Jul 29, 2009
177
0
Status
Pre-Dental
I get the math they did to get the answer, only thing is I dont get is why you can use the Initial Change Equilibrium table. Why should a loss of pressure in B result in twice the increase in the pressure of C?

Thanks!
 
Jul 30, 2009
33
0
Status
Pre-Dental
I think you shouldn't think too hard about these problems. Literally ANYTIME you see a K (Ksp, Ka, Kb, Kp) you can think about the ICE table. It tells you the initial pressures & total pressure at equilibrium, from there you just have to identify that the equilibruim values are what they're looking for. You HAVE to get these values to plug in for the equation for Kp. Hope this helps.
 
May 31, 2009
45
0
Status
Pre-Dental
The way I see it the entire flask is at equilibrium so it's not really about the values of each but the combined values of all of them to equal 0.6 atm. so the pressure lost on the reactant side is the pressure gained by the product but it's all proportional to how much of each compound there is at equilibrium.

i'm not sure if I'm making much sense but that's just the way i make sense of it in my head. but think about it. the pressure of all three at equilibrium is 0.3, 0.1, and 0.2 respectively. so you can see that at equilibrium the pressure for C is halfway between the pressure for A and B. and the pressure for A was the largest initially so at equilibrum one would expect that even though it's lost some pressure to create C, because it has the same number of moles as C then at equilibrum it will have the most pressure. And since B had the smaller of the pressures and has less moles than C, then at equilibrium it will have the smallest amount of pressure.