UCLAbruin08

10+ Year Member
Sep 26, 2008
85
2
California
Status
Non-Student
i know that this has probably been mentioned in another thread a while back, but thought that I should bring it back up since acceptances are slowly being mailed out. In terms of deciding a school does the degree really matter (DPT vs MPT)?

To me it's similar to having a BSN vs an Associates degree in nursing since both have to take the same NCLEX in the end in order to practice and what you have doesn't really quite matter. Is there a salary difference between those with an MPT and DPT? (I'd ask those I work for, however, it'd be quite an odd conversation) However, considering the changing situation of to which physical therapy is progressing (direct access etc) is it better to get the DPT? I'm only asking because the public schools in Southern California CSUN and CSULB only offer MPT degrees and are considerably cheapter than the more numerous private schools in the surrounding area.
 
May 7, 2010
4
0
Status
My vote goes to MPT for the following reasons:

1. Employers are not really concerned whether u have an MPT or DPT. Rather some of them are very happy even with a BS - PT. They primarily need:
A. An experienced PT
B. with a valid state license
C. passed out from an APTA accredited course

2. Hence there is hardly any salary difference betn DPT and MPT

3. If you look carefully there is not a very significant difference in their syllabus either.

4. And also hardly any difference in the duties we will be assigned to as a PT after we graduate

5. Less debt in MPT

6. So why not pass out a year earlier, use that year to work and get better experience and use that money to do additional courses like BLS, CPR etc ??

Well..... there are many who will disagree with me of course... but this is my opinion
 
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seminolefish

10+ Year Member
May 1, 2008
138
0
Gainesville
Status
Rehab Sci Student
The salaries of PTs are not as bad as you think. Some PTs really get the shaft while others can do extremely well. You should know that it depends on so many factors. You can make a lot it just takes some wit. I could go further but I hope you know what I'm talking about. If you go to WCU w/o a GA you will still have to pay around 40K for the two years (out of state). I agree that is much less than 57K which I will be paying and props to you! I wish I would've applied there honestly. However, that's nowhere near 100K for me in the long run. The living expenses are comparable in those regions. I would definitely say you're one of the last lucky few to get a GA and go to WCU for a MPT...that is awesome.

One other thing, good luck finding a MPT program to apply for. WCU and one other (I think) offer the MPT but WCU has closed that door as of this year.
 

lee9786

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Feb 3, 2009
616
9
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
I recommend going for the MPT if you can. Spend that extra time getting experience and certifications. Pursue a tDPT down the road while you're working as a PT and attempt to get your employer to help pay for it.
 
May 7, 2010
4
0
Status
Besides western carolina university there is
-CSU Long Beach
-CSU Northridge
-CSU Sacramento
-CSU Fresno
-Winston-Salem State
-The University of British Columbia

Here is a FAQ from CSU to put this whole debate into perspective. Yes there are few remaining MPT programs and I am blessed to get my PT license in only two years. If you have the opportunity to attend one of these programs do it!!

Is there a difference between having an MPT and DPT degree when it comes to licensure or PT practice?

There is absolutely no difference between having an MPT and DPT degree when it comes to applying for licensure or in clinical practice. The California State Board of Physical Therapy issues licenses to practice PT to applicants who have graduated from a CAPTE accredited educational program and who have passed the Licensure Examination. There is no consideration whether the applicant’s degree is an MPT or DPT. Employers are concerned that an applicant holds a current PT license and with the clinical experience of an applicant. Seldom do employers consider degree status (MPT vs. DPT).

Will a DPT allow me to be able to teach in a PT program?

Over 95% of advertised faculty positions in the past year have listed an academic doctorate (PhD. or EdD or DSc.) as necessary to apply for faculty teaching positions. The DPT is not considered the “terminal” degree in the discipline of physical therapy, and the DPT alone usually does not allow instructors to become traditional tenure-track or tenured professors.

Why does Sac State not offer the entry-level DPT?

The state of California requires legislative approval for the California State University campuses to award the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree. We simply cannot award this degree under current law. This does not, however, affect licensure eligibility, or practice potential of our graduates. Since we are fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), our program meets the same rigorous standards and outcomes that all accredited DPT programs meet. Because we meet the same accreditation requirements of all physical therapy programs across the country, our graduates are eligible for licensure in any state.[


That was illuminating. Thanks for posting it....... :)
 

trace26

10+ Year Member
Feb 28, 2009
16
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
I can't speak for the other schools but I'm currently finishing up my undergrad at CSULB. Their masters program is actually more like 3 years. Your first year you are "conditionally accepted" taking courses like gross anatomy, etc. If you pass all your classes in your first year, you begin the "2 year program". I don't know if all CSUs are like that, but I have a friend at CSULB's masters program and this is what I've been told.

Getting your masters is immensely cheaper, and it seems popular on this site to recommend going to the cheapest program possible. Just as an FYI, one of my professors announced last week that CSULB is CLOSE to getting the legislative approval to offer a doctorate degree possibly within the next couple years? If that's the case, talk about a bargain DPT degree! Of course, nothing is set in stone currently.

Good luck at whichever program you choose! :)
 
May 15, 2009
96
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
The state of California requires legislative approval for the California State University campuses to award the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree. We simply cannot award this degree under current law. This does not, however, affect licensure eligibility, or practice potential of our graduates. Since we are fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), our program meets the same rigorous standards and outcomes that all accredited DPT programs meet. Because we meet the same accreditation requirements of all physical therapy programs across the country, our graduates are eligible for licensure in any state.
A bill that allows CSUs to offer the entry level DPT has just passed out of the State Assembly and will proceed to the Senate Education Committee. It has already passed through 3 previous sub committees and its passage looks promising.
 
May 9, 2010
4
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
A bill that allows CSUs to offer the entry level DPT has just passed out of the State Assembly and will proceed to the Senate Education Committee. It has already passed through 3 previous sub committees and its passage looks promising.
I was just wondering what this would mean for me? I am going to be applying to Cal States for the fall of 2011 and just wondering if this would mean I would get the DPT or MPT if were to go through the program for the 2/3 years.
 
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