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nyeyes

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a question: my mother recently decided she wanted to give contacts a try. She is 50 yo & has been wearing progressive bifocals for a while now... She visited an optomotrist who gave her a trial pair of contacts: one for distance, and the other for near. She was told that she would get the hang of the different lenses after a while. It seems that with this pair she would be using only one eye for distance & one eye for near & her brain would have to get used to this. Is this something that is ok, as I've never encountered this? Or would she be better off getting contacts for distnace only?
 

Visionary

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nyeyes said:
a question: my mother recently decided she wanted to give contacts a try. She is 50 yo & has been wearing progressive bifocals for a while now... She visited an optomotrist who gave her a trial pair of contacts: one for distance, and the other for near. She was told that she would get the hang of the different lenses after a while. It seems that with this pair she would be using only one eye for distance & one eye for near & her brain would have to get used to this. Is this something that is ok, as I've never encountered this? Or would she be better off getting contacts for distnace only?
This method is typically referred to as Monovision and involves correcting one eye for myopia (near-sightedness) while correcting the other for presbyopia (age-related far-sightedness). There is nothing medically wrong with this, but not everyone can adjust to the differing corrections. For some, it is very disorienting. Those who can adjust swear by it (and may even have it applied "permanently" through refractive surgery). Your mother should give it some time to see if it works for her.
 

cpw

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monovision correction works wonderfully for a lot of people. I've fit a few friends that one and two out of the three of them LOVE it. one of them just couldn't adjust. The major adjustment with monovision is for driving... you have to be VERY careful with driving with a monovision correction for the first week or so.

There are also bifocal contact lenses and progressive contact lenses which would also be options for your mother.

If she was just corrected for distance, she would have to wear reading glasses on top of her contacts (which usually defeats the purpose of why they came to the OD to get contacts in the first place)

hope this helps in some way ! let me know if you have any other questions.. :)
 
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Richard_Hom

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nyeyes said:
"... It seems that with this pair she would be using only one eye for distance & one eye for near & her brain would have to get used to this. Is this something that is ok, as I've never encountered this? Or would she be better off getting contacts for distnace only?
Dear nyeyes:

Only about 50% of the population can tolerate monovision due to retinal rivalry. In addition, the anisometropia that is created, if over 1.75 or 2.00 Diopters) may prevent even these individuals from tolerating this option.

Generally, monovision, in my opinion, should not be considered for general use but indoor. The anisometropia that is created may also effect depth perception (note: not stereoacuity).

Regards,
Richard_Hom
 
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