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Does anyone regret going into RADS?

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Darwinism

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So I'm just about to complete MS3, and have been going for rads since day 1. I talked to the program director today at my number 1, and he said I have a very good shot at getting in. But for some reason, I'm now finding myself wondering if I would get sick of the steady inflow of studies to read, the hefty book reading load, and the long 6 years through fellowship. I also wonder if I would miss seeing patients or just walking around the hospital even, whatever. Don't get me wrong, I still think rads is bad ass, and most all of the staff/residents are cool, but of course the beast salary is obviously enticing. And I like rocking a clean ass white coat.

So I was just wondering, can anyone shed some truth on me about what it's like being a pgy3-6 rads resident, the good, the bad, and the ****ing monotonous that you MAY.....or MAY NOT feel about the field? Also, your thoughts on the current job market, although it's impossible to predict 7 years from now.

Thanks,
Ya boy
 

2324tigers

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So I'm just about to complete MS3, and have been going for rads since day 1. I talked to the program director today at my number 1, and he said I have a very good shot at getting in. But for some reason, I'm now finding myself wondering if I would get sick of the steady inflow of studies to read, the hefty book reading load, and the long 6 years through fellowship. I also wonder if I would miss seeing patients or just walking around the hospital even, whatever. Don't get me wrong, I still think rads is bad ass, and most all of the staff/residents are cool, but of course the beast salary is obviously enticing. And I like rocking a clean ass white coat.

So I was just wondering, can anyone shed some truth on me about what it's like being a pgy3-6 rads resident, the good, the bad, and the ******* monotonous that you MAY.....or MAY NOT feel about the field? Also, your thoughts on the current job market, although it's impossible to predict 7 years from now.

Thanks,
Ya boy

That's cool that you're a third year and already have a number one.
 
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RadiologyRank2014

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So I'm just about to complete MS3, and have been going for rads since day 1. I talked to the program director today at my number 1

Don't let the haters tear you down. As a current 4th year eagerly awaiting match results next week, I've been told by almost everyone, every single year, that I didn't know what I was talking about by choosing radiology before medical school and knowing what my #1 school was super early. And they ended up being sooooo right. My #1 choice slipped all the way down to #2 after going on 15 interviews.

Only you can decide if radiology is for you after shadowing and being exposed to the field. Residency is very temporary in the grand scheme of things.
 
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cbtk18

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I am currently an intern doing a medicine year and I thank God every day that I made the choice to go into radiology. It would matter if it paid $1M/year, the mere thought of being an internal medicine doctor (or ER) for the rest of my life makes me momentarily suicidal. They could slash radiology fees in half and I will still be just fine with my job. Maybe a surgical specialty would be ok, but I still know that I made a wise choice by going into rads.
 
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Darwinism

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Thanks for your responses. I appreciate the advice and not the snide ass remarks SDN is full of sometimes.
In general I can be very indecisive at times, especially about life changing decisions, so I really like to research and ask as much as I can
beforehand. Honestly though, I have only met 1 rads fellow that absolutely hated it, and wished he had chosen a different field. He said that reading images everyday was monotonous, boring, and unexciting.

Nonetheless, thanks again for the input,
Ya Boy
 
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radman123

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Seasoned attending here. Your optimism and enthusiasm is refreshing. Radiology has been in a job market rut for the last 5-6 years. This not only impacts trainees coming out but current radiologists and their working conditions and stability. This may change in 6-7 years, but it may not. Reimbursements are going down every year. Right now going into radiology is risky. There is nothing being done about the bad job market by leadership. There is a lot of abuse out there, especially as you get closer to the desirable metros. There is also a trend for hospital employment and takeover of traditional rad groups by corporations which leads to unfavorable working conditions.

In the end, you will get a job but for much less money than you see in the averages. The averages include seasoned rads in private partnerships which will be scarce when you come out, especially in desirable areas. You will have less job stability. You may have to move far from where you want to live. The return on investment will be much lower for 6 and possibly 7 years of training after med school. The volume demands in many places will take all the enjoyment out of the field. The weekends, nights, evenings, holidays have become a mainstay of radiology. Lifestyle field perhaps 20 years ago when after hours CT and MRI were rare. Still, if you do not like seeing patients and working in traditional clinical medicine, radiology is better than the alternatives.
 
