Cold feet about starting school

CaffineDoc24

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Hi guys. I just got accepted to a reputable DO school! So grateful. However, the past couple of months I have been having cold feet about medicine. I just wanna know what you guys think. I'm probably worrying for no good reason. I'll list reasons for/against doing it:

For:
-I love science/biology. Loved my SMP, which had physio, histo, embro, pharm, biochem classes, etc. I did pretty well (3.72 GPA)
-I like working with people, making lifelong friends with my patients
-I like the problem-solving aspect of medicine, and learning skills that over time allow me to work on my own, which is very satisfying.
-Stable job, income (you know all that stuff)
-Get to live in a cool new big city
-I did a rigorous SMP, so much of the first year would be review (except anatomy)
-I am so blessed that my parents would be paying for my education.

Cons:
-The school I got into has weekly exams, so the following are in that context (if anyone has this type of schedule, what was your routine like?).
-I have never been in a relationship before (I'm a guy), even though I'm pretty social and all that. Worried I won't have time for this stuff, especially during the clinical years. This is so so important to me. I want to live a well-rounded life (don't need to go partying every day by any means. I'd probably be working my butt off in any other field anyways, maybe just not as much as med school). Down to fall in love haha...
-I want time to exercise, travel, do hobbies. I've also always wanted to live in NYC for a short time (small concern).
-I will be away from my family for an indefinite amount of time. Feel like I'm gonna feel guilty one day, missing out on big life things. From LA, so getting a residency there could be tough.
-As a decade long acne patient, I'm really interested in dermatology. Hard to do this as a DO.
-I can get a little squeamish when it comes to surgery stuff/trauma (not so much blood on its own). Heard this goes away though.

I have considered going into "industry", like biopharm/consulting(would only do that hell for a few years)/healthcare administration. But nothing is guaranteed in those fields, I could end up in a dead-end job. I'm not sure how easy it is to get these jobs, and don't really have anyone to ask about this field (so here I am).
 

zNoodlez

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Hi guys. I just got accepted to a reputable DO school! So grateful. However, the past couple of months I have been having cold feet about medicine. I just wanna know what you guys think. I'm probably worrying for no good reason. I'll list reasons for/against doing it:

For:
-I love science/biology. Loved my SMP, which had physio, histo, embro, pharm, biochem classes, etc. I did pretty well (3.72 GPA)
-I like working with people, making lifelong friends with my patients
-I like the problem-solving aspect of medicine, and learning skills that over time allow me to work on my own, which is very satisfying.
-Stable job, income (you know all that stuff)
-Get to live in a cool new big city
-I did a rigorous SMP, so much of the first year would be review (except anatomy)
-I am so blessed that my parents would be paying for my education.

Cons:
-The school I got into has weekly exams, so the following are in that context (if anyone has this type of schedule, what was your routine like?).
-I have never been in a relationship before (I'm a guy), even though I'm pretty social and all that. Worried I won't have time for this stuff, especially during the clinical years. This is so so important to me. I want to live a well-rounded life (don't need to go partying every day by any means. I'd probably be working my butt off in any other field anyways, maybe just not as much as med school). Down to fall in love haha...
-I want time to exercise, travel, do hobbies. I've also always wanted to live in NYC for a short time (small concern).
-I will be away from my family for an indefinite amount of time. Feel like I'm gonna feel guilty one day, missing out on big life things. From LA, so getting a residency there could be tough.
-As a decade long acne patient, I'm really interested in dermatology. Hard to do this as a DO.
-I can get a little squeamish when it comes to surgery stuff/trauma (not so much blood on its own). Heard this goes away though.

I have considered going into "industry", like biopharm/consulting(would only do that hell for a few years)/healthcare administration. But nothing is guaranteed in those fields, I could end up in a dead-end job. I'm not sure how easy it is to get these jobs, and don't really have anyone to ask about this field (so here I am).
Have you considered PA/NP routes?
 
D

deleted1005514

Cons:
-The school I got into has weekly exams, so the following are in that context (if anyone has this type of schedule, what was your routine like?).

My school has exams every week for the first couple of weeks of each block, then every two weeks after that. It’s not bad, you learn to stay on top of things and not procrastinate.


-I have never been in a relationship before (I'm a guy), even though I'm pretty social and all that. Worried I won't have time for this stuff, especially during the clinical years. This is so so important to me. I want to live a well-rounded life (don't need to go partying every day by any means. I'd probably be working my butt off in any other field anyways, maybe just not as much as med school). Down to fall in love haha...

Tons of people from my class have started dating classmates. I think it’s easier when you’re already spending 40-60 hours a week doing the same things, and you understand each other’s struggles.

-I want time to exercise, travel, do hobbies. I've also always wanted to live in NYC for a short time (small concern).

No idea what living in NYC is about, but there’s time for hobbies and exercise in med school, travel during breaks, and live in NYC when you’re done.

-I will be away from my family for an indefinite amount of time. Feel like I'm gonna feel guilty one day, missing out on big life things. From LA, so getting a residency there could be tough.

