Sep 12, 2017
6
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So, I've seen a few SDN threads about this but none that apply directly to my situation. Posted this in the MD forum, seems more applicable here.

I got a DUI almost a decade ago, stupidest thing that I've ever done, I'm not downplaying it. I took full accountability and have been squeaky clean since. My DUI occurred in a state that does not consider a DUI a misdemeanor or a felony. It's a traffic ticket. Thus, I am obviously answering "no" to have I committed a felony or misdemeanor.

However, I'm asking about the nebulous "Is there anything in your past history that would limit your ability to be licensed or would limit your ability to receive hospital privileges?". I... don't think so? I truly don't believe a decade-old DUI will hinder my ability to get a license, and I don't want to volunteer information that won't affect my licensing. I also, however, don't want to be deceitful in the least. I screwed up, I took ownership, I have been smarter since.

I am really torn about this, and don't know what to do. I haven't hid my DUI, my school knows about it (asked in secondaries), and still admitted me. On one hand, I know substance abuse issues are rightfully an area of huge concern in medicine, and on the other, this DUI was so far in the past that I can't imagine it will be an issue with me getting a medical license. I know people will still be able to find it, again, not worried about hiding it. I just don't want to lie on ERAS, but also don't want to be unnecessarily forthcoming. I was thinking about contacting a few state licensing boards today in areas I'm applying for residency to ask if this could affect my ability to get a medical license? Is this question truly asking for things that will affect my licensing, or is it getting at a bigger, "red flags" issue?

Thanks in advance for your input.
 
OP
T
Sep 12, 2017
6
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Update: Still likely erring on the side of disclosure, but was told by my home program they think "no" is an acceptable answer to the question given the length of time between the incident and my ERAS application. Truly unsure how to proceed.
 
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AdmiralChz

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This has been asked a hundred times in many different places, search for it. Or do what your home program says to do. I don't know how to answer your question, unfortunately.

Enforcement has ramped up in the last decade in almost every state, in just about all a DUI is at least a misdemeanor and in some it's a straight up felony depending on the circumstance.
 
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aProgDirector

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If you disclose it, it probably will make no difference and then you don't have to worry about it any more.

The real problem is your licensing app. It's quite possible that whatever state you go to will require you to disclose it. Then, when you do and the PD sees it but it wasn't on your app, you could be in trouble. Trust me, the amount of worry this situation will cause isn't worth it. I'd just disclose it. Most people won't care. Anyone who does care is CERTAIN to care when you leave it off your app, and then disclose it on your licensing app.
 
OP
T
Sep 12, 2017
6
0
This has been asked a hundred times in many different places, search for it. Or do what your home program says to do. I don't know how to answer your question, unfortunately.

Enforcement has ramped up in the last decade in almost every state, in just about all a DUI is at least a misdemeanor and in some it's a straight up felony depending on the circumstance.
Hey, thanks for the input. I know there are similar threads, just had a little bit of a different circumstance so I figured I'd see if that change anything. And yes, penalties have gotten stricter in my state, but a decade ago when I screwed up, I was given a traffic violation and not given a misdemeanor.
 
OP
T
Sep 12, 2017
6
0
If you disclose it, it probably will make no difference and then you don't have to worry about it any more.

The real problem is your licensing app. It's quite possible that whatever state you go to will require you to disclose it. Then, when you do and the PD sees it but it wasn't on your app, you could be in trouble. Trust me, the amount of worry this situation will cause isn't worth it. I'd just disclose it. Most people won't care. Anyone who does care is CERTAIN to care when you leave it off your app, and then disclose it on your licensing app.
Thanks a lot for weighing in! I guess I was worried I'd be hamstringing myself possibly unnecessarily if I disclosed? I am fully aware that it will show up with my licensing application, and I will have to do extra paperwork for it. The state licensing boards I spoke to said that a decade-old OWI would not be a problem for getting a license. The intent isn't to hide it, because obviously it will come to light when I apply for my license, but it realistically won't affect my licensing. Just didn't want to get my app thrown in the NO pile right away.

Your point about people who do care caring more is a good one, I never thought of it that way. My only hesitation is that the PD at my institution and one of the physicians in the administration both said they wouldn't think twice if I said no, it came up during licensing, and I was able to explain it happened so long ago. I also spoke to a lawyer who said this is clearly something to disclose for licensing, but he recommends not disclosing on a job application with the way the question is asked.

This is all a huge hassle (self-imposed, of course), probably best to just disclose.
 
OP
T
Sep 12, 2017
6
0
If you disclose it, it probably will make no difference and then you don't have to worry about it any more.

The real problem is your licensing app. It's quite possible that whatever state you go to will require you to disclose it. Then, when you do and the PD sees it but it wasn't on your app, you could be in trouble. Trust me, the amount of worry this situation will cause isn't worth it. I'd just disclose it. Most people won't care. Anyone who does care is CERTAIN to care when you leave it off your app, and then disclose it on your licensing app.
Oh, and just one last question if you have the time: how much should I disclose? The DUI was an odd one, as I was not driving when I was ticketed. I quickly realized I was not okay to drive, pulled over, and I was parked, behind the wheel of my running car, awaiting a ride when a police officer saw me in a parking lot after hours. I don't want to make excuses, again I made a very dumb mistake that could have been much worse by getting in any vehicle inebriated, but is it worth explaining the circumstances of my DUI?
 

aProgDirector

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My only hesitation is that the PD at my institution and one of the physicians in the administration both said they wouldn't think twice if I said no, it came up during licensing, and I was able to explain it happened so long ago. I also spoke to a lawyer who said this is clearly something to disclose for licensing, but he recommends not disclosing on a job application with the way the question is asked.
So, sounds like your PD also won't care if it's disclosed, so it's a wash either way. And I'm sure I could find another PD who will care. I still think the best course of action is to disclose it. Sure, you might blame any rejection on it -- but honestly, any rejection is probably due to something else. And, if you are rejected because of it, it might become a big deal during the hiring process. Theoretically, they could waive your match and claim you were fraudulent on your application -- that could get you tossed from ERAS and the NRMP. Unlikely, but simply not worth it.

Put another way, if you have to disclose it for licensing, then you should disclose it on your app. As it might affect your licensing. If it was guaranteed not to affect your licensing, then you wouldn't need to disclose it on your licensing app.

Oh, and just one last question if you have the time: how much should I disclose? The DUI was an odd one, as I was not driving when I was ticketed. I quickly realized I was not okay to drive, pulled over, and I was parked, behind the wheel of my running car, awaiting a ride when a police officer saw me in a parking lot after hours. I don't want to make excuses, again I made a very dumb mistake that could have been much worse by getting in any vehicle inebriated, but is it worth explaining the circumstances of my DUI?
Short and sweet. It's long enough ago that no one will care much. The sentence above is fine.
 
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