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penguinophile

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PGY-4 here. I have never regretted doing rads. I can't imagine doing a different speciality. The job market sucks, and the future is a little scary, but at the end of the day when I am either doing my procedures or diagnostic work I am content.
 
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auburnO5

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Seasoned attending here. Your optimism and enthusiasm is refreshing. Radiology has been in a job market rut for the last 5-6 years. This not only impacts trainees coming out but current radiologists and their working conditions and stability. This may change in 6-7 years, but it may not. Reimbursements are going down every year. Right now going into radiology is risky. There is nothing being done about the bad job market by leadership. There is a lot of abuse out there, especially as you get closer to the desirable metros. There is also a trend for hospital employment and takeover of traditional rad groups by corporations which leads to unfavorable working conditions.

In the end, you will get a job but for much less money than you see in the averages. The averages include seasoned rads in private partnerships which will be scarce when you come out, especially in desirable areas. You will have less job stability. You may have to move far from where you want to live. The return on investment will be much lower for 6 and possibly 7 years of training after med school. The volume demands in many places will take all the enjoyment out of the field. The weekends, nights, evenings, holidays have become a mainstay of radiology. Lifestyle field perhaps 20 years ago when after hours CT and MRI were rare. Still, if you do not like seeing patients and working in traditional clinical medicine, radiology is better than the alternatives.

You must be depressed and hate your life. All 35 of your posts are extremely negative towards radiology. I know everything isn't unicorns and rainbows, but C'MON MAN....
 
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shark2000

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Relatively new to pp. Just become a partner. Worked well for me. I know there are some bad groups out there that has become more common recently. I was lucky to end up in a good group.
Volume is crazy high. The money is good. Is exhausting and annoying at times, but most of it is good. It has become easier recently, since I am getting better and fast. Overall, a satisfying job though not as exciting as residency or fellowship. I like many aspects of it. However, if you pay what I make now, I am totally fine to quit my job since I have many other interests in life.

Monotonous: Yes to some extent. Everything in life will become monotonous. The good things will become routine, the bad parts will stay or become worse. It is like a new girl.

If I wanted to do it again, I would choose the same. Other fields that I would consider seriously are Derm and Ophtho. If you are into hardcore surgery, do ortho. Forget about GS or anesthesia. If for any reason you do IM, do GI. Forget about hospitalist.
 
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Silent Cool

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Relatively new to pp. Just become a partner. Worked well for me. I know there are some bad groups out there that has become more common recently. I was lucky to end up in a good group.
Volume is crazy high. The money is good. Is exhausting and annoying at times, but most of it is good. It has become easier recently, since I am getting better and fast. Overall, a satisfying job though not as exciting as residency or fellowship. I like many aspects of it. However, if you pay what I make now, I am totally fine to quit my job since I have many other interests in life.

Monotonous: Yes to some extent. Everything in life will become monotonous. The good things will become routine, the bad parts will stay or become worse. It is like a new girl.

If I wanted to do it again, I would choose the same. Other fields that I would consider seriously are Derm and Ophtho. If you are into hardcore surgery, do ortho. Forget about GS or anesthesia. If for any reason you do IM, do GI. Forget about hospitalist.

Hey Shark,

I'm curious why you recommend people avoid hospitalist and anesthesia. I've heard that hospitalist may be a better gig now than doing most of the IM fellowships and that fellowship-trained IM docs have actually gone back to hospitalist work.

thanx
 

anbuitachi

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Hey Shark,

I'm curious why you recommend people avoid hospitalist and anesthesia. I've heard that hospitalist may be a better gig now than doing most of the IM fellowships and that fellowship-trained IM docs have actually gone back to hospitalist work.

thanx


cause anesthesia is going down and hospitalists are miserable.
 
