ronaldo23

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I imagine you can't be learning everything in the realm of cosmetic and reconstructive surgery in only a few years. Especially since there are constantly new surgeries/techniques that will evolve after you graduate. Do most PS then only offer specific procedures that they are very comfortable with doing, or do some start a practice where they offer dozens and dozens of cosmetic surgeries?
 

Moravian

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I imagine you can't be learning everything in the realm of cosmetic and reconstructive surgery in only a few years. Especially since there are constantly new surgeries/techniques that will evolve after you graduate.
That's way the educational process never really ends.

I think that plastic surgery, more so than some other surgical specialties, is more about learning technique than specific operations. If you know how to raise one type of flap, then you know (hopefully) about flap design, dissection of a pedicle, inset and secondary modification. If you need another flap, you go to the books, maybe ask one of your partners for input, and then go to the OR.

Some of it is just asking what you see yourself doing every day. There are those that only do a few operations, and there are those that do a wide variety of operations. But even within a narrow practice scope, you still can't learn everything in residency. It's a lifelong commitment.
 

droliver

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I think most people tend to drop the things that require more infrastructure to support then a small practice easily manages.

- peds/craniofacial (most is now done thru dedicated tertiary networks now)

- hand surgery beyond carpal tunnel/trigger finger/dupeytren contractures (if you don't have the inhouse PT/OT & xray capability in your practice this becomes suboptimal)

- microsurgery

- medium to large burns

- eyelid reconstruction and ectropion surgery
 

maxheadroom

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I think most people tend to drop the things that require more infrastructure to support then a small practice easily manages.

- peds/craniofacial (most is now done thru dedicated tertiary networks now)

- hand surgery beyond carpal tunnel/trigger finger/dupeytren contractures (if you don't have the inhouse PT/OT & xray capability in your practice this becomes suboptimal)

- microsurgery

- medium to large burns

- eyelid reconstruction and ectropion surgery
In general, I agree with Ollie. I'll just add the caveat that Hand Surgery stuff (minus the bony work which does necessitate onsite X-ray) is pretty office friendly. Things like nerve releases rarely require an X-ray (except for the CMC arthritis contributing to CTS). Onsite PT/OT is nice, but not necessary (although lots of PT/OT groups will send a therapist to clinic if you're high-volume enough for them to bill consistently).

I totally agree on the Peds thing. I didn't commit to seven years of training to be a Veterinarian!
 

maxheadroom

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Oh yeah, gotta love my workman's comp peeps! They don't bother me too much. "Sorry, but I can't keep you off work for that. I'll give you restrictions, but you have to go to work. And no more narcotics. Enjoy your Lyrica."

I just can't take the parents on Peds stuff.