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Whereismynorco

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I dont work for chain so I dont know but can chain make all rphs to dispense some form of naloxone to all the patients who are on opioid with standing order in place?
 

ldiot

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Seeing as how many rphs won't even sell needles I don't expect this to be something you will see too much of.

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I'd refuse needles without an rx on file for an injectable but I'd dispense naloxone. Even if someone didn't want to they would have to come up with a damn good reason seeing how hard the state board is pushing it.
 
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Dr Wario

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I have dispensed exactly 1 naloxone per standing order due the many barriers it still has. In my state the person getting the naloxone is required to get a training certificate (administered by the local health department) before they can get the naloxone, also insurance won't cover it unless it is dispensed to the "intended user" so guess how many times that has happened? I don't know what others are seeing, but from what I can tell this whole program has fallen flat on its face.
 

owlegrad

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I'd refuse needles without an rx on file for an injectable but I'd dispense naloxone. Even if someone didn't want to they would have to come up with a damn good reason seeing how hard the state board is pushing it.
I am sure they will use the eternal excuse of it not being in stock...

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ldiot

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I have dispensed exactly 1 naloxone per standing order due the many barriers it still has. In my state the person getting the naloxone is required to get a training certificate (administered by the local health department) before they can get the naloxone, also insurance won't cover it unless it is dispensed to the "intended user" so guess how many times that has happened? I don't know what others are seeing, but from what I can tell this whole program has fallen flat on its face.
My state has basically no barriers and I have seen a total of 0 dispensed
 

BidingMyTime

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Illinois already had laypeople (technically trained dispensers working underneath an official prescriber...there was paperwork, involved, but the person requesting the naloxone never had to actually see the prescriber) dispensing naloxone before pharmacies started to, like since 2009 or so.....I don't think there have been any requests at all in the retail pharmacy I work in (I don't think we even carry it, we'd have to special order it) but I suspect most people who need the naloxone (and by this, I mean family members of addicts are the ones who are getting the naloxone) have already gotten it. And I think several other states have had laypeople dispensing it also for years, not just Illinois, so this may also explain why pharmacists in other states aren't seeing any requests for Naloxone.

Naloxone use by laypersons has indeed been proven to save lives, I'm not sure why people would resist dispensing naloxone, other than some people hate drug addicts and think they should all die, which is really sad that anyone thinks that.

Then again, I can't understand why anyone would resist dispensing syringes, but then IL specifically changed syringes from RX to OTC with the sole intention of drug users having easy access to them, in order to prevent communicable diseases.
 

ldiot

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So I've always wondered in an emergency situation is it legal to 1) Call 911 2) Administer naloxone 3) Run the script later

My store policy just says to call 911... so do you just call 911 and administer CPR and forget the naloxone?

As stupid as it sounds I could see a caregiver driving the person to the pharmacy instead going to the ER if it is closer.

I figure if a cop can administer it I should be able to.

Same thing with EpiPen, lexi says there are no contradictions in use but this seems even more risky to administer since there is not a standing order. What if someone gets stung in the parking lot, goes into anaphylaxis, and comes running into the pharmacy? If someone is losing their airway I'm thinking anyone in their right mind would administer it but at the same time it seems pretty clearly illegal. Maybe if they have had a script for it in the past it could be considered an emergency fill? IDK
 
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zelman

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So I've always wondered in an emergency situation is it legal to 1) Call 911 2) Administer naloxone 3) Run the script later

My store policy just says to call 911... so do you just call 911 and administer CPR and forget the naloxone?

As stupid as it sounds I could see a caregiver driving the person to the pharmacy instead going to the ER if it is closer.

I figure if a cop can administer it I should be able to.

Same thing with EpiPen, lexi says there are no contradictions in use but this seems even more risky to administer since there is not a standing order. What if someone gets stung in the parking lot, goes into anaphylaxis, and comes running into the pharmacy? If someone is losing their airway I'm thinking anyone in their right mind would administer it but at the same time it seems pretty clearly illegal. Maybe if they have had a script for it in the past it could be considered an emergency fill? IDK
This is a can of worms.

You can use whatever medications have an appropriate standing order. If you have a standing order for naloxone to use on others, do it but it's on you to pay for it (whether that happens before or after use isn't likely addressed in the standing order). If your vaccination protocol allows for the use of an Epi-pen for suspected anaphylaxis, read the fine print. Does it say you need to have given a vaccine first? Mine didn't last year.