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Silent Cool

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cause anesthesia is going down and hospitalists are miserable.

anbu,

Can you expand a bit? I know there is doom and gloom in anesthesia, but why are hospitalists miserable? what is the typical take-home for hospitalist work? I've head around 200K. Is that realistic? Must one go truly rural to make ~300K as a hospitalist? I've also heard that many fellowship-trained IM docs have gone back to hospitalist work--is this true in your experience or total BS?

thanx
 
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anbuitachi

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anbu,

Can you expand a bit? I know there is doom and gloom in anesthesia, but why are hospitalists miserable? what is the typical take-home for hospitalist work? I've head around 200K. Is that realistic? Must one go truly rural to make ~300K as a hospitalist? I've also heard that many fellowship-trained IM docs have gone back to hospitalist work--is this true in your experience or total BS?

thanx

Look at the medscape surveys, the satisfaction rate for IM is horrible. 20% would choose IM again if possible. Decent hospitalist positions are getting more and more competitive and are harder to come back [make sense cause there are so many IM grads]. They work hard on the job. The hospitalist at the hospital I rotated at said he earns 170k [abt 10 yrs in], working 6 days a week, for 6 weeks, and then 1 week off, and he said it sucks.

I think most major city areas are at mid 100s starting... of course the more rural you go the higher it gets. My attending told me one of his friends got a job in phoenix for 250k
 

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There is also a trend for hospital employment and takeover of traditional rad groups by corporations which leads to unfavorable working conditions.

Don't mean to derail the thread, but wondering if you and/or others would elaborate on this a little. I have heard this several times and don't completely understand.

I am in an area where some of the radiologists are employed by the hospital. Some grumble, but some, especially the younger guys, seem pretty happy about it. They make as much or more than they would in PP fresh out of residency and there is less emphasis on churning out RVUs and insurance and other benefits are provided by the hospital. On the other hand it is easier for the hospitals to appropriately align incentives with optimal patient care, which seems like a pretty reasonable idea.

Everyone on here and AM complain about older PP docs who won't retire and make bank but work little while forcing the young guys to crank out mad RVUs for multiple years while being paid peanuts before they make partner and enjoy the good life.

With bundled payments on the horizon and progressively decreasing reimbursements, radiology is on track to become a money pit instead of the profit generator it has been for so long. The current model seems unsustainable. Not a lot of security in radiology overall but seems like being employed by a hospital who needs someone to interpret studies regardless of the payment structure is a safer bet than trying to increase speed, usually at the cost of quality, so the practice makes as much cash as they did last month while getting paid less per study.

I understand people don't like giving up their independence to a manager or boss, and after 6 or 7 years, there is a lot more money in PP. But for someone fresh out of residency, who doesn't need to make 500k to be happy, being employed by a hospital doesn't seem too bad. Just wondering what I'm missing.
 
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nycitygas

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cause anesthesia is going down and hospitalists are miserable.

I wouldn't say that "anesthesia is going down." The job market is tighter than in the past, but it's still very easy for a new grad without a fellowship to obtain a job paying >320K a year in a desirable city. Will new grads ever make 600K? Very unlikely..but you can definitely do worse in medicine. Gen Surg is also definitely on the upswing.

Hospitalists make 180-280K but the lifestyle is unsustainable for more than a few years. The Optho market in my area is terrible and Derm is too competitive for 99% of the med students out there.

I went on on four interviews and received four great job offers all in nice cities. My rads roomate from med school is finishing up his fellowship with zero offers and is contemplating moving back in with his parents.
 
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Silent Cool

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I wouldn't say that "anesthesia is going down." The job market is tighter than in the past, but it's still very easy for a new grad without a fellowship to obtain a job paying >320K a year in a desirable city. Will new grads ever make 600K? Very unlikely..but you can definitely do worse in medicine. Gen Surg is also definitely on the upswing.

Hospitalists make 180-280K but the lifestyle is unsustainable for more than a few years. The Optho market in my area is terrible and Derm is too competitive for 99% of the med students out there.

