hallowmann

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A few things:
-Posted in a reply within an Osteo thread, but I think it deserves its own thread in Pre-Osteo for current DO applicants
-Credit to @jkdoctor for posting the AACOM report
-Here's last year's thread, which may be helpful and answer some questions - DO match rate 2016
-These numbers are all based on published reports. Reports sometimes have errors. Either way, hopefully this is useful.
-This says nothing about the type of GME attained. Some are only intern year positions and not full residencies. That said, with completion of only an intern year and the full COMLEX series, a DO graduate can attain a medical license to practice in more than 30 states. Please see NRMP and NMS reports for residency distributions.



The 2017 DO match rate (as in true match rate) for all seniors seeking GME is between 88.7% and 89.2% (compared to between 87.2% and 88.4% for 2016). For reference, the US MD seniors 2017 match rate was 94.3% (compared to 93.8% in 2016).

The range is due to the lack of breakdown of the 166 DOs that SOAPed into seniors vs. past graduates. At least 139 seniors attained positions in the SOAP (compared to 69 in 2016). If all of the other DOs who SOAPed were seniors, the match rate would be 88.7%. If all of the other DOs that SOAPed were previous graduates, the match rate would be 89.2%. There appeared to be only 27 previous DO graduates that attained positions in the NRMP match or SOAP (less than half compared to last year). Based on all this, the true match rate is likely somewhere between 88.7% and 89.2%.

The corrected DO senior NRMP match rate is somewhere between 87.5% and 88.3% (compared to between 86.4% and 88.8% in 2016), again varied depending on the breakdown of the SOAP. 3323 DO seniors (compared to 2699 in 2016) and 267 previous DO graduates (compared to 283 in 2016) participated in the NRMP match. 3072 DO seniors (compared to 2465 in 2016) attained positions in the NRMP match and SOAP.

The combined 2017 DO senior and graduates NRMP match rate is the reported 81.7% (compared to 80.3% in 2016). For comparison, the combined US MD senior and graduate NRMP match rate was 90.7% (compared to 90.3% in 2016).

The 2017 placement rate of DO seniors is 99.34% (compared to 99.61% in 2016) meaning that 39 current seniors (0.66%) that wanted GME failed to attain it (compared to 21 - 0.39% - in 2016). An additional 47 ( compared to 43 in 2016) did not wish to attain GME this year.

463 current DO seniors scrambled into AOA spots (compared to 535 in 2016), which constitutes 7.8% (compared to ~10% in 2016) of current DO seniors seeking GME this year. Somewhere between 139 and 166 current DO seniors attained positions in the SOAP, representing between 2.3% and 2.8% of current DO seniors. The 10.1% to 10.6% that attained positions in the SOAP or scramble is the majority of the remaining 10.8%-11.3% unmatched seniors that placed.

Conclusions:
-DO match rate appears to have gone up slightly compared to last year. It went up at least 0.3% (at most 2%), and this is pretty consistent with the US MD match rate which went up 0.5%.
-More DOs this year went without a GME position than compared to last year (39 vs 21). This is mostly due to a lower placement rate (99.34% vs. 99.61%) and likely partially due to an overall increase in DO seniors this year compared to last year (5937 vs. 5377 - yes, that is a 560 increase of DO seniors seeking GME in one year).
-More DO seniors SOAPed this year, compared to last year (double - 70). This can mean a couple of things. For one there are more DO seniors. For another, it probably means more DOs accepted positions in the SOAP as opposed to scrambling post-NRMP into an open AOA spot.
-Placement of DOs in AOA programs is down significantly from last year to this year (49% in 2016 to 43% in 2017). In turn the number placing into ACGME positions increased reciprocally from 46% in 2016 to 52% in 2017.
-The number of DO seniors not seeking GME this year went up by 4, but is almost exactly the same percentage of DO seniors as last year (~0.8%), so this isn't a surprise.
-Overall, good job to the class of 2017!


The sources of this data can be found here:
-AACOM placement report - http://www.aacom.org/docs/default-s...-grad-placements-in-2017-matches.pdf?sfvrsn=8
-NRMP match report - http://www.nrmp.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Main-Match-Results-and-Data-2017.pdf
 
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Alienman52

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A few things:
-Posted in a reply within an Osteo thread, but I think it deserves its own thread in Pre-Osteo for current DO applicants
-Credit to @jkdoctor for posting the AACOM report
-Here's last year's thread, which may be helpful and answer some questions - DO match rate 2016
-These numbers are all based on published reports. Reports sometimes have errors. Either way, hopefully this is useful.
-This says nothing about the type of GME attained. Some are only intern year positions and not full residencies. That said, with completion of only an intern year and the full COMLEX series, a DO graduate can attain a medical license to practice in more than 30 states. Please see NRMP and NMS reports for residency distributions.



