1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Hey Texans—join us for a DFW meetup! Click here to learn more.
    Dismiss Notice

Errors in FA (or other review books)

Discussion in 'Step I' started by AlexRusso, Apr 25, 2004.

  1. AlexRusso

    AlexRusso Senior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Just thought this might cut down on the amt. of time spent looking through other books to figure out if it is indeed an "error" -- also keeps you from going insane trying to figure out why the books disagrees whith what you think you knew pretty well.

    I'll start it off:
    FA 2004 Path section on Blood Dyscrasias (pp 239) Lists "Crew cut" on skull x-ray as a feature of sickle cell anemia when it is actually seen in association with B-thal major. :confused: Thought I was goin crazy, checked Robbins, Robbins agrees its B-thal not SCA.

    Post more if you got 'em
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Solace

    Solace Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    I wouldn't count out the "crew cut" for SC so quickly. I had thought the same thing when I was doing review questions through either Qbank or Appleton and Lange review book (can't recall which one it was) and l picked Thalassemia and the answer was Sickle Cell. :confused:

    Bottom line: I would concentrate more on the other info in the question stem. "Knee jerk" responses is my biggest downfall in preparing for this test.
     
  4. Willamette

    Willamette Good with a bo-staff
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Messages:
    567
    Likes Received:
    0
    Are all secondary to expansion of the marrow cavity, which is itself due to enhanced RBC hyperplasia. Thus, ANY SEVERE ANEMIA can cause these signs. Good luck w/ your studies :luck: :luck: !!!

    Willamette
     
  5. mountaindew2006

    mountaindew2006 Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2003
    Messages:
    329
    Likes Received:
    0
    i'm confused...

    so the answer is SCA ??????
     
  6. nuclearrabbit77

    nuclearrabbit77 commercial sex worker
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    2
    FA 2004. pg 276. says that cystine stones are radiolucent. (pg. 1615 harrisons says it's radioopaque "due to the sulfur content")


    FA pg 314. diagram on CV therapy. arrow for sympathetic discharge is flipped and should be pointed up.
     
  7. nuclearrabbit77

    nuclearrabbit77 commercial sex worker
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    2
    BRS path. pg 277.
    they define trousseau's sign as migratory thrombophlebitis.
    this is not correct, trousseau's sign is carpopedal spasm after inflation of blood pressure cuff for hypocalcemic tetany. trousseau's syndrome is migratory thrombophlebitis seen in visceral cancers, often in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.
     
  8. AlexRusso

    AlexRusso Senior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Yea I was just looking at that myself. You're 100% right.
     
  9. tega

    tega Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2002
    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    1
    hehe, i thought my mind was playing tricks on me every time i read pp 277...cuz , i could remember reading something different about T. sign somewhere else. Never took time to confirm.
    Thanks for the clarification.
     
  10. Idiopathic

    Idiopathic Newly Minted
    Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2003
    Messages:
    8,363
    Likes Received:
    16
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Trousseau's syndrome or the Trousseau sign both relate to visceral malignancy, while Trousseau's sign as pertaining to tetany deals with low serum Ca++. As long as you know what the clinical presentation is, the wording shouldnt matter (i.e., you are not going to have to choose between a sign and a syndrome).

    The biggest problem, I think, is going through any review book and not referencing topics that you think are incorrect, whether in Robbins or Guyton or Moore or whatever. There are errors, especially in student-driven publications, and catching them will actually show how much you do know.
     
  11. nuclearrabbit77

    nuclearrabbit77 commercial sex worker
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    2
    i agree it is low yield, nevertheless, it is inaccurate.

     
  12. nuclearrabbit77

    nuclearrabbit77 commercial sex worker
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    2
    FA2004. pg 203. HIV diagnosis. "...western blot assay(specific, high false negative rate...."



    false negative rate is defined as "the likelihood that a diseased patient has a normal test result". (Sox et.al, Medical Decision Making p.110)

    what it should say is "a low false positive rate".

    here are the relevant equations you need to know to understand this:

    TPR=true positive rate
    TNR=true negative rate
    FPR=false positive rate
    FNR=false negative rate

    Sensitivity = TPR = a/a+c
    Specificity= TNR = d/b+d
    FNR = 1 - TPR
    FPR= 1- TNR

    thus, the western blot assay with the assumption that it is a very specific test, should have a very high true negative rate. And a very high TNR has a very low false positive rate. Thus, the statement in First Aid is doubly incorrect;-
    1)-TPR and FNR are dependent on sensitivity.
    2)-a good test (even if it were a "SnOUT") would have a low false negative rate not a high one.




    the next error i saw today was on FA 2004 pg 197,


    On the bottom for Delta virus, the Capsid symmetry i believe should be icosahedral. just like Hep B, the source of it's capsid to begin with.

    http://www.stanford.edu/group/virus/delta/2000/classification.html
     
  13. nuclearrabbit77

    nuclearrabbit77 commercial sex worker
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    2
    i'm not so sure about what i said about hep D. hep D gets its envelope from hep B, but that's different than the nucleocapsid geometry...... which wouldn't have to make it icosohedral... if anyone could clarify which type of nucleocapsid geometry hep D has that'd be great..i have two conflicting sources on this one...
     
  14. AlexRusso

    AlexRusso Senior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    someone just started a new thread on this so I figure lets bring the old one back too.


    bump
     

Share This Page