I went on on four interviews and received four great job offers all in nice cities. My rads roomate from med school is finishing up his fellowship with zero offers and is contemplating moving back in with his parents.


Wow. Sham-wow.
 
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Silent Cool

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Look at the medscape surveys, the satisfaction rate for IM is horrible. 20% would choose IM again if possible. Decent hospitalist positions are getting more and more competitive and are harder to come back [make sense cause there are so many IM grads]. They work hard on the job. The hospitalist at the hospital I rotated at said he earns 170k [abt 10 yrs in], working 6 days a week, for 6 weeks, and then 1 week off, and he said it sucks.

I think most major city areas are at mid 100s starting... of course the more rural you go the higher it gets. My attending told me one of his friends got a job in phoenix for 250k

anbu,

thanx for the heads-up anecdotes. 'preciate it.
-sc
 

Silent Cool

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I wouldn't say that "anesthesia is going down." The job market is tighter than in the past, but it's still very easy for a new grad without a fellowship to obtain a job paying >320K a year in a desirable city. Will new grads ever make 600K? Very unlikely..but you can definitely do worse in medicine. Gen Surg is also definitely on the upswing.

Hospitalists make 180-280K but the lifestyle is unsustainable for more than a few years. The Optho market in my area is terrible and Derm is too competitive for 99% of the med students out there.

I went on on four interviews and received four great job offers all in nice cities. My rads roomate from med school is finishing up his fellowship with zero offers and is contemplating moving back in with his parents.

I have heard this, too. For many years G-surg has apparently taken it up the chuff. It's about time they get more $$$. Second, I have also heard that gen surg docs can do ~12-hour trauma shifts and do very well.

True?

thanx
 

colbgw02

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Don't mean to derail the thread, but wondering if you and/or others would elaborate on this a little. I have heard this several times and don't completely understand.

I am in an area where some of the radiologists are employed by the hospital. Some grumble, but some, especially the younger guys, seem pretty happy about it. They make as much or more than they would in PP fresh out of residency and there is less emphasis on churning out RVUs and insurance and other benefits are provided by the hospital. On the other hand it is easier for the hospitals to appropriately align incentives with optimal patient care, which seems like a pretty reasonable idea.

Everyone on here and AM complain about older PP docs who won't retire and make bank but work little while forcing the young guys to crank out mad RVUs for multiple years while being paid peanuts before they make partner and enjoy the good life.

With bundled payments on the horizon and progressively decreasing reimbursements, radiology is on track to become a money pit instead of the profit generator it has been for so long. The current model seems unsustainable. Not a lot of security in radiology overall but seems like being employed by a hospital who needs someone to interpret studies regardless of the payment structure is a safer bet than trying to increase speed, usually at the cost of quality, so the practice makes as much cash as they did last month while getting paid less per study.

I understand people don't like giving up their independence to a manager or boss, and after 6 or 7 years, there is a lot more money in PP. But for someone fresh out of residency, who doesn't need to make 500k to be happy, being employed by a hospital doesn't seem too bad. Just wondering what I'm missing.

I think you're onto something.

The employment model favors younger radiologists vis-a-vis salary, and it has the potential to make for a better lifestyle. I think some people lament the loss of the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow that generally comes with making partner at a well run group. And obviously someone who has already made partner doesn't have too many reasons to be an employee.

Job security is +/-. A hospital can fire you (or the whole department) pretty easily, whereas getting kicked out of a partnership is difficult. But groups can and do dissolve if they lose a hospital contract, so it cuts both ways.
 

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I have worked in both partnerships and employee models. With an employee model, you give up control over many things. Your pay is lower than what you produce and can go lower on a whim of an administrator. You have much less job security. Less motivation. Lower morale. Little say in how things work. This is my experience having worked in both.

"My rads roomate from med school is finishing up his fellowship with zero offers and is contemplating moving back in with his parents."

