finishing up post-doc and having a mini panic attack about law and ethics exam

FreudianSlippers

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So long story short everything has been falling into place. It's my last week of post-doc, EPPP is passed, and I submitted my hours to the CA board of psychology....just waiting on confirmation to take the Law and Ethics Exam (CPLEE). For some reason I JUST realized that if I fail I have to wait 3 F**ING months to re-take it....which would be incredibly bad. I would have to post-pone job applications and probably do the whole psych assistant thing. I wasn't too worried before ( I hear CPLEE is easier than the EPPP) but not i'm kind of freaking out. Anybody have similar experience or words of wisdom in this situation...I can't wait for this process to be over.
 
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WisNeuro

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Haven't taken the CPLEE, but have taken jurisprudence exams in two other states. They are so incredibly easy as to simply be a waste of time IMO. I assume CA has a pdf of relevant statutes to download and look over?
 
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MamaPhD

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Agree w/ WisNeuro. I haven’t taken California’s exam, but my jurisprudence exam was the easiest step in the entire process and I have heard similar things about other states.

I understand the anxiety given what’s on the line for you, but I don’t think you need to worry a lot about this. Just be prepared as you would for any other exam and you will likely do just fine.
 
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PSYDR

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PsyDr's Study Guide for State Law Exams:

1) Read over the materials.
2) Review the following subjects:
a. Sleeping with patients
b. Insurance Fraud
c. Reporting child and elder abuse
d. Admitting patients to the hospital (if your state allows)
e. Record Keeping/ Releasing
3) Then go hit your head against a wall for a while. Drink some everclear. Watch some bad sitcoms. Really, do whatever you can to make yourself a lot dumber. It will definitely help. These tests are made by state officials.
 
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FreudianSlippers

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Nov 28, 2016
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Does California have specialty statutes for telepsych? I imagine so. read over that sh#t too, cuz I was shocked at how many questions I was asked about that stuff that I essentially had to BS my way through.
They definitely do. I read up on them using my test preparation program...but just to be safe i'll also peruse the Board's website for additional info.
 
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FreudianSlippers

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Nov 28, 2016
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The CPLEE was much easier than the EPPP, imo. Although the content was mostly all new to me, its breadth was so narrow compared to the EPPP.

And when in doubt, the answer is always “protect confidentiality”.

You got this.
Thanks Calimich! I appreciate the vote of confidence. It would be tough to imagine that it's harder than the EPPP
 
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FreudianSlippers

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Nov 28, 2016
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PsyDr's Study Guide for State Law Exams:

1) Read over the materials.
2) Review the following subjects:
a. Sleeping with patients
b. Insurance Fraud
c. Reporting child and elder abuse
d. Admitting patients to the hospital (if your state allows)
e. Record Keeping/ Releasing
3) Then go hit your head against a wall for a while. Drink some everclear. Watch some bad sitcoms. Really, do whatever you can to make yourself a lot dumber. It will definitely help. These tests are made by state officials.

Love this! :laugh:
 

Therapist4Chnge

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Be thankful it isn’t an oral exam, as those exist in some states. ;) For written JPEs....every state should have a booklet (PDF these days), so go review it in a hammock for a few hours with a cocktail...that’s how I studied for mine (multiple states).
 
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foreverbull

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I had Psychprep’s written materials (also came with an audio disc) to study for the CPLEE. Definitely far less study time overall than the EPPP (maybe 15-20 hours?), but I found some questions to be quite tricky in the version I was administered, moreso than I expected (having passed the EPPP a month or two before). I found that some questions covered ethical situations that didn’t come up in the study materials (need to know which ethical principle trumps which in any situation, no matter how unrealistic the situation is). That said, I passed anyway, so don’t panic if some of the questions are challenging! The majority pass, regardless. It’s doable, and it’s the last hoop to jump through! You got this.
 
