Does graduate level biochemistry count towards the pre-req?

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You're My Boy Blue

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I have not taken biochem as an undergraduate but will be taking it at the graduate level (should be fun ha). Will the graduate level course fulfill the pre-req at most schools?

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Sorry, but you're asking if a harder graduate level course replaces an undergraduate course? Please think before you ask these kind of questions.

You know the answer to your own question.
 
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Yes, it will fulfill it.
 
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If you haven't taken the MCAT yet, I'd be wary of how well the grad level class prepares you for that though. Since most grad courses are taught in seminar-style, they presuppose some prior knowledge of the subject and so may not cover the subject in the breadth required. In my experience, grad courses are phenomenal in exposing you to a particular subfield, but don't do as good of a job in teaching you the fundamentals.
 

Perhaps, but we do have a lot of posts on here that are repetitive and self-explanatory. There's no insult here, just reminding the OP that things can be searched or figured out without asking on this forum.

There's an instruction book on AMCAS or even the websites of medical schools that the OP can read.
 
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If you haven't taken the MCAT yet, I'd be wary of how well the grad level class prepares you for that though. Since most grad courses are taught in seminar-style, they presuppose some prior knowledge of the subject and so may not cover the subject in the breadth required. In my experience, grad courses are phenomenal in exposing you to a particular subfield, but don't do as good of a job in teaching you the fundamentals.
Honestly, no classes are good MCAT prep. Undergrad or grad. The best by far is always independent work out of MCAT-specific prep books.
 
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Honestly, no classes are good MCAT prep. Undergrad or grad. The best by far is always independent work out of MCAT-specific prep books.

Fair enough. But grad level courses pre-suppose some understanding of the topic beforehand. Of the ones I'm familiar with, all were seminar format where you read recent papers and discuss them in class with student-led presentations. Not the best way to learn biochem if you don't know it already.
 
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And yet, the guy who worked hard to contribute to SDN got the axe. :smack:

Yes, it will fulfill it.
That is not accurate. It depends in the school. Many specifically list undergraduate credits as needed to fulfill prereqs. You would likely need to request a waiver upon acceptance

gonnif is correct. In a macroscopic perspective, graduate GPA is viewed separate from undergrad GPA, so a graduate level class (like 500 and above) will not necessarily substitute for undergraduate level prerequisite. The best is to take a 300 or 400-level substitute if possible.
 
That is not accurate. It depends in the school. Many specifically list undergraduate credits as needed to fulfill prereqs. You would likely need to request a waiver upon acceptance
I never noticed any specifying the undergraduate version when I applied last cycle, but sure, best to check with each school
 
That is not accurate. It depends in the school. Many specifically list undergraduate credits as needed to fulfill prereqs. You would likely need to request a waiver upon acceptance

I believe this is becoming less true with each admissions cycle as schools are transitioning toward competency-based admissions instead of the traditional course requirements. The new MCAT is designed to reflect this.
 
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