grapp

EMT-A Firefighter
2+ Year Member
Jul 31, 2015
420
86
Idaho
Status
Non-Student
Hi,

I am currently a senior in high school. As of now I have been trying to improve my studying skills, and yes I have fun whenever I can with high school. I'm completing high school early so I think it will help prepare me for a more intense work load during college. I previously asked a physician what the most important aspect of college is.

He responded time management, which should in combination with: studying, homework, having fun, and eventually MCAT study time. Do any other pre-med, medical students, residency members, or doctors have any advice that will help me accel?

(I know people say not to worry about it, but it's what gets me thrilled for the career, I have considered all of my options however, this is one that really appeals to me.)
 

studentDOnut

2+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2015
19
5
Your passion and commitment so early on is refreshing.

Once you get into a good university, get involved and make some friends with similar goals. Do things that interest you and join clubs/play sports and make the most out of your college experience as in have fun too!

In terms of studying, just try different methods- flash cards, learning videos, etc. One method will eventually work. This is important because you will need to try to learn as much info as you can, so you are well-prepared for the mcat and to keep a solid 3.5+ gpa.

Finally, *most important part* shadow some physicians in various specialties! This will really drive home whether or not you want to be a doctor and they'll answer the many questions you probably have. You will see a lot and will really open your eyes of what medicine really is.

Good luck to you and feel free to message me anytime!
 
  • Like
Reactions: grapp

YorkH

2+ Year Member
May 25, 2015
130
118
Florida
Status
Medical Student
Don't ever be afraid to ask for help. Some classes can be absolutely brutal, so you definitely need all the help you can get. Going to your professor's office hours, free tutoring, your fellow students, and outside tutoring services are some examples of what you can turn to if you need help.
 

frosted_flake

waaahmbulance attendant
Oct 27, 2012
1,151
737
Los Angeles
Status
Pre-Medical
Attend supplemental instruction/tutoring/extra sessions once you get to college. I don't believe they offer that in HS, but once you get to college it will help you stay ahead of the game from the beginning :)
 

Dr.Sticks

2+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2014
1,118
620
Status
Pre-Medical
Take advantage of any free tutoring, take advantage of office hours, read the chapters, and manage your time
Personally I have a spreadsheet balancing my volunteer commitments, study time, homework time, leisure time, etc..

Oh, and read the chapters.. You'll get tests often, and maybe 2% of the lecture will cover the material on the quiz.. Has happened to me several times already.. :L
 
  • Like
Reactions: JustintheDoctor

JustintheDoctor

High functioning FeelsOpath
5+ Year Member
May 9, 2013
265
133
Status
Pre-Medical
Take advantage of any free tutoring, take advantage of office hours, read the chapters, and manage your time
Personally I have a spreadsheet balancing my volunteer commitments, study time, homework time, leisure time, etc..

Oh, and read the chapters.. You'll get tests often, and maybe 2% of the lecture will cover the material on the quiz.. Has happened to me several times already.. :L
This +1. I don't even have to go to Bio lecture, all of his slides are identical from the textbook.
 

Dr.Sticks

2+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2014
1,118
620
Status
Pre-Medical
This +1. I don't even have to go to Bio lecture, all of his slides are identical from the textbook.
Yeah; Unfortunately some professors won't let you skip and might report you to fin aid. Others take roll every day and use it as a grade.. Some don't care.
I have a mix of all three.. Darn.. I'd learn much more by just studying the chapter, taking notes on my own.. Instead I have to waste time in a lecture and look at some power point that only covers like less than 10% of material on the quiz. Holy crap, and then the professor that just reads the power point word for word? Not falling asleep is a miracle..
 
G

gunnerdoc

There are many important things you will learn in college and not all of it in classwork. The physician was correct in stating that time manaagement is a large part of being successful in college, medical school, residency and beyond. I would add a couple things to that and have elaborated a little below.

1. Time Management: Use a calendar. I use a Google Calendar synced to my phone, which lets me add events, see what I have planned for the week, block time for studying, free time, etc. Understand how to be efficient with your time. When you are studying, do not study and look at Facebook at the same, you will end up studying 25% of the time and goofing off 75% of the time, thus taking four times as long to do you work. Play hard, work hard. Understand how you can maximize your time and streamline your day.

2. Figure out how you study effectively. Some people go to lectures, some people read their text, some people do well with practice problems/Q's. You need to figure out what works for you in college. I personally use Anki to use flashcards, since I require problems and repetition to keep things in my memory.

3. Do not be afraid to ask for help and do not procrastinate. Keeping in with time management, be a self-starter. Do things early, do not wait for deadlines, always budget in time for unfortunate events. There is no excuse for 'why did you wait until the last minute'. Professors have office hours for a reason and will be more than helpful, especially if they know you are trying to make a genuine effort to succeed.