This is tough, as there’s no way around it if you’re moving across the country. Yes, you will miss things, but YOUR big things are important too! FaceTime is helping for bridging the gap, as are trips home during breajs

-As a decade long acne patient, I'm really interested in dermatology. Hard to do this as a DO.

DOs match derm every year. Get out there and hustle if you really want it!

-I can get a little squeamish when it comes to surgery stuff/trauma (not so much blood on its own). Heard this goes away though.

It goes away...I had classmates get queasy/lightheaded during anatomy and on the days we had to give each other flu shots. I personally don’t like GI stuff, but you learn to block it out and move forward.
 
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Isoval

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Cons:
-I have never been in a relationship before (I'm a guy), even though I'm pretty social and all that. Worried I won't have time for this stuff, especially during the clinical years. This is so so important to me. I want to live a well-rounded life (don't need to go partying every day by any means. I'd

I was in a fairly intensive relationship as a first year.

-I want time to exercise, travel, do hobbies. I've also always wanted to live in NYC for a short time (small concern).

People in my class exercise all the time (not me, my spirit animal is a fatass) and I'm currently playing a videogame with a friend as I type this.

-As a decade long acne patient, I'm really interested in dermatology. Hard to do this as a DO.

1) It's also hard as an MD, 2) It's even harder if you're not a doctor.
 
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Hi guys. I just got accepted to a reputable DO school! So grateful. However, the past couple of months I have been having cold feet about medicine. I just wanna know what you guys think. I'm probably worrying for no good reason. I'll list reasons for/against doing it:

For:
-I love science/biology. Loved my SMP, which had physio, histo, embro, pharm, biochem classes, etc. I did pretty well (3.72 GPA)
-I like working with people, making lifelong friends with my patients
-I like the problem-solving aspect of medicine, and learning skills that over time allow me to work on my own, which is very satisfying.
-Stable job, income (you know all that stuff)
-Get to live in a cool new big city
-I did a rigorous SMP, so much of the first year would be review (except anatomy)
-I am so blessed that my parents would be paying for my education.

Cons:
-The school I got into has weekly exams, so the following are in that context (if anyone has this type of schedule, what was your routine like?).
-I have never been in a relationship before (I'm a guy), even though I'm pretty social and all that. Worried I won't have time for this stuff, especially during the clinical years. This is so so important to me. I want to live a well-rounded life (don't need to go partying every day by any means. I'd probably be working my butt off in any other field anyways, maybe just not as much as med school). Down to fall in love haha...
-I want time to exercise, travel, do hobbies. I've also always wanted to live in NYC for a short time (small concern).
-I will be away from my family for an indefinite amount of time. Feel like I'm gonna feel guilty one day, missing out on big life things. From LA, so getting a residency there could be tough.
-As a decade long acne patient, I'm really interested in dermatology. Hard to do this as a DO.
-I can get a little squeamish when it comes to surgery stuff/trauma (not so much blood on its own). Heard this goes away though.

I have considered going into "industry", like biopharm/consulting(would only do that hell for a few years)/healthcare administration. But nothing is guaranteed in those fields, I could end up in a dead-end job. I'm not sure how easy it is to get these jobs, and don't really have anyone to ask about this field (so here I am).
All new endeavors are fraught with anxiety.

You'll be fine. Go to med school, become a doctor and don't look back.

BTW, once you start telling women that you're going to be a doctor, you'll get plenty of dates, especially with the greedy ones. Little do that know that those who marry for money have to earn it.
 
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lumya

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I have considered going into "industry", like biopharm/consulting(would only do that hell for a few years)/healthcare administration. But nothing is guaranteed in those fields, I could end up in a dead-end job. I'm not sure how easy it is to get these jobs, and don't really have anyone to ask about this field (so here I am).

A lot of people above gave you great advice above, but as someone who worked in healthcare administration at a hospital and now works for a consulting firm I think I can give some insight on your alternative paths. I can't speak for all AMCs but the one that I worked at was frustratingly difficult to get anything done administratively. I joked with my co-workers that I was applying to medical school because maybe someone would finally listen to me if I was a doctor. It's a business position and the thing that made me leave was I experienced an event where someone superior to me was so callous in a business decision it didn't feel like I was working in a field to care for people.

Now I work for a consulting firm and I love it but it doesn't excite me as much as any of the other clinical-related things I've ever done. There are times my life just feels like a constant stream of (Zoom) meetings and there's not a lot of fulfillment. So you just have to figure out what it is that makes you happy. You've listed a lot of passion-related pros and your cons are related to issues that would come up with any other job. Your worries are that you won't enjoy the next 10 years of your life if you pursue medicine and those 10 years might have times that really suck, but think about what you want for the next 20, 30, 40 years.
 
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CaffineDoc24

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A lot of people above gave you great advice above, but as someone who worked in healthcare administration at a hospital and now works for a consulting firm I think I can give some insight on your alternative paths. I can't speak for all AMCs but the one that I worked at was frustratingly difficult to get anything done administratively. I joked with my co-workers that I was applying to medical school because maybe someone would finally listen to me if I was a doctor. It's a business position and the thing that made me leave was I experienced an event where someone superior to me was so callous in a business decision it didn't feel like I was working in a field to care for people.

