Does a "top residency program" matter if i'm not interested in academics?

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I just want to be a clinician. I don't really have much interest in research.

If this is the case, would going to a top program be a significant advantage?

I'm sure it would make me more marketable to jobs and stuff I guess. Is there a big difference in salary?

Basically, I want to have the job of a doctor, but once you are in academics and as you become more well known, it becomes more your life. I want to practice, but I also want to have significant time to spend with my family.
 

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hmm this is very curious then. i have always thought that i wanted to work as hard as i can to land the best residency possible... but i just want to be a regular doctor in whatever town im in and have a comfortable and humble life.

i guess if i wanted to do derm, thats different... but again, it doesn't matter what residency program i go to for derm if i just want to be a dermatologist
 
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MilkmanAl

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I'd guess that a top residency program - speaking in terms of prestige - would make you marginally more employable, but most people within a field are perfectly aware of which programs typically afford the best training. In other words, if you're not into academics, people will know that your Arkansas pediatrics residency prepared you pretty well to be a clinician, whereas going to CHOP or some other big-name children's hospital would be a much better idea if you wanted to break into research. In your case, the "best residency possible" will be one that combines excellent training, location, connections, and whatever other factors you're interested in. Prestige doesn't have to play nearly as big of a role as it would if you were the academic type.
 

Perrotfish

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I just want to be a clinician. I don't really have much interest in research.

If this is the case, would going to a top program be a significant advantage?

I'm sure it would make me more marketable to jobs and stuff I guess. Is there a big difference in salary?

Basically, I want to have the job of a doctor, but once you are in academics and as you become more well known, it becomes more your life. I want to practice, but I also want to have significant time to spend with my family.

It can matter in terms of securing a competitive fellowships. There are lots of people who go through residency and find out that they're particularly interested in a fellowship in cardiology, plastic surgery, or whetever. If you're sure you don't want a competitive fellowship then it shouldn't matter much: your pay is mainly determined by the kind of residency you completed, the hours you work, where you live, what kind of practice you join, etc. I guess if you wanted to join a pretigious private practice group a better brand name residency could also help, but I don't know how important that is on your resume.
 

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Yeah in my opinion connections are probably way more important in joining a prestigious private practice group... or just being incredible lol
 

neusu

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Makes no difference if you want to go in to PP. As long as you are board certified and licensed you there are jobs that pay very well, no matter what field you are in or what residency program you graduate from. Program prestige matters for academics and for your own ego stroking.
 

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oh never knew that thanks

Happy to help, but my point was that you'd probably have an easier time joining an elite practice by successfully gunning for a top residency/fellowship program than by leaving it to who you know or what you can do.

I've seen private practice ads making it known that they've just added a Hopkins trained whatever to their staff.
 
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Makes no difference if you want to go in to PP. As long as you are board certified and licensed you there are jobs that pay very well, no matter what field you are in or what residency program you graduate from. Program prestige matters for academics and for your own ego stroking.

I would disagree. I trained at an elite program and also spent a few years at a large military Hospital with an anesthesia residency. It was fully accredited and had the full spectrum of services available. The difference could not have been bigger. The big name program had pathology overflowing from every OR every day. "Famous" faculty surgeons attracted the sickest and most complex patients from all over the world. If you can handle these train wrecks day in and day out you can handle the average disaster with ease. The large military referral center couldn't hold a candle to a world class medical center. It was the definition of average, and superior teaching isn't going to make up for less experience from an easier case load. Where do you want to train, the place that meets the minimum numbers required for training or the place where you double or triple your minimum index cases with ease. It is absolutely no exaggeration to say that my average day at the big house was harder than the most challenging days at the Navy Hospital. There are always going to be disaster patients, septic, having an MI, ruptured aneurysm on call, etc, but what's the average day? What pathology are you having to deal with? No comparison. This distinction may be more important for the surgical crowd, probably most specialties actually, but its real. Also, the big name programs are usually very large, this helps when you're looking for a sweet PP job, you probably already have a connection there from your program. That guy can call his pal back at your place and get an honest assessment of your ability and potential. Of course there are also plenty of hidden gem programs out there for your field with great regional reputations for clinical excellence. The challenge is to find out where they are. Its not all about the big name programs.
Don't aim to be average. That's my advice. Even if your goal is some PP job in the sticks.
 
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Law2Doc

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Happy to help, but my point was that you'd probably have an easier time joining an elite practice by successfully gunning for a top residency/fellowship program than by leaving it to who you know or what you can do.

I've seen private practice ads making it known that they've just added a Hopkins trained whatever to their staff.

Agreed. Private practices still like to see good CVs when they hire, just like any professional employer. Doesn't have to be a top academic center, per se, but they at least like to see well respected regional residency programs they are familiar with or places they know crank out good clinicians. Working hard let's you choose amongst residency programs, and having a choice is always valuable. While connections are huge, you can't bank on having them.

Far too many med students on here take the position that they don't want to work hard because they claim they don't care about specialty or going into academics etc. Sorry but life rewards those who put in the effort. Doesn't matter if you think you want FM or PP etc. There is no coasting if you want to have input in your career.
 

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The reason I made this topic is because I worry a lot. I think I would always try my hardest no matter what. But usually, after an exam or something, even knowing that i missed a few gets me really worried for no reason.. until grades come out. And then, even if I didn't do great, I am able to forget about it.

It is just the worrying that bothers me.
 
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Zero. Salary is determined by what insurance companies allot per number of patients you see/procedures you do/notes you write. Last I heard, insurance companies don't prorate based on your CV.

True, but if you trained at some marginal residency, you might have trouble securing a place in the premium group that has the best contracts and brings in the most $$.
Something to consider.
 

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As has been mentioned you need to see pathology - reading about it isn't the same taking care of a patient with said pathology. Training at a "top center" will matter more in some specialties than others. In my opinion general IM does not require a top program, not at all. Though a tertiary/quatrinary referral center would be preferrable even if it's not a top 10 place.
 
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True, but if you trained at some marginal residency, you might have trouble securing a place in the premium group that has the best contracts and brings in the most $$.
Something to consider.


yes, but the choice is never between a top 5 program and a marginal community center.

It is usually more top 5 mecca somewhere you don't want to live vs mid-tier academic center somewhere you want to live (say, Duke vs USC)
 
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