 
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rdyotz

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Insurance in one state may argue they don't have to cover you in case of an accident as you failed to tell them you moved and are not paying the higher (well, maybe just correct) premium in a new area. Your insurance is based on the zip area you live/commute. And yes, I have moved 5 miles away and had my premium increase 10% due to living in a less safe area.
 
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RangerBob

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Often you can keep your license/registration to your home state as a full time student-check with your DMV. I kept my home state plates/registration for all of med school. Both my home state and my med school DMVs said that was fine. Once I started residency though. I had to change.

Insurance however, is always based on where you park your car. I lived in a no-fault state one year (significantly higher rates). A number of residents didn’t want to pay the difference so they kept their old insurance. The state technically considered them uninsured, so that wasn’t so smart...

Get the new insurance policy. And check with your new state’s DMV regarding license/registration.
 
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