The 2017 DO match rate (as in true match rate) for all seniors seeking GME is between 88.7% and 89.2% (compared to between 87.2% and 88.4% for 2016). For reference, the US MD seniors 2017 match rate was 94.3% (compared to 93.8% in 2016).

The range is due to the lack of breakdown of the 166 DOs that SOAPed into seniors vs. past graduates. At least 139 seniors attained positions in the SOAP (compared to 69 in 2016). If all of the other DOs who SOAPed were seniors, the match rate would be 88.7%. If all of the other DOs that SOAPed were previous graduates, the match rate would be 89.2%. There appeared to be only 27 previous DO graduates that attained positions in the NRMP match or SOAP (less than half compared to last year). Based on all this, the true match rate is likely somewhere between 88.7% and 89.2%.

The corrected DO senior NRMP match rate is somewhere between 87.5% and 88.3% (compared to between 86.4% and 88.8% in 2016), again varied depending on the breakdown of the SOAP. 3323 DO seniors (compared to 2699 in 2016) and 267 previous DO graduates (compared to 283 in 2016) participated in the NRMP match. 3072 DO seniors (compared to 2465 in 2016) attained positions in the NRMP match and SOAP.

The combined 2017 DO senior and graduates NRMP match rate is the reported 81.7% (compared to 80.3% in 2016). For comparison, the combined US MD senior and graduate NRMP match rate was 90.7% (compared to 90.3% in 2016).

The 2017 placement rate of DO seniors is 99.34% (compared to 99.61% in 2016) meaning that 39 current seniors (0.66%) that wanted GME failed to attain it (compared to 21 - 0.39% - in 2016). An additional 47 ( compared to 43 in 2016) did not wish to attain GME this year.

463 current DO seniors scrambled into AOA spots (compared to 535 in 2016), which constitutes 7.8% (compared to ~10% in 2016) of current DO seniors seeking GME this year. Somewhere between 139 and 166 current DO seniors attained positions in the SOAP, representing between 2.3% and 2.8% of current DO seniors. The 10.1% to 10.6% that attained positions in the SOAP or scramble is the majority of the remaining 10.8%-11.3% unmatched seniors that placed.

Conclusions:
-DO match rate appears to have gone up slightly compared to last year. It went up at least 0.3% (at most 2%), and this is pretty consistent with the US MD match rate which went up 0.5%.
-More DOs this year went without a GME position than compared to last year (39 vs 21). This is mostly due to a lower placement rate (99.34% vs. 99.61%) and likely partially due to an overall increase in DO seniors this year compared to last year (5937 vs. 5377 - yes, that is a 560 increase of DO seniors seeking GME in one year).
-More DO seniors SOAPed this year, compared to last year (double - 70). This can mean a couple of things. For one there are more DO seniors. For another, it probably means more DOs accepted positions in the SOAP as opposed to scrambling post-NRMP into an open AOA spot.
-Placement of DOs in AOA programs is down significantly from last year to this year (49% in 2016 to 43% in 2017). In turn the number placing into ACGME positions increased reciprocally from 46% in 2016 to 52% in 2017.
-The number of DO seniors not seeking GME this year went up by 4, but is almost exactly the same percentage of DO seniors as last year (~0.8%), so this isn't a surprise.
-Overall, good job to the class of 2017!


The sources of this data can be found here:
-AACOM placement report - http://www.aacom.org/docs/default-s...-grad-placements-in-2017-matches.pdf?sfvrsn=8
-NRMP match report - http://www.nrmp.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Main-Match-Results-and-Data-2017.pdf

One of your points mentions that with an intern year and full COMLEX series, that a DO grad can attain a medical license to practice in more than 30 states. Are you sure this is true? What more does a DO student have to do to get practice rights in all 50 states? Take USMLE? I doubt that number is correct.
Thanks for posting nonetheless.


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hallowmann

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One of your points mentions that with an intern year and full COMLEX series, that a DO grad can attain a medical license to practice in more than 30 states. Are you sure this is true? What more does a DO student have to do to get practice rights in all 50 states? Take USMLE? I doubt that number is correct.
Thanks for posting nonetheless.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile

What specifically do you doubt about it? Admittedly, it's been a few years since I looked at the requirements for licensure in all states.

Licensure in all 50 states requires either 2 yrs, 3 yrs, or completion of a residency program along with completion of a licensing board series (COMLEX for DOs, USMLE for MDs).

Keep in mind that there are some caveats. Working for the VA for example, I believe only requires any state medical license, so you could work in a different state with one state's license.

Looking at this: Federation of State Medical Boards

It seems that its something like 35 or so states that only require 1 year of GME for DOs.
 
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Alienman52

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What specifically do you doubt about it? Admittedly, it's been a few years since I looked at the requirements for licensure in all states.

Licensure in all 50 states requires either 2 yrs, 3 yrs, or completion of a residency program along with completion of a licensing board series (COMLEX for DOs, USMLE for MDs).

Keep in mind that there are some caveats. Working for the VA for example, I believe only requires any state medical license, so you could work in a different state with one state's license.