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StellaB

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Not to freak you out, but I have taken multiple state jurisprudence exams and California's is by far the toughest. It is not harder than the EPPP, but I do know someone who passed the EPPP then failed the first attempt at the CPLEE, so it does happen. What is challenging with the CPLEE is that the questions are frequently worded strangely, so they can feel like "trick" questions even if you know the law and ethics guidelines well. It is timed, but I strongly recommend reading through your answers after you have responded to them all. Sometimes on second reading they aren't so hard once you get past the awkward phrasing. You are correct that you would have to wait up to three months to re-take it, but it won't necessarily be that long. Look and see when the new test version is coming out - I think the new tests come out January, April, July, and October. My understanding is you don't have to automatically wait the full three months, you just have to wait until there is a new test version out as you aren't allowed to retake the same one. Use psychprep materials if you can get your hands on them for cheap; the generic info they send you when you register for the test is insufficient IMO.
 

foreverbull

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Not to freak you out, but I have taken multiple state jurisprudence exams and California's is by far the toughest. It is not harder than the EPPP, but I do know someone who passed the EPPP then failed the first attempt at the CPLEE, so it does happen. What is challenging with the CPLEE is that the questions are frequently worded strangely, so they can feel like "trick" questions even if you know the law and ethics guidelines well. It is timed, but I strongly recommend reading through your answers after you have responded to them all. Sometimes on second reading they aren't so hard once you get past the awkward phrasing. You are correct that you would have to wait up to three months to re-take it, but it won't necessarily be that long. Look and see when the new test version is coming out - I think the new tests come out January, April, July, and October. My understanding is you don't have to automatically wait the full three months, you just have to wait until there is a new test version out as you aren't allowed to retake the same one. Use psychprep materials if you can get your hands on them for cheap; the generic info they send you when you register for the test is insufficient IMO.
Like the EPPP, there are different versions, but in this case, it’s a new version every 3 months, some seemingly more difficult than others (although if they are more difficult, scored more leniently so there’s no advantage for the “easier” exam; they will adjust the passing score).

I agree, the version I took was difficult and I didn’t feel confident that I’d passed before I saw my printout ( I didn’t have that feeling taking the EPPP). The questions went beyond the complexity of the questions Sharon Jablon went through in the audio cd that came with the Psychprep materials.

The provided “handout” is nowhere near sufficient to grasp areas like licensure/revocation, EAP, HIPAA/state privacy laws, mandated reporting, risk issues, therapist malpractice, civil commitment, etc. And if someone didn’t want to purchase materials, sifting through the actual regulations (that are not in plain language by any means) would be extremely tedious and time-consuming, particularly since I don’t recall seeing the domains listed anywhere for reference (did I miss this somewhere? ASPPB is clear about the domains on the EPPP, but I don’t recall seeing the domains listed anywhere for CPLEE). In my opinion, without those written practice materials to guide my studying, I wouldn’t have passed.
 

StellaB

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Like the EPPP, there are different versions, but in this case, it’s a new version every 3 months, some seemingly more difficult than others (although if they are more difficult, scored more leniently so there’s no advantage for the “easier” exam; they will adjust the passing score).

I agree, the version I took was difficult and I didn’t feel confident that I’d passed before I saw my printout ( I didn’t have that feeling taking the EPPP). The questions went beyond the complexity of the questions Sharon Jablon went through in the audio cd that came with the Psychprep materials.

The provided “handout” is nowhere near sufficient to grasp areas like licensure/revocation, EAP, HIPAA/state privacy laws, mandated reporting, risk issues, therapist malpractice, civil commitment, etc. And if someone didn’t want to purchase materials, sifting through the actual regulations (that are not in plain language by any means) would be extremely tedious and time-consuming, particularly since I don’t recall seeing the domains listed anywhere for reference (did I miss this somewhere? ASPPB is clear about the domains on the EPPP, but I don’t recall seeing the domains listed anywhere for CPLEE). In my opinion, without those written practice materials to guide my studying, I wouldn’t have passed.
I agree with all of the above. Also felt unsure whether I had passed before getting the printout, but was totally confident I had passed the EPPP.
 
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FreudianSlippers

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Wow, all your answers and feedback are incredibly helpful, thank you all so much. I love this forum. I am still waiting on the board to approve my post-doc hours, but it should be any day now (fingers crossed). I have been using PsychPrep to study for the exam (I passed the EPPP thanks to them) and looking through the rules/regulations handbook. Hopefully I can update further with some good news in the next few weeks :)
 

madpsych78

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Has anyone else taken the Texas Jurisprudence? It's deceptively more difficult than expected IMO. Although you can consult your resources, there are 118 questions you have to complete in 2 hours and you have to get a 90 to pass. The TSBEP information on the Jurisprudence states that the average score for first-time test takers is an 89 - so essentially, the average first-time score is in the failing range. Furthermore, it's an expensive test - $234 per registration. I asked one of my former professors if she would give me pointers for the Texas Jurisprudence and she said that she didn't pass until her third try.