If really true, a waste of tax payer dollars, a waste of human effort, and a true tragedy for that individual. That outcome could have been achieved with far less effort and money! Still, medical students are taking risks by going into radiology despite hearing anecdotes like these. Not only is the job market down, but the quality of jobs that exist is very poor in general. Coming out of training making even 200k sounds like becoming rich for a fellow. But boy, where will you live and how incredibly hard will you work for that money will be a nice surprise. The potential for abuse in this field is very great, particularly in places like the metros.
 

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Totally agree that hospital employment is counterintuitive. Much less motivation. However job security depends on your contract. For example, VA jobs or Kaiser or academics are considered employment, but has a lot of job security. Unfortunately most of healthcare is going towards hospital employment that is not really good in the long run.
 

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Do not know much about va and kaiser, but academics around where I am is 1 year rolling contracts with 90 day with/without cause cancellations. Not my definition of security. Have heard of recent lay offs in academic places.
 

DrBowtie

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Do not know much about va and kaiser, but academics around where I am is 1 year rolling contracts with 90 day with/without cause cancellations. Not my definition of security. Have heard of recent lay offs in academic places.
For comparison, what are some examples of hospital contract terms with PP groups?
How often are those reopened for bids/negotiation?
 

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Totally agree that hospital employment is counterintuitive. Much less motivation. However job security depends on your contract. For example, VA jobs or Kaiser or academics are considered employment, but has a lot of job security. Unfortunately most of healthcare is going towards hospital employment that is not really good in the long run.

Thanks for all the replies. I think we can safely toss out the argument for job security. Otherwise haven't seen many more tangible arguments for why the employment model is so inherently bad.

Less motivation... For what? Generating as many RVUs as possible? Less emphasis on volume seems like a good idea honestly.. Continued expansion of volume to make up for declining reimbursements seems both unsustainable and self-defeating. Faster interpretations undermine their difficulty - "it's ok if you pay us less, we'll just work faster." Not to mention capitation... If that really happens the emphasis will have to shift from RVUs to value added, otherwise we are going to work ourselves out of jobs. "I can read 100 studies in a day but I don't have time to answer questions or look at the indication or provide anything more than a generic templated interpretation." Demand will disappear while supply increases exponentially with more graduating trainees and everyone reading faster. Anyway I digress...

I ask these questions in all sincerity. I'm admittedly young and naive both in age and in training, but the employment model just doesn't seem like such a bad gig and I'm curious why all the vitriol.
 

bronx43

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If I wanted to do it again, I would choose the same. Other fields that I would consider seriously are Derm and Ophtho. If you are into hardcore surgery, do ortho. Forget about GS or anesthesia. If for any reason you do IM, do GI. Forget about hospitalist.
Add on heme/onc, pulmonary/CC, and allergy for IM. Most people don't realize this, but pulmonary/critical care has quietly become the hidden gem for IM subspecialties. Becoming more and more in demand as hospitals are abandoning their hospitalist-run ICU models and going for closed ICUs. All the third year fellows right now are knee deep in interviews around the country, and starting salaries are averaging 350k for week on/off schedule with potential for far more if you cover clinic.

Heme onc and allergy are self explanatory and I think most med students realize this.
 

nycitygas

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Pure intensivist jobs are out there in abundance. Salary is roughly 150/hr for 14-16 shifts a month in nice cities which works out to about 310-320K a year + good benefits. It's very tough work though and I do not believe doing pure ICU work is sustainable for a life long career. Expect to work 7-8 nights a month and every other weekend.

Allergy/IM had some pretty big reimbursement cuts lately...Not the cash cow it once was. My friends dads practice in BFE hired a doctor for less than 200K so I expect the starting salary in the metros to be even lower.
 
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bronx43

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Pure intensivist jobs are out there in abundance. Salary is roughly 150/hr for 14-16 shifts a month in nice cities which works out to about 310-320K a year + good benefits. It's very tough work though and I do not believe doing pure ICU work is sustainable for a life long career. Expect to work 7-8 nights a month and every other weekend.