Looking at this: Federation of State Medical Boards

It seems that its something like 35 or so states that only require 1 year of GME for DOs.

I think I misunderstood the metric. I was under the impression that after residency, DOs would be licensed in only 30 or so states. I now see that after one year of residency, DOs can be licensed in 30 states, whereas with a full residency completion, it would be 50 states. Please correct me if my interpretation is still incorrect.


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AnatomyGrey12

One of your points mentions that with an intern year and full COMLEX series, that a DO grad can attain a medical license to practice in more than 30 states. Are you sure this is true? What more does a DO student have to do to get practice rights in all 50 states? Take USMLE? I doubt that number is correct.
Thanks for posting nonetheless.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile

I think I misunderstood the metric. I was under the impression that after residency, DOs would be licensed in only 30 or so states. I now see that after one year of residency, DOs can be licensed in 30 states, whereas with a full residency completion, it would be 50 states. Please correct me if my interpretation is still incorrect.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile

Yeah it means after just an intern year you can get a GP license in 30 states. Can be difficult to get jobs though, a lot of places won't hire someone that isn't BE/BC
 
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hallowmann

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Yeah it means after just an intern year you can get a GP license in 30 states. Can be difficult to get jobs though, a lot of places won't hire someone that isn't BE/BC

This is true. You won't have the options someone with a full residency has and will be significantly limited in terms of hospital privilege (i.e. you won't be able to to get any), etc., but jobs do exist. Unlike a doctor with no GME, having a license can actually get you a job that pays six figures.
 
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I am not sure if this is quite the place to ask this questions, but it is the closest thread I could find.. So I apologize in advance if this is question has been answered in a separate thread.

From my understanding the AOA positions are only available to DO students only up until 2020, that being said there are AOA position that go unfilled even after the scramble. In theory a DO student could then attempt to match ACGME and fall back on unfilled AOA spots that are not available to MD students? Is that correct? And if it is, how were there still 39 students without a residency position?
 

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I am not sure if this is quite the place to ask this questions, but it is the closest thread I could find.. So I apologize in advance if this is question has been answered in a separate thread.

From my understanding the AOA positions are only available to DO students only up until 2020, that being said there are AOA position that go unfilled even after the scramble. In theory a DO student could then attempt to match ACGME and fall back on unfilled AOA spots that are not available to MD students? Is that correct? And if it is, how were there still 39 students without a residency position?

Probably either 1) the students didn’t want those spots (mostly FM and IM) 2) some potential huge red flag where no one would want this student (I’ve heard some pretty BAD stories and wonder “will this person get a residency ANYWHERE”) and I’m sure a million other “what if’s”

But I think what you’re trying to allude to is did they not match because of a lack of residency slots for each student and the answer is no. There are currently enough spots for each student, so the reason they didn’t match had to be something else.
 
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Probably either 1) the students didn’t want those spots (mostly FM and IM) 2) some potential huge red flag where no one would want this student (I’ve heard some pretty BAD stories and wonder “will this person get a residency ANYWHERE”) and I’m sure a million other “what if’s”

But I think what you’re trying to allude to is did they not match because of a lack of residency slots for each student and the answer is no. There are currently enough spots for each student, so the reason they didn’t match had to be something else.

Thank you so much for the response, and yes that was what I was getting to. I am glad to hear that there are enough residency spots for each student. That would be the biggest nightmare to me, if you went through 4 years of schooling, gathered 200k of debt and couldn't work as a physician.

Thanks you!
 
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I am not sure if this is quite the place to ask this questions, but it is the closest thread I could find.. So I apologize in advance if this is question has been answered in a separate thread.

From my understanding the AOA positions are only available to DO students only up until 2020, that being said there are AOA position that go unfilled even after the scramble. In theory a DO student could then attempt to match ACGME and fall back on unfilled AOA spots that are not available to MD students? Is that correct? And if it is, how were there still 39 students without a residency position?

People being unrealistic and/or lazy.
 

hallowmann

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I am not sure if this is quite the place to ask this questions, but it is the closest thread I could find.. So I apologize in advance if this is question has been answered in a separate thread.

From my understanding the AOA positions are only available to DO students only up until 2020, that being said there are AOA position that go unfilled even after the scramble. In theory a DO student could then attempt to match ACGME and fall back on unfilled AOA spots that are not available to MD students? Is that correct? And if it is, how were there still 39 students without a residency position?

To be fair, most of the "best" leftover spots are filled by the week after the ACGME match. Programs have their pick of desperate DO students with any range of stats at that time. The 39 either had major red flags (we're talking multiple board failures, not just one, professionalism issues, etc.), didn't want to go to a TRI program in the middle of nowhere, or just gave up.

You should keep in mind that year after year there is a ~0.5% of DO seniors that end up in this boat. If you really want a place and go after something, its unlikely you'll end up in that position.
 
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