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Dominican University Post-Bacc program- Still around?

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JooceMan137

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Hey guys,

I was looking for Post-bacc programs for pre-med pre-reqs in the Chicagoland area, and was curious if the Dominican University Post-Bacc program is still around? I've been searching around and it seems that there hasn't been any new info for the past couple of years.

If anyone could chime in it would be appreciated.
 

ancel_poster

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Yes, it’s still around. I’m attending in the fall.

Hey guys,

I was looking for Post-bacc programs for pre-med pre-reqs in the Chicagoland area, and was curious if the Dominican University Post-Bacc program is still around? I've been searching around and it seems that there hasn't been any new info for the past couple of years.

If anyone could chime in it would be appreciated.
, it’s
 

graduateguy

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Hey, yeah it is still around. I graduated from that program in spring of 16. Good program, learned a lot. Professors actually care and really help out. Dr. Hughes really helps with your personal statement and CV. Their main affiliate is St. Kitts. Let me know if you have any specific questions about the program.
 

ancel_poster

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Hey, yeah it is still around. I graduated from that program in spring of 16. Good program, learned a lot. Professors actually care and really help out. Dr. Hughes really helps with your personal statement and CV. Their main affiliate is St. Kitts. Let me know if you have any specific questions about the program.

Did you take your MCAT while in the program??
 

Abc122

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Hey, yeah it is still around. I graduated from that program in spring of 16. Good program, learned a lot. Professors actually care and really help out. Dr. Hughes really helps with your personal statement and CV. Their main affiliate is St. Kitts. Let me know if you have any specific questions about the program.


Was completing the program part time an option?
 

TyMD

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Hey, yeah it is still around. I graduated from that program in spring of 16. Good program, learned a lot. Professors actually care and really help out. Dr. Hughes really helps with your personal statement and CV. Their main affiliate is St. Kitts. Let me know if you have any specific questions about the program.
Did most students make it into an MD school in the U.S.? What are the pros and cons?
 

Mr. Nice Guy 00

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DO NOT ATTEND DOMINICAN UNIVERSITY POST BACC

I attended the first week of classes at Dominican University BMS program (I chose the career enhancer track) and decided to withdraw after the first week. There's another post on SDN by "2inspireU" from 2011 who talks about their experience at Dominican's BMS program and I was able to relate to a lot of his comments regarding the professors/advisors (Hughes, Scannichio, and Wilson). Even though it was posted 8 years ago it is still very accurate from what I was able to observe. The program will accept anyone with a bachelors degree without looking at their transcripts which is very unethical considering the program cost ~$32,000 and most students will not benefit at all. Everything that this post bacc offers can be done on your own for A LOT less money. They will sell you with the cadaver lab, preceptorships, and committee letter. The cadaver lab is a pretty cool, unique thing about the program, but will not help you get into med school. The preceptorship aka shadowing can be done by reaching out to health professionals in your area via email. And the committee letter or letter of recommendations can be obtained from science professors at your local university by either taking the pre-req courses (career changer) or upper-level science courses (career enhancer). The best thing about post bacc programs is the student advising and the advisors in this program (Hughes & Scannichio) are absolute trash. They are there for the money and that is it. Just make an appointment with a pre-health advisor at a local university and they will map out a plan for you that's honest and realistic.

A little background on me:
- undergrad cGPA: 2.7
- MCAT: Plan to re-take Jan. 2019
- I have about a year of clinical experience as a medical support specialist and over 100 hrs of shadowing and volunteering.

My plan:
- Score above 500 on the MCAT
- Take a few under grad upper-level science courses at my local university
- Apply to a masters program or a specialized masters program (SMP) either way I need to prove that I can handle graduate level science courses.

Anyone that is in a similar situation should score as high as possible on the MCAT and then use that score to get into a masters program or SMP. My GPA is beyond repair but taking upper-level undergrad science courses will help for the MCAT and also show schools that you are being productive during these gap years. Also, the second bachelors degree in biomedical science (BMS) that Dominican offers will not replace your first bachelors. Medical schools will look at your entire transcript. All the courses in the BMS program are undergrad courses, therefore, will do nothing but nudge your undergrad GPA if you were to get all A's so you might as well pay a lot less and just take the same classes at a local university.

******Anyone considering a post bacc should read the advice below that Goro posted on the SDN:******

"So you want to be a doctor, but your GPA is terrible. Is that the end? Rule #1: Take a deep breath, and stop fussing. The sky is not falling.

But you are going to need to reinvent yourself. This will take both time and money. And always remember that you’re in a marathon now, not a sprint. The following advice holds true for people considering MD and DO. I strongly recommend that you keep both in mind, and the latter is more tolerant of reinvention.

