soccer31

10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2008
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Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
This article on the Washington Post came out and emphasizes the role that evidence based practice might have on future health systems:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/07/25/AR2009072502380_2.html?sid=ST2009072502457

I just started PT school, so I am still not a whole lot familiar with how the system works right now. I would like to know from those who have been on the field, or know how it works, how this might affect the future of our profession. Wouldn't this push for EBP benefit us???
 

truthseeker

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Sep 2, 2004
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This article on the Washington Post came out and emphasizes the role that evidence based practice might have on future health systems:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/07/25/AR2009072502380_2.html?sid=ST2009072502457

I just started PT school, so I am still not a whole lot familiar with how the system works right now. I would like to know from those who have been on the field, or know how it works, how this might affect the future of our profession. Wouldn't this push for EBP benefit us???

It certainly will benefit those who practice EBP provided the big payors allow us to practice it and don't dictate what we can and can't do. Currently those therapists (and doctors, and podiatrists, and chiropractors) don't really get reimbursed better whether they practice based upon evidence or not. They get paid by the number of visits the insuror will allow, then they are cut off.

I can count on one hand the number of times that an insurance company has cut me off before I was done. Too many providers treat symptoms and not the causes of musculoskeletal problems. That is why US and massage are still on the list of things paid for by insurance companies.