Allergy/IM had some pretty big reimbursement cuts lately...Not the cash cow it once was. My friends dads practice in BFE hired a doctor for less than 200K so I expect the starting salary in the metros to be even lower.
I'm not aware of any big reimbursement cuts for allergy. If there is, then it's most likely regional, and my region hasn't gotten hit. Job market for allergy is crap, and that's why starting salaries are so low. However, the demand is still very high as most allergists in mid-tier cities are booked a few months out. The problem is that most new grads don't have the balls to take a risk and start their own practice. Most rather just take the guaranteed $160-200k and work their 35 hours a week with little to no outside work.

As far as critical care, you're right in that it isn't sustainable. That's why it's good to be pulmonary trained. I don't know much about the market in NYC, LA, or Boston, but a couple fellows just landed gigs where they rotate a week in the ICU (then week off), then a week in clinic (then week off), then week on consults (then week off), then week on nights. Both starting salaries were aroun $375k. I think one was in Dallas or something.
 

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Allergy offices for the most part make their money off weekly allergy shots. The insurance carriers in my area have drastically cut their reimbursements for shots. The practices might be booked out for 3 months, but they are basically primary care offices at this point and aren't much more profitable. My local internist is booked months out as well and I'ld very surprised if he made more than 200k.

I know several Pulm/CC physicians in private practice in Dallas who make roughly 350K a year but work much more than the above described schedule. Pulm Clinic/consults/Bronchs do not reimburse well at least in comparison to GI scopes or Caths.
 

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Pure intensivist jobs are out there in abundance. Salary is roughly 150/hr for 14-16 shifts a month in nice cities which works out to about 310-320K a year + good benefits. It's very tough work though and I do not believe doing pure ICU work is sustainable for a life long career. Expect to work 7-8 nights a month and every other weekend.

Allergy/IM had some pretty big reimbursement cuts lately...Not the cash cow it once was. My friends dads practice in BFE hired a doctor for less than 200K so I expect the starting salary in the metros to be even lower.

Allergy is popular due to the lifestyle. A complete outpatient specialty with no pager needed.
Patient population also tends to be better, more thankful, and more up-scale.
 
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DermViser

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Hey Shark,

I'm curious why you recommend people avoid hospitalist and anesthesia. I've heard that hospitalist may be a better gig now than doing most of the IM fellowships and that fellowship-trained IM docs have actually gone back to hospitalist work.

thanx

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:
 

bronx43

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Allergy offices for the most part make their money off weekly allergy shots. The insurance carriers in my area have drastically cut their reimbursements for shots. The practices might be booked out for 3 months, but they are basically primary care offices at this point and aren't much more profitable. My local internist is booked months out as well and I'ld very surprised if he made more than 200k.

I know several Pulm/CC physicians in private practice in Dallas who make roughly 350K a year but work much more than the above described schedule. Pulm Clinic/consults/Bronchs do not reimburse well at least in comparison to GI scopes or Caths.
Sounds like being a physician around your area is just a bad idea in general... I guess not unexpected for a big city. I'm in a mid-sized city in the Midwest and our allergists are still doing really well. A guy particular in town started up 3 years ago and has like 5 offices and hires a bunch of midlevels. He's raking in some serious dough. But, you're right overall. It's only gonna go down for all physicians from here on out. No one is safe (except maybe derm).
 

anbuitachi

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Sounds like being a physician around your area is just a bad idea in general... I guess not unexpected for a big city. I'm in a mid-sized city in the Midwest and our allergists are still doing really well. A guy particular in town started up 3 years ago and has like 5 offices and hires a bunch of midlevels. He's raking in some serious dough. But, you're right overall. It's only gonna go down for all physicians from here on out. No one is safe (except maybe derm).