EDIT: An even better summary to the next paragraph is provided by the wise HomeSkool here: Simple rules for retaking courses

Here’s what you need to do :

a) IF you have F/D grades in the pre-reqs, retake them. You need to show that you can master this material, and it will help you for MCAT (assuming that you haven’t taken the MCAT). In addition, many schools require a C or higher grade in pre-reqs. Naturally, this will vary from school to school.

If you got C's, take some upper level science classes and ace them. There is no need to retake a C unless you are very weak on the material and you need it for MCAT. Never, ever retake a B or B-.

If the material was from a long time ago, and you got a B, but you feel you need a refresher for the MCAT, simply audit the course instead.

b) There are MD schools that reward reinvention. All DO schools do. The DO path will be a little easier, but both still require an investment of 1-2 years of not GPA repair, but of transcript repair.

c) The goal is NOT to raise your cGPA to a sky high level (for some people this is mathematically impossible), but rather show that the you of now is not the you of then, and that you can handle a medical school curriculum. So do not worry that your cGPA will be 3.2 upon applying after finishing your post-bac/GPA. Rising GPA trends are always looked highly upon, and many med schools weight the last 2-3 years more than the entire cGPA.

d) Thus, take 1-2 years of a DIY post-bac, or a 1 year SMP, preferably one given at a medical school. Do well in either of these programs. A 3.5+ should suffice for a DO school, while 3.7+ will be needed for an MD school

e) in addition to d), your MCAT score will determine where to aim. I suggest:

513+ : MD schools

510+ : your state MD school and any DO school

505+: any DO school

500+: the newest DO schools

On top of these, get as much patient contact volunteering time in as possible. A trend I am seeing from SDNers who have received interviews from good schools and who also reinvented themselves, is that they have lots of clinical volunteering or employment...some even in the 1000s of hours.

As to the pluses and minuses of post-bac vs SMP:

A formal post-bac program is geared toward career switchers, and mostly provide the pre-reqs, and probably some MCAT advice/prep as well. You get faculty guidance in this and some programs seem to be feeders to med schools for non-trad students. They will cost more though.

Now, you can do the same thing on your own by simply taking continuing education courses at any nearby college. A four year school will be preferable to a community college (CC), but if costs are an issue, then a CC will be OK. This path is what is known here in SDN as the “DIY post-bac.” Costs will be less, but there’s no guidance.

What classes should one take in a DIY post-bac??? Things that mimic a medical school curriculum!

Anatomy
Physiology
Histology
Biostats
Cell Bio
Molecular Bio or Genetics
Biochem
Med Micro OR Bacteriology and/or Virology
Neuroscience
Immunology
Parasitology (if offered)
Pathology

An SMP (special master’s program) is one that offers medical school classes, or material that’s taught in medical school. These can be a backdoor into med school, and you get real advice from med school faculty (if given at a med school). Plus, you're a known quantity to the Adcom members, who will frequently be your SMP faculty. The down side is that the tuition will be more considerable. You may also have to relocate in order to attend one.

There are some two year SMPs, but I don’t see any advantage to these over one year programs.

Also, if you do poorly, your SMP degree is worthless, unless the program has an added-value component, like some research venue. Thus, SMPs are more high risk, but also high reward.

One final word of warning: Do NOT take the MCAT while enrolled in an SMP. We’ve seen students do this, and it leads to disaster. Some programs require an MCAT, so that solves the problem (although they may have a minimum score requirement!).

And remember, med schools aren’t going anywhere, and in fact, by the time you apply, several more will have opened their doors.

Good luck!"
 
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GenSurgONLY

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DO NOT ATTEND DOMINICAN UNIVERSITY POST BACC

I attended the first week of classes at Dominican University BMS program (I chose the career enhancer track) and decided to withdraw after the first week. There's another post on SDN by "2inspireU" from 2011 who talks about their experience at Dominican's BMS program and I was able to relate to a lot of his comments regarding the professors/advisors (Hughes, Scannichio, and Wilson). Even though it was posted 8 years ago it is still very accurate from what I was able to observe. The program will accept anyone with a bachelors degree without looking at their transcripts which is very unethical considering the program cost ~$32,000 and most students will not benefit at all. Everything that this post bacc offers can be done on your own for A LOT less money. They will sell you with the cadaver lab, preceptorships, and committee letter. The cadaver lab is a pretty cool, unique thing about the program, but will not help you get into med school. The preceptorship aka shadowing can be done by reaching out to health professionals in your area via email. And the committee letter or letter of recommendations can be obtained from science professors at your local university by either taking the pre-req courses (career changer) or upper-level science courses (career enhancer). The best thing about post bacc programs is the student advising and the advisors in this program (Hughes & Scannichio) are absolute trash. They are there for the money and that is it. Just make an appointment with a pre-health advisor at a local university and they will map out a plan for you that's honest and realistic.

