Aerus

Elemental Alchemist
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Apr 21, 2012
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I asked this question before and, from the answers I've gotten, being a URM "helps" you a lot more than being a first generation college student. Note that I say "helps" as a purely statistical word and have not taken historical and institutional disadvantages into account.

Being a first generation college student is still a minor plus. Students without either parents having at least some college education who make it to the interview stage are (according to the answers I've gotten) not common and might even be a rarity.
 
OP
O
Oct 25, 2013
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Pre-Medical
I asked this question before and, from the answers I've gotten, being a URM "helps" you a lot more than being a first generation college student. Note that I say "helps" as a purely statistical word and have not taken historical and institutional disadvantages into account.

Being a first generation college student is still a minor plus. Students without either parents having at least some college education who make it to the interview stage are (according to the answers I've gotten) not common and might even be a rarity.
Okay, thanks. It just seems like a combination of URM and first gen college grad would be even more of a push toward making your application stand out.
 

Aerus

Elemental Alchemist
7+ Year Member
Apr 21, 2012
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Okay, thanks. It just seems like a combination of URM and first gen college grad would be even more of a push toward making your application stand out.
It probably does. But whether this is a mere "additive" push or "symbiotic" push (where both together is worth more than each individually together) is something I don't know and I don't think even matters.
 
OP
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Oct 25, 2013
745
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It probably does. But whether this is a mere "additive" push or "symbiotic" push (where both together is worth more than each individually together) is something I don't know and I don't think even matters.
Alright then. Thanks so much!
 
Nov 24, 2013
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LizzyM mentioned in a different thread that AMCAS places applicants under different classifications based on parental education and occupation, suggesting that they're increasingly encouraging adcoms to evacuate applicants in the context of family background. But I'm sure the URM/first generation benefits vary widely from school to school and among individual readers at the same institution.
 

compstomper

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I searched, and was unable to find any relevant threads. How does this help you (if any at all) if you're 1) URM, and 2) Non-URM? Thanks in advance!
Hi there, while I'm not an insider on the matter, I can share my interview experience with you. I'm an ORM first generation college student from a working class background. This was indicated on my application and I talked about the numerous hardships I had to overcome to get to the interview seat. Most interviewers brought this topic up and discussed it in depth with me. Some even expressed to me how rare it is to have a candidate with my background applying to medical school and getting to the interview stage.

Due to all these factors, I believe that being from an underprivileged background does help with your application, as it shows perseverance in overcoming significant handicaps that other candidates did not face. I'm almost certain that my background contributed to my success this cycle.
 
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