I dont know much about allergy market in general, but whenever i go to my allergist every couple of weeks for my shots... she complains to me about how bad everything is and how she is barely breaking even with recent medicaid cuts [not sure which ones she was talking about]. she became so disappointed that she quit her other job in the hospital and proceeded to work 3 times a week in her clinic..... she said at the current rate she'd rather just use the time to be w/ her family. though shes only been in the field for ~15 yrs
 

anbuitachi

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I'm not aware of any big reimbursement cuts for allergy. If there is, then it's most likely regional, and my region hasn't gotten hit. Job market for allergy is crap, and that's why starting salaries are so low. However, the demand is still very high as most allergists in mid-tier cities are booked a few months out. The problem is that most new grads don't have the balls to take a risk and start their own practice. Most rather just take the guaranteed $160-200k and work their 35 hours a week with little to no outside work.

As far as critical care, you're right in that it isn't sustainable. That's why it's good to be pulmonary trained. I don't know much about the market in NYC, LA, or Boston, but a couple fellows just landed gigs where they rotate a week in the ICU (then week off), then a week in clinic (then week off), then week on consults (then week off), then week on nights. Both starting salaries were aroun $375k. I think one was in Dallas or something.

that sounds crazy high, though the reported critical care work 66 hours a week i believe.. which is ridiculously lot
 

bronx43

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I dont know much about allergy market in general, but whenever i go to my allergist every couple of weeks for my shots... she complains to me about how bad everything is and how she is barely breaking even with recent medicaid cuts [not sure which ones she was talking about]. she became so disappointed that she quit her other job in the hospital and proceeded to work 3 times a week in her clinic..... she said at the current rate she'd rather just use the time to be w/ her family. though shes only been in the field for ~15 yrs
Huh? She became so disappointed in allergy that she quit her hospital allergy job and is now only working 3 days a week in clinic? This doesn't make any sense.
 

nycitygas

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Sounds like being a physician around your area is just a bad idea in general... I guess not unexpected for a big city. I'm in a mid-sized city in the Midwest and our allergists are still doing really well. A guy particular in town started up 3 years ago and has like 5 offices and hires a bunch of midlevels. He's raking in some serious dough. But, you're right overall. It's only gonna go down for all physicians from here on out. No one is safe (except maybe derm).

Mid-sized cities in the midwest are still great places for physicians. I wish my family situation worked out that I could move there but it looks like its just a dream.

Pure critical care intensivists do not work 66 hours a week. Its more like 42-48 hours. It's not a bad gig but unfortunately pays 30% less than ER which I find insulting.
 

bronx43

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I think its cause she can control her hours in her clinic.
I'm saying it doesn't make sense that she even has a "hospital job." There are no hospital based allergists. And if things are so bad, why is she only working 3 days a week? If 3 days a week is MORE than what she was doing, then did she even work before she moved from the "hospital job?"
 
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anbuitachi

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I'm saying it doesn't make sense that she even has a "hospital job." There are no hospital based allergists. And if things are so bad, why is she only working 3 days a week? If 3 days a week is MORE than what she was doing, then did she even work before she moved from the "hospital job?"

It's less. She decided that working more wasn't worth it lol cause she wasn't making that much. So instead she crams her patients into 3 days. She has no loans (foreign grad) and she said now she believes being w/ family is worth more than trying to make >100k.
 

DermViser

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It's less. She decided that working more wasn't worth it lol cause she wasn't making that much. So instead she crams her patients into 3 days. She has no loans (foreign grad) and she said now she believes being w/ family is worth more than trying to make >100k.

Oh, so she went for Allergy when it wasn't competitive.
 
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orangejello

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i wish i would have gone into derm and troll all of the other forums about how their specialties are worse than mine
 
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DermViser

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i wish i would have gone into derm and troll all of the other forums about how their specialties are worse than mine

Please tell me where I posted where I say that all specialties are worse than Derm. It is very true - when Allergy/Immunology first started out, there wasn't as much competition initially starting out. It is now one of the most competitive subspecialties of Internal Medicine. I haven't said anything bad about the specialty of Radiology which is an excellent choice and continues to attract top medical students for good reason.
 

TheRadiologist

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Have been in private practice for over two decades. I have no regrets. I work very hard when I am working. Weekend call is especially intense, but we get a lot of time off and make very good money.
 
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Baller MD

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nvm
 
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