A little background on me:
- undergrad cGPA: 2.7
- MCAT: Plan to re-take Jan. 2019
- I have about a year of clinical experience as a medical support specialist and over 100 hrs of shadowing and volunteering.

My plan:
- Score above 500 on the MCAT
- Take a few under grad upper-level science courses at my local university
- Apply to a masters program or a specialized masters program (SMP) either way I need to prove that I can handle graduate level science courses.

Anyone that is in a similar situation should score as high as possible on the MCAT and then use that score to get into a masters program or SMP. My GPA is beyond repair but taking upper-level undergrad science courses will help for the MCAT and also show schools that you are being productive during these gap years. Also, the second bachelors degree in biomedical science (BMS) that Dominican offers will not replace your first bachelors. Medical schools will look at your entire transcript. All the courses in the BMS program are undergrad courses, therefore, will do nothing but nudge your undergrad GPA if you were to get all A's so you might as well pay a lot less and just take the same classes at a local university.

******Anyone considering a post bacc should read the advice below that Goro posted on the SDN:******

"So you want to be a doctor, but your GPA is terrible. Is that the end? Rule #1: Take a deep breath, and stop fussing. The sky is not falling.

But you are going to need to reinvent yourself. This will take both time and money. And always remember that you’re in a marathon now, not a sprint. The following advice holds true for people considering MD and DO. I strongly recommend that you keep both in mind, and the latter is more tolerant of reinvention.

EDIT: An even better summary to the next paragraph is provided by the wise HomeSkool here: Simple rules for retaking courses

Here’s what you need to do :

a) IF you have F/D grades in the pre-reqs, retake them. You need to show that you can master this material, and it will help you for MCAT (assuming that you haven’t taken the MCAT). In addition, many schools require a C or higher grade in pre-reqs. Naturally, this will vary from school to school.

If you got C's, take some upper level science classes and ace them. There is no need to retake a C unless you are very weak on the material and you need it for MCAT. Never, ever retake a B or B-.

If the material was from a long time ago, and you got a B, but you feel you need a refresher for the MCAT, simply audit the course instead.

b) There are MD schools that reward reinvention. All DO schools do. The DO path will be a little easier, but both still require an investment of 1-2 years of not GPA repair, but of transcript repair.

c) The goal is NOT to raise your cGPA to a sky high level (for some people this is mathematically impossible), but rather show that the you of now is not the you of then, and that you can handle a medical school curriculum. So do not worry that your cGPA will be 3.2 upon applying after finishing your post-bac/GPA. Rising GPA trends are always looked highly upon, and many med schools weight the last 2-3 years more than the entire cGPA.

d) Thus, take 1-2 years of a DIY post-bac, or a 1 year SMP, preferably one given at a medical school. Do well in either of these programs. A 3.5+ should suffice for a DO school, while 3.7+ will be needed for an MD school

e) in addition to d), your MCAT score will determine where to aim. I suggest:

513+ : MD schools

510+ : your state MD school and any DO school

505+: any DO school

500+: the newest DO schools

On top of these, get as much patient contact volunteering time in as possible. A trend I am seeing from SDNers who have received interviews from good schools and who also reinvented themselves, is that they have lots of clinical volunteering or employment...some even in the 1000s of hours.

As to the pluses and minuses of post-bac vs SMP:

A formal post-bac program is geared toward career switchers, and mostly provide the pre-reqs, and probably some MCAT advice/prep as well. You get faculty guidance in this and some programs seem to be feeders to med schools for non-trad students. They will cost more though.

Now, you can do the same thing on your own by simply taking continuing education courses at any nearby college. A four year school will be preferable to a community college (CC), but if costs are an issue, then a CC will be OK. This path is what is known here in SDN as the “DIY post-bac.” Costs will be less, but there’s no guidance.

What classes should one take in a DIY post-bac??? Things that mimic a medical school curriculum!

Anatomy
Physiology
Histology
Biostats
Cell Bio
Molecular Bio or Genetics
Biochem
Med Micro OR Bacteriology and/or Virology
Neuroscience
Immunology
Parasitology (if offered)
Pathology

An SMP (special master’s program) is one that offers medical school classes, or material that’s taught in medical school. These can be a backdoor into med school, and you get real advice from med school faculty (if given at a med school). Plus, you're a known quantity to the Adcom members, who will frequently be your SMP faculty. The down side is that the tuition will be more considerable. You may also have to relocate in order to attend one.

