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EKG's

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hermione

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I was wondering how much you guys think you should know, or how much you personally knew, before you start third year. I'm not sure if I should be studying and memorizing Dubin now, or if I should just plan on learning as I go once rotations start. Any opinions? It seems like there is so much to know, I guess I'm looking for your ideas on what is really expected of a 3rd year student.
 

neilc

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dubin's is great, but to keep up your skills, you need to be reading ekg's regularly. i would say learn what you need to know for classes as you go. when you get to rotation time, go through dubin's again. that way, it will be fresh in your mind, and you will be practicing on a regular basis after that. in the pre-clinical years, there was little use for EKG outside of the section in physio. it was not high yeild for the usmle, outside of the basic principles.
 

hermione

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Thanks. I think I'll start reading dubin now, and reread it again later on. I appreciate your reply.
 

hermione

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Awesome link, thanks so much!
 

GO_MEDPEDS

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Personally, I really didn't know that much going into third year, and yet you will pick up what you need as you go. As stated earlier, the trick is to keep looking at EKGs and keep using a standard method to analyze them (Rate, Rhythm, Axis, etc.). There are too many nuances to learn on your own, but reading Dubin and having a good basic understanding will help (I really wouldn't try to memorize it, though).

Here's another site:

http://www.monroecc.edu/depts/pstc/prandekg.htm

Try and get good at the following:
Find the P wave
Is there a P before each QRS
What is the rate
Is the QRS normal or prolonged
Is the P-R interval normal or prolonged
Are your inflections in I and aVF positive (normal axis)
Are there any ST elevations
Is there good R wave progression
Are there any other abnormalities (peaked T waves, U waves, unusual P waves in Lead II, artifact from a pacemaker, etc.)

NEVER TRUST THE COMPUTER ANALYSIS!!!

Hope this helps!

:D
 

aecuenca2

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I thought Dubin's was okay, but a much better resource was 150 Practice ECG's by Taylor. I thought this book was awesome, especially during my cardio rotation.

Hope that helps!
 

DrQuinn

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The best book, HANDS DOWN, on EKG interp is The Art of 12-Lead EKG Interpretation by Garcia. He's an Emergency Medicine Physician... and who reads EKGs second only to cardiologists? US! Its format is unique and I cannot recommend it highly enough!

However, as a third year, I think Dubin's is fine. Know your basic stuff like GO_MEDPEDS said, that should last you. Also know some oddball stuff like reciprocal changes, posterior wall infarcts, and S1Q3T3.

Q, DO
 
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