Now I work for a consulting firm and I love it but it doesn't excite me as much as any of the other clinical-related things I've ever done. There are times my life just feels like a constant stream of (Zoom) meetings and there's not a lot of fulfillment. So you just have to figure out what it is that makes you happy. You've listed a lot of passion-related pros and your cons are related to issues that would come up with any other job. Your worries are that you won't enjoy the next 10 years of your life if you pursue medicine and those 10 years might have times that really suck, but think about what you want for the next 20, 30, 40 years.
Thank you for your insight. Just to learn more, what do you like about consulting? Do you feel like there are exit opportunities, and that the sky is the limit in terms of career progression? Do you see opportunity to starting your own business, either in consulting or other areas as a result of your experience?
 

lumya

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Thank you for your insight. Just to learn more, what do you like about consulting? Do you feel like there are exit opportunities, and that the sky is the limit in terms of career progression? Do you see opportunity to starting your own business, either in consulting or other areas as a result of your experience?

I really like the novelty of consulting. You work with one client on most likely one of their biggest projects and then when it’s over, you get to move on to the next big project, completely immerse yourself, and move on again.

In my current role I don’t have to travel which has been great for me taking classes and studying for the MCAT. I feel like there’s a lot of potential for horizontal movement in my company and I can move to a role that does travel more or works on slightly different things. I do see some limit in vertical movement because not a lot of people are leaving, especially in my department, which is both a good and bad thing. You will likely need an MBA to move ahead but even then you might have great qualifications but the director plays squash with this other applicant so it’s equally about the connections you make networking. If I don’t get into med school and stay in the field my plan will probably be to go to another firm in the next three years.

If you want the independence of opening your own firm it’s really going to depend on your specialized skill. Unless you’re a super, specialized person who works on software that only four people in the world operates you’ll probably be working for a firm. I don’t know what your background is but you’ll likely have to enter as an analyst and work your way up. I don’t work for a Big 5 but there’s tons of information online about just how hard it is to get an interview for one of the best companies.

Personally I see a lot more freedom and autonomy in medicine than I do in business. There’s lots of parody videos making fun of consulting because for 90% of us it’s really not glamorous at all. But it all comes down to what you want in life. I am grateful for the stability I have right now, I know regardless of what new disease or political change my job will likely be the same. Nothing I do is super hard or stressful and I don’t work more than 10 hours a day consistently. I would be ecstatic about the med school acceptance but I think it’s normal for you to have some doubts since the last couple of years have been this constant grind. But the grass isn’t really that much greener on the other side and you’ve achieved something that so many of us want. FIY we have some people in upper management who are doctors and when I worked in the hospital a lot of leadership were clinicians so you can always look into a business degree in the future as a doctor.
 
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Osminog

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Some thoughts about your “cons” list:

The odds of establishing and nurturing a meaningful romantic relationship in medical school are pretty low—unless you enter a relationship with a classmate, which is an endeavor that carries its own set of risks and challenges.

The odds of becoming a dermatologist after attending a DO school are astoundingly low.

It is possible to live a well-balanced life in medical school, but you would ultimately have to redefine what “well-balanced” and “well-rounded” mean to you. Medical students aren’t vacationing in the Bahamas in the middle of the school year, especially if they have weekly exams like you would.

You would likely feel regret and/or sorrow about the time that you missed with your family members and close friends throughout your masochistic quest toward becoming a physician. That comes with the territory.

The squeamishness is a non-issue. You would be rapidly desensitized during gross anatomy lab, as most students are.

Good luck with your decision. It’s a big one.
 

harrislakers123

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Some thoughts about your “cons” list:

The odds of establishing and nurturing a meaningful romantic relationship in medical school are pretty low—unless you enter a relationship with a classmate, which is an endeavor that carries its own set of risks and challenges.

The odds of becoming a dermatologist after attending a DO school are astoundingly low.

It is possible to live a well-balanced life in medical school, but you would ultimately have to redefine what “well-balanced” and “well-rounded” mean to you. Medical students aren’t vacationing in the Bahamas in the middle of the school year, especially if they have weekly exams like you would.

You would likely feel regret and/or sorrow about the time that you missed with your family members and close friends throughout your masochistic quest toward becoming a physician. That comes with the territory.

The squeamishness is a non-issue. You would be rapidly desensitized during gross anatomy lab, as most students are.

Good luck with your decision. It’s a big one.

There are nearly 30 former DO dermatology programs that are now ACGME. In addition there are tens of historically ACGME derm programs with DOs currently/formerly.
It is astoundingly difficult for anyone to match Derm but the opportunities are there.
 
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zNoodlez

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BTW, once you start telling women that you're going to be a doctor, you'll get plenty of dates, especially with the greedy ones. Little do that know that those who marry for money have to earn it.

Doctors are not the trend anymore. NPs are the new hot shots in town, you know, with the whole "Brain of a doctor, heart of a nurse" kind of thing lol.
 
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Ho0v-man

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If you want to have a life but also want to match derm as a DO, you’re gonna have a bad time.

But literally everyone in your class is second guessing everything right now. Totally normal.
 
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