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Dilemmas about transfering to another pharmacy school

Discussion in 'Pharmacy' started by stu0513, Jun 14, 2008.

  1. stu0513

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    Hi, everyone, I'm a current student here at Albany and I was planning on transferring to another school. The reason is that the curriculum here are so tough that I failed one course last semester. Don't take me wrong. I worked very hard during the semester. I studied from the time I get off school to when I go to sleep. I study about 5 hours a day, 8 hours before exam and 10 hours during weekend. We started out with 75 students and only 57 were left. The average of each class is about 2.6. I will have to retake my classes next year.

    Now enough of the complaint, I applied to Midwestern and happened to get in. Now I don't know what to do now. Sure, courses at my current school is tough, but I have already completed one semester of it, and none of it will transfer. Also, I've already gotten all the old exams for all classes from my seniors. One more thing that I am afraid of is that pharmacy schools in general may be just as tough as at my current school. I actually graduated from a community college, so that may be why I'm having such a hard time? If that's the case, moving out will not fix the situation. However, I've heard students at Midwestern enjoying their life, and I'm not sure if that's my school itself to blame, or my study habits and time management.

    My question is that what do you think about this? How was the difficulty like in your pharmacy school. What is the approximate average like for each class at your school? Would it really be worth it if I transfer? I've already taken one semester worth of course + 1 retake (Med Chem). Retaking courses will make my load easier for the semester. Also, moving to a new place will mean getting used to new environment and thus new problems may show up.
     
    #1 stu0513, Jun 14, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2008
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  3. loo

    loo Always Sleepy
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    You've already had 2 retakes of a class??? I'm confused. If this is the case, are you sure pharmacy is right for you in the first place regardless of the school/program?:confused:
     
  4. stu0513

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    Sorry, I meant one retake. I've already made the editing. I've considered about changing of program, but it's too late now. I've already invested a lot of money and time on pharmacy. Right now, I just want to either stay in Albany or transfer to Midwestern
     
  5. pharmagirl

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    I wouldn't transfer... pharmacy school is going to be difficult wherever you go. Have you talked to your professors or advisers at your school that help with tutoring and time management? Maybe you just need to meet with someone like that to see if there is anything you can do differently to improve your situation.
     
  6. RxWildcat

    RxWildcat Julius Randle BEASTMODE!
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    Some pharmacy schools may be easier than others (Gasp!), however transferring from one pharmacy school to another can be very involved. Not all pharmacy curriculums align with one another, so you would likely not be able to transfer all of your existing pharmacy credits or you might have to re-take some courses that you have already taken. Also, the deans of both colleges have to review and accept the transfer. Just to clarify, what year are you in school and are you in a traditional 4 year pharmacy school?
     
  7. MountainPharmD

    MountainPharmD custodiunt illud simplex
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    Why do you think it will be easier at another school? Pharmacy schoool is hard. Maybe you should think real hard and decide if pharmacy school is really for you.
     
  8. DoctorRx1986

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    From what I have heard, the College of Pharmacy in Albany has one of the highest attrition rates. Many students do not finish the program, as it is particularly demanding and overwhelming. Therefore, I'm not really surprised. I've read many students failing out.
     
  9. janeno

    janeno Senior Member
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    I think that if you are very unhappy at your current program, you should transfer. It seems that your school has already lost high number of students. My pharmacy school is very tough and is in top 5 pharmacy schools; however, the administration tries their that everyone graduates and graduates on time. The classes are difficult and you need to study a lot, but if you need help there are tutors and professors are always there to help. In fact I believe, we have 97-100% retention rate. Moreover, I also believe that pharmacy school is not just about passing classes and graduating. Extra-curricular activities as well as making friendships is as important not only for your future career but for your own well-being. Moreover, in my personal opinion, the school should not be accepting student just to get rid off around 20 students later. If this is their purpose, then they should reduce their class size from the beginning.

    I am not sure which Midwestern school you are talking about, but if it is Chicago campus, I have heard very good things about this school. So I think you should transfer. You might loose some money and semester worth of classes, but at the end you will be at the school that makes you happy. Think about it, 20 years down the road you don't want to remember how much you hated your pharmacy school, you want to think of it as a place where you studied hard but had a lot of good time.
     
  10. RX CARE

    RX CARE Eye Have You!!
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    We students........we all complain......and we all try to blame something for whatever we complain about......you are still gonna complain at midwestern. If you are having such a hard time passing, ( and I think with old exams I might add)...it's really not gonna get easier else where......the stories you hear about students having fun are most probably true....but those stories do not tell you how each of those students are doing...wether they are failing as well...repeating classes, just barely making it and will fail sooner or later, or are the super smart ones who study only 3 hours b4 exams. Bottom line is that you gotta do you.......screw stats....screw retention rates...screw naplex pass rates...screw class averages. You gotta be able to handle a pharmaceutical education....and you gotta work hard to tackle what is thrown at you....and you can do it if u motivated enough....get help.
    I'm not sure how just knowing that another school has a higher class average will guarantee that you will pass......you could possibly still be the only one that fails......you never know. You just gotta be able to come up with a means to grasp the material....if you can, you shouldn't be failing......
     
  11. bacillus1

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    I was thinking about transfering as well (and would if it were easy), but it just seems like wherever you transfer you will lose time. Is it really worth it to graduate late? My school also has a relatively high attrition rate (USP), but I think that's how most direct-entry programs are structured: relatively easy to get in, harder to stay in. If I were given a choice to transfer but lose a semester (and about $14000), I would never do it.
    Also it doesn't seem like they'd let you transfer with a failed class, no matter what school you go to.
     

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