license43

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Hi all... just wondering what are the common conditions IM doctors treat?

How are the days for residents vs regular IM doctors?? Just curious...

How is it different from FM, asides from FM treating people across the lifespan including OB/GYN.
 

bashwell

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Hi all... just wondering what are the common conditions IM doctors treat?

How are the days for residents vs regular IM doctors?? Just curious...

How is it different from FM, asides from FM treating people across the lifespan including OB/GYN.
Are you a med student? You'll learn all this in med school and more in residency.
 
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They're both primary care so to speak.
So there's overlap, which you've caught on.

In IM you treat patients that need to be in hospital, the really sick (not so sick they need ICU). IM is also mainly focussed more on older populations with multiple comorbidities. there's also more depth to that they need to know as a result. they would also have all the resources a hospital has within their reach. It's great if you like complexity and puzzles, but not so much if you don't like..crumbly elderly patients, because that's bread and butter. Common cases - heart failure, pneumonia (like really bad pneumonia), COPD, functional decline, etc.

versus FM - apart from the obvious (the wide variety of cases of all age groups). Look at it this way - they look after stable patients, well enough to be treated in the community. if you look at pneumonia, if patients require a short course of IV antibiotics, they could get that in the emergency department then go home with a script for orals. get followed up by a FM doc. if the pneumonia's not so severe, an FM doc could just treat with orals, and follow-up (no trip to hospital necessary). if the patient is quite old and frail, they're not necessarily going to bounce back from infections like you would when you're young. bonus points if the patient has multiple comorbidities. then they would go under IM. Also, FM - you work from an office, it doesn't have hospital beds, or the necessary selection of IV drugs and nursing staff to provide care etc etc.

A lot to IM is about discharge planning as well, physiotherapy and occupational therapy, ensuring it's safe for the patient to go home. or if they need transitioning to a nursing home (then they could be referred to geriatrics from there). For FM, it's following up on these things, making referrals when needed.

Long story short:
FM - primarily in the office, out in the community. little of everything. stabler patients and a wider population. when you're young, this may be the only doctor you'll ever see. you must like people/patients, it's a lot of face time with them in clinic.
IM - in the hospital, can do outpatients, but you're looking at sicker patients, often with multiple things going on. greater complexity, requiring greater depth of knowledge in adult medicine. mainly older populations. must like ward rounding and old people. to a degree.

As for residents versus regular doctors lol. you mean attendings versus residents?

at any rate, like what's been said above.
if you're a med student, suffice it to say, when you start rotations, it'll be become more obvious what the differences are to what people do in these fields.
 
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Siggy

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In IM you treat patients that need to be in hospital, the really sick (not so sick they need ICU)
Except all those hospitals that can't close their ICU and cover the ICU with intensivists, which is a fairly large percent of hospitals.
 
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I meant in relative terms.
You can't have all patients in ICU. Lol, it doesn't always go, ED --> ICU. Sometimes yes.
But if they're not well enough to go home, they stay on the wards. Similarly, patients in ICU step down to the wards, not ICU --> home.
 

PlutoBoy

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Hi all... just wondering what are the common conditions IM doctors treat?

How are the days for residents vs regular IM doctors?? Just curious...

How is it different from FM, asides from FM treating people across the lifespan including OB/GYN.
I'm an IM doc.

COMMON COLD
SORE THROAT
ALLERGIC RHINITIS
SKIN RASHES: Poison ivy, tinea , eczema...
HTN
Diabetes
High cholesterol
COPD
Depression/Anxiety
Atrial fibrillation
Medical management of coronary artery disease
Heart failure
Vaginal infections
Pneumonia
Managing warfarin
Cellulitis
Skin abscess
Degenerative arthritis
Liver disease to a certain extent
MSK pain
INGROWN TOENAILS
Preventive care: Setting up colonoscopies/cologuard, pap smears, mammograms, making sure ppl get the vaccines they need, lung cancer screening, prostate cancer screening, hep c screening, HIV screning...

That's about 90% of what I do I think. I also chart a lot.

Days as an attending are good. I actually think it is one of the "good lifestyle" specialties.

In the outpatient setting it's not very different than FM.

As far as workload, I work 35-40 hrs per week.
 
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license43

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I'm an IM doc.

COMMON COLD
SORE THROAT
ALLERGIC RHINITIS
SKIN RASHES: Poison ivy, tinea , eczema...
HTN
Diabetes
High cholesterol
COPD
Depression/Anxiety
Atrial fibrillation
Medical management of coronary artery disease
Heart failure
Vaginal infections
Pneumonia
Managing warfarin
Cellulitis
Skin abscess
Degenerative arthritis
Liver disease to a certain extent
MSK pain
INGROWN TOENAILS
Preventive care: Setting up colonoscopies/cologuard, pap smears, mammograms, making sure ppl get the vaccines they need, lung cancer screening, prostate cancer screening, hep c screening, HIV screning...

That's about 90% of what I do I think. I also chart a lot.

Days as an attending are good. I actually think it is one of the "good lifestyle" specialties.

In the outpatient setting it's not very different than FM.

As far as workload, I work 35-40 hrs per week.
Thanks! Very diverse set of things you do. Doesn't look too bad!
 

Siggy

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I meant in relative terms.
You can't have all patients in ICU. Lol, it doesn't always go, ED --> ICU. Sometimes yes.
But if they're not well enough to go home, they stay on the wards. Similarly, patients in ICU step down to the wards, not ICU --> home.
No, not all the patients are in the unit. However the words you parenthetically posted indicated that IM docs don't treat patients in the ICU.
 

Siggy

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Lol. Sure, thanks for correcting my grammar.
That's not grammar. I disagreed with a clause in your argument. It's like Trump claiming he didn't equivocate Neo-Nazis and non-Neo-Nazis because "on all sides" wasn't in the script.
 
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