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Johnny Appleseed

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Updated spreadsheet on the tuition of each DO school and the average graduate indebtedness of each graduating class. All the info is from the CIB, link is posted below.

https://www.aacom.org/docs/default-source/cib/aacom-cib-2018-front-schools.pdf?sfvrsn=2

Tuition.PNG
 

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Scrubb

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CCOM and AZCOM tuition are even higher now; very close to $68k and $66k, respectively. Scary stuff...
 

AnxietyNation

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Wow, that Texas tuition though. Wishing I was from the Lone Star State right about now.
 
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deleted600623

How the hell does it make sense that tuition has no regulation but everyone wants to regulate what physicians make?? Seems a** backward to me
 
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goilers

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I'm confused as to why William Cary COM has one of the lower yearly tuitions, but the highest graduating indebtedness??
 

CoomassieBlue57

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I'm confused as to why William Cary COM has one of the lower yearly tuitions, but the highest graduating indebtedness??

WC-COM Estimated annual room, board, books, and living costs: $30,000 (+ tuition: $39,800). The indebteness number factors in scholarships, students that are able to pay tuition via saved money or parents, students that don't take out the total allowed room/board/CoL, etc.
 
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LukeCage

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ATSU-SOMA 315K... :nailbiting:
 
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Cath Up

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You're killing it, Johnny! This is informative.

Random, but I always remembered how ICOM pledged for their tuition to be below average. No matter how you measure it, their tuition is not below average.

All tuitions (in state + out of state): 47,250
Out of state: 49,330
In state: 45,170
ICOM: 49,750
 

Osminog

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How the hell does it make sense that tuition has no regulation but everyone wants to regulate what physicians make?? Seems a** backward to me

Well, policies that regulate physician salary would indirectly regulate medical school tuition costs. After all, if the payoff for becoming a physician decreases, then people will not be as willing to invest in a medical education.
 

Osminog

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You're killing it, Johnny! This is informative.

Random, but I always remembered how ICOM pledged for their tuition to be below average. No matter how you measure it, their tuition is not below average.

All tuitions (in state + out of state): 47,250
Out of state: 49,330
In state: 45,170
ICOM: 49,750

No. ICOM pledged that "tuition costs will be lower than the average for private osteopathic or allopathic medical schools." So neither out-of-state nor in-state tuition costs for public osteopathic schools should be factored into your calculations.
 
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Mr. Saigon

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Cost of Living in Phoenix isn't exactly low :p

Actually, it's not that bad in comparison to other big cities. ;) And AT-Still is in Mesa and that typically runs a bit lower than the actual city of Phx.

Thinking more about it, I think the relocation of students to Chicago, D.C., etc., is the culprit...
 

Stagg737

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Well, policies that regulate physician salary would indirectly regulate medical school tuition costs. After all, if the payoff for becoming a physician decreases, then people will not be as willing to invest in a medical education.

In a logical world, that's what would happen. However, as long as fed loans exist and there are naive pre-meds entering med school with the mentality of "this is my passion, I'd do it for free!" without understanding the commitment required just to get a real paycheck or how money in the real world works, med schools (and colleges in general) will continue to milk students for all the money they can get. There'd have to be a dramatic drop in physician pay for this to actually happen, and even then the policy change would have to come from the top down as I don't think most pre-meds are aware or mature enough to actually enact that change themselves.
 

Magus5454

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Actually, it's not that bad in comparison to other big cities. ;) And AT-Still is in Mesa and that typically runs a bit lower than the actual city of Phx.

Thinking more about it, I think the relocation of students to Chicago, D.C., etc., is the culprit...
I was just basing it on when I'd visit my aunt in El Mirage
 
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