4. Have fun. Being a pre-med and trying to get into medical school is stressful and just the first part of a long journey. But you don't get your college years back. Enjoy one of the few times where your responsibilities are low, you're surrounded by many young, liberal, and like-minded people. That being said, do not get in trouble with the law. Do not do drugs, and do not knock anyone up. Period.
 
OP
grapp

grapp

EMT-A Firefighter
2+ Year Member
Jul 31, 2015
420
86
Idaho
Status
Non-Student
There are many important things you will learn in college and not all of it in classwork. The physician was correct in stating that time manaagement is a large part of being successful in college, medical school, residency and beyond. I would add a couple things to that and have elaborated a little below.

1. Time Management: Use a calendar. I use a Google Calendar synced to my phone, which lets me add events, see what I have planned for the week, block time for studying, free time, etc. Understand how to be efficient with your time. When you are studying, do not study and look at Facebook at the same, you will end up studying 25% of the time and goofing off 75% of the time, thus taking four times as long to do you work. Play hard, work hard. Understand how you can maximize your time and streamline your day.

2. Figure out how you study effectively. Some people go to lectures, some people read their text, some people do well with practice problems/Q's. You need to figure out what works for you in college. I personally use Anki to use flashcards, since I require problems and repetition to keep things in my memory.

3. Do not be afraid to ask for help and do not procrastinate. Keeping in with time management, be a self-starter. Do things early, do not wait for deadlines, always budget in time for unfortunate events. There is no excuse for 'why did you wait until the last minute'. Professors have office hours for a reason and will be more than helpful, especially if they know you are trying to make a genuine effort to succeed.

4. Have fun. Being a pre-med and trying to get into medical school is stressful and just the first part of a long journey. But you don't get your college years back. Enjoy one of the few times where your responsibilities are low, you're surrounded by many young, liberal, and like-minded people. That being said, do not get in trouble with the law. Do not do drugs, and do not knock anyone up. Period.
Thanks, and sounds good! :)
 

Stagg737

5+ Year Member
Jul 2, 2013
7,470
9,473
Decapod 10
Status
Resident [Any Field]
There are many important things you will learn in college and not all of it in classwork. The physician was correct in stating that time manaagement is a large part of being successful in college, medical school, residency and beyond. I would add a couple things to that and have elaborated a little below.

1. Time Management: Use a calendar. I use a Google Calendar synced to my phone, which lets me add events, see what I have planned for the week, block time for studying, free time, etc. Understand how to be efficient with your time. When you are studying, do not study and look at Facebook at the same, you will end up studying 25% of the time and goofing off 75% of the time, thus taking four times as long to do you work. Play hard, work hard. Understand how you can maximize your time and streamline your day.

2. Figure out how you study effectively. Some people go to lectures, some people read their text, some people do well with practice problems/Q's. You need to figure out what works for you in college. I personally use Anki to use flashcards, since I require problems and repetition to keep things in my memory.

3. Do not be afraid to ask for help and do not procrastinate. Keeping in with time management, be a self-starter. Do things early, do not wait for deadlines, always budget in time for unfortunate events. There is no excuse for 'why did you wait until the last minute'. Professors have office hours for a reason and will be more than helpful, especially if they know you are trying to make a genuine effort to succeed.

4. Have fun. Being a pre-med and trying to get into medical school is stressful and just the first part of a long journey. But you don't get your college years back. Enjoy one of the few times where your responsibilities are low, you're surrounded by many young, liberal, and like-minded people. That being said, do not get in trouble with the law. Do not do drugs, and do not knock anyone up. Period.
I have nothing to add, this is just such perfect advice it needs to be quoted again. +10.

@grapp , If you can master the advice given in gunnerdoc's post early, it will make college, medical school, and the rest of your career significantly easier. Things get significantly harder and change at each step, but time management, balance, and efficiency will always be important tools for success. Master that and you'll have a good foundation for whatever you try and do.
 

jqueb29

7+ Year Member
May 4, 2011
1,085
1,779
Status
Medical Student
Yeah; Unfortunately some professors won't let you skip and might report you to fin aid. Others take roll every day and use it as a grade.. Some don't care.
I have a mix of all three.. Darn.. I'd learn much more by just studying the chapter, taking notes on my own.. Instead I have to waste time in a lecture and look at some power point that only covers like less than 10% of material on the quiz. Holy crap, and then the professor that just reads the power point word for word? Not falling asleep is a miracle..
Lol you'll love med school then. Pretty much any quality med school has video lectures you can watch from home and no mandatory attendance except for a couple things a week. It's the way school should be lol
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dr.Sticks

sonofva

10+ Year Member
Aug 31, 2009
1,066
384
Status
Attending Physician
Just realize that some people are going to have an easier time than you. Some people are really going to be having an easier time. Some people will just be blowing smoke to make themselves seem better than they are... For me there was no easy way. I had to grind it all through my post bacc and all through medical school. If it turns out that this Is the case for you, I'd recommend self assessing very early on to see how much your truly willing to sacrifice.