Failed the neuro boards 😞

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sicamore

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Hi guys,
The title tells it all ! I failed the neurology boards in 2022. I’m retaking the test this year. I’m extremely terrified of failing again.
Last time I studied thoroughly 4 or 5 chapters only from Cheng-Ching (the chapters I was weak on).
I scored 227 & the passing score was 247. I surprisingly did the worst in the chapters I reviewed!!!!!!

Please give me your opinions, insights & advices.

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Sorry that happened. If you failed after studying just a few chapters, you should really go back and review ALL the chapters in detail. And by that I mean you should take the key facts in all of the answer explanations and try to commit them to memory as best you can. Understanding is important, but a lot is just brute force memorization. It takes time, so I would start now.

There are also certain things that seem easy in the clinic like treating migraines, but that doesn't necessarily mean its an area of strength on the boards, and if you're scoring low you're giving up lots of points on what should be easy or medium difficulty questions. For example, go back and study the Cheng Ching headache chapter, and you'll be surprised at stuff you didn't realize you didn't know.
 
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Sorry that happened. If you failed after studying just a few chapters, you should really go back and review ALL the chapters in detail. And by that I mean you should take the key facts in all of the answer explanations and try to commit them to memory as best you can. Understanding is important, but a lot is just brute force memorization. It takes time, so I would start now.

There are also certain things that seem easy in the clinic like treating migraines, but that doesn't necessarily mean its an area of strength on the boards, and if you're scoring low you're giving up lots of points on what should be easy or medium difficulty questions. For example, go back and study the Cheng Ching headache chapter, and you'll be surprised at stuff you didn't realize you didn't know.
That’s absolutely true! I just finished reviewing the headache chapter two days ago & WOW ! LOL, I didn’t know I knew nothing about headaches.
Can’t thank you enough
 
That’s absolutely true! I just finished reviewing the headache chapter two days ago & WOW ! LOL, I didn’t know I knew nothing about headaches.
Can’t thank you enough
Many programs are inpatient heavy, so you'll have nearly zero exposure to movement, pain, dementia (aside from late stage folks in hospital), and limited exposure to peds. There's a HUGE difference between being a good neurologist and reading Stiff-Man, picking GAD AB's (an actual question that I forgot when doing my useless recertification - I've never seen a case and never will). Some of this is slightly worthwhile. You will see hemicrania that's indomethacin responsive.

The boards LOVE these insane rare but unique diseases. Studying for these tests is totally unlike being on the floor and taking care of people. So listen, take a deep breath and go easy on yourself. Relax. At the same time, you MUST get your **** together and pass that test. I know this is a paradox, but use the stress to get to work.

Do test questions, build those associations (stiff man, GAD. NMO, MOG and aquaporin antibodies. Etc), build muscle memory and test taking skills. Personally if I were you, I'd take a course. Also, I was a fellow when I studied for these boards. Every day I'd get together with my co-fellows and review, review, review. It didn't even feel like work when we were pitching each other these cases, wondering how they can pitch these situations as questions to trip you up.

Best luck. You will pass.
 
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Many programs are inpatient heavy, so you'll have nearly zero exposure to movement, pain, dementia (aside from late stage folks in hospital), and limited exposure to peds. There's a HUGE difference between being a good neurologist and reading Stiff-Man, picking GAD AB's (an actual question that I forgot when doing my useless recertification - I've never seen a case and never will). Some of this is slightly worthwhile. You will see hemicrania that's indomethacin responsive.

The boards LOVE these insane rare but unique diseases. Studying for these tests is totally unlike being on the floor and taking care of people. So listen, take a deep breath and go easy on yourself. Relax. At the same time, you MUST get your **** together and pass that test. I know this is a paradox, but use the stress to get to work.

Do test questions, build those associations (stiff man, GAD. NMO, MOG and aquaporin antibodies. Etc), build muscle memory and test taking skills. Personally if I were you, I'd take a course. Also, I was a fellow when I studied for these boards. Every day I'd get together with my co-fellows and review, review, review. It didn't even feel like work when we were pitching each other these cases, wondering how they can pitch these situations as questions to trip you up.

Best luck. You will pass.
Can’t thank you enough!!

I WILL PASS IT THIS TIME 💪🏻

It’s just crazy how much they test us on stuff that will probably never see in practice!
 
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How important is it to be board certified? Many jobs only ask for board certified OR board eligible? Is it possible to hold a job at a big private practice long term with a "board eligible" status and never take the board exam?
 
How important is it to be board certified? Many jobs only ask for board certified OR board eligible? Is it possible to hold a job at a big private practice long term with a "board eligible" status and never take the board exam?
From my personal experience, my employment contracts thus far contained statements that requiring me to pass the boards within 2-3 years.
 
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How important is it to be board certified? Many jobs only ask for board certified OR board eligible? Is it possible to hold a job at a big private practice long term with a "board eligible" status and never take the board exam?

I don't think (though I could be wrong) that "board eligibility" lasts forever either.
 
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