There are some two year SMPs, but I don’t see any advantage to these over one year programs.

Also, if you do poorly, your SMP degree is worthless, unless the program has an added-value component, like some research venue. Thus, SMPs are more high risk, but also high reward.

One final word of warning: Do NOT take the MCAT while enrolled in an SMP. We’ve seen students do this, and it leads to disaster. Some programs require an MCAT, so that solves the problem (although they may have a minimum score requirement!).

And remember, med schools aren’t going anywhere, and in fact, by the time you apply, several more will have opened their doors.

Good luck!"

Why do people keep saying 1-2 years for a post bacc? Is that for people who just go to school? I am wondering because when I factor all the credits, it’s easily 3 years, even with cramming. Are some classes not needed? In my post bacc a study plan is listed but must you take ALL the extras beyond 1-2 upper divisions? Beyond the minimum, how many higher ups are mandated via your program(generally speaking since it varies depending on one’s program)?

Thank you!
 

elizr

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Yes, it’s still around. I’m attending in the fall.


, it’s
How do you like it? I just got accepted (realized I wanted to go into podiatry during my last year of music schooling) and am planning on starting this fall!
 

sktu20

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I just got accepted! I can't seem to find much info on this program and am wondering if its worth the money or not. I'm a pre-dental student who has around a 2.9 gpa and needs to raise it. Has anyone had any luck in this program?
 

dlee2593

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I was recently accepted into a neurology residency and will be graduating from a DO school this May. I attended this program from 2015-2016 after undergrad and before starting med school in 2017. I would recommend this program for certain applicants and I personally think the leadership is great, especially Dr. Hughes. If anyone has any questions in regards to the program feel free to message me
 

krocki

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I was recently accepted into a neurology residency and will be graduating from a DO school this May. I attended this program from 2015-2016 after undergrad and before starting med school in 2017. I would recommend this program for certain applicants and I personally think the leadership is great, especially Dr. Hughes. If anyone has any questions in regards to the program feel free to message me
Hi! I was just accepted for Fall 2021. What do you mean 'certain applicants'? What were your most/least favorite parts of the program? Can you tell me a little about your application to medical school timeline (when you took the MCAT, submitted primary/secondary applications)?? I'm a 2016 grad that has 5 years of clinical experience as a paramedic; I had all prereqs but OChem II and Physics II completed for medical school, and to take those classes I'm going to have to take Ochem I/ Physics I again since its been so long I don't remember everything. The biggest things I need in a program are volunteering opportunities and academic support (professors that are helpful/LORs/advising/committee letters); can you talk about how your experiences were with these things specifically? I was reading that some people think this program is terrible & while one person's opinion now I feel uneasy so any assurance would be super helpful!! Thanks!!
 

dlee2593

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Hi! I was just accepted for Fall 2021. What do you mean 'certain applicants'? What were your most/least favorite parts of the program? Can you tell me a little about your application to medical school timeline (when you took the MCAT, submitted primary/secondary applications)?? I'm a 2016 grad that has 5 years of clinical experience as a paramedic; I had all prereqs but OChem II and Physics II completed for medical school, and to take those classes I'm going to have to take Ochem I/ Physics I again since its been so long I don't remember everything. The biggest things I need in a program are volunteering opportunities and academic support (professors that are helpful/LORs/advising/committee letters); can you talk about how your experiences were with these things specifically? I was reading that some people think this program is terrible & while one person's opinion now I feel uneasy so any assurance would be super helpful!! Thanks!!
I was in a similar situation as you. I just needed two classes each of bio, ochem, and physics. I started the program in the fall of 2015, took the MCAT in the spring of 2016 and was accepted to medical school by fall of 2016. The classes aren't too challenging as long as you put the time and effort into them. It's not a program where you can take it easy. I actually think the two areas you talked about were pretty strong in regards to the program. When I was there they had a class for shadowing preceptors at the local hospital and there are many hospitals in the area to volunteer at which I did when I was at Dominican. I also needed letters when I entered the program and found a couple professors plus a committee letter to add to my application. I loved Dr. Hughes when I was there and I thought she provided me a lot of guidance along my path. They won't hold your hand in this program though and you do need to do your own research to fill in the gaps in regards to applying to medical school. Coming from my own personal experience I thought the program was very help and I don't think I would have got into medical school without it.
 
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sgar94

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would taking medical school related classes online be ok?
 
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