For all you premed/med women out there...IUD question

kansaskid

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For those of you in monogamous, heterosexual relationships, have you either considered or chosen an intrauterine device? With the knowledge that medical training can take up to 7 or 8 or 10 years (!), the safe guard of keeping an unplanned pregnancy at bay until you choose to start a family seems pretty appealing. Thoughts?
 

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iduwanna

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If you've never given birth, you're less likely to tolerate an IUD.
 

mmmcdowe

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If you've never given birth, you're less likely to tolerate an IUD.
Well, you know what the say. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shoulda got the IUD.
 

kansaskid

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OncoCaP

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For those of you in monogamous, heterosexual relationships, have you either considered or chosen an intrauterine device? With the knowledge that medical training can take up to 7 or 8 or 10 years (!), the safe guard of keeping an unplanned pregnancy at bay until you choose to start a family seems pretty appealing. Thoughts?
Have you had a baby before? If not, your OB/GYN might not be too excited about an IUD for you. Other options are Depo-Provera are shots every 3 months. Some women really like the patches that you leave on for a week. Oh, and my sister was born with an IUD in her hand, for what it's worth (it didn't hurt her, but they take them out if you get pregnant with them in place nowadays).

Nulliparity and infertility. Nulliparous women have increased rates of discomfort with IUD placement (17.8% vs 8.8%) and may have an increased risk of expulsion (up to 18.5% in one study, compared with less than 5.7% for all IUD users). (6) Short-term ([less than or equal to] 3.5 years) IUD use by nulliparous women was not associated with decreased fertility in a case-control study; (7) however, 1 cohort study demonstrated lower fertility with use of a copper IUD for longer periods: hazard ratio (HR): 0.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.497-0.97) for 42-78 months; HR=0.50 (95% CI, 0.34-0.73) for >78 months.
 
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zenlike

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My g/f is pretty happy with the patch (she'd forget to do the pill every day). She tried the ring once; but she gained a bunch of weight and she got really abraisive (she's normally very sweet).
 

CarrieBad

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I definitely do not recommend the IUD unless you have had kids. A pre-baby cervix really is not prepared for it...
 

236116

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more and more docs are ok with nullpar women having iuds, don't get all hyped about info from the 80's. the ones i know who've got one don't have kids and swear by it.
 

iduwanna

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You don't really need to wait untill you're board-certified to have a child; I suggest "pull-out."
 
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236116

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UCLAMAN

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I definitely do not recommend the IUD unless you have had kids. A pre-baby cervix really is not prepared for it...
with that said...it is possible to place an IUD in a nulliparous cervix. i know nulliparous residents who have them. I wouldnt recommend it either mainly because of the discomfort of insertion but if you are really set on it I am sure you can find a doc who will attempt to put one into a nullip cervix.
 

CarrieBad

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with that said...it is possible to place an IUD in a nulliparous cervix. i know nulliparous residents who have them. I wouldnt recommend it either mainly because of the discomfort of insertion but if you are really set on it I am sure you can find a doc who will attempt to put one into a nullip cervix.
It's not the you won't be able to find a doc willing to do it. I'm just saying it is not at all a pleasant experience... unless you like taking valium and then getting a shot of muscle relaxant right into your cervix, and then the procedure still hurting like hell, and then spending the next 2 months with agonizing cramps... but if you're into that sort of thing, then you'll love it! :)
 

236116

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It's not the you won't be able to find a doc willing to do it. I'm just saying it is not at all a pleasant experience... unless you like taking valium and then getting a shot of muscle relaxant right into your cervix, and then the procedure still hurting like hell, and then spending the next 2 months with agonizing cramps... but if you're into that sort of thing, then you'll love it! :)
Your n=1, I take it?

N=upwards of 30, but I'll go with 30 so I don't have to go back and count, without looking at updated Real Stats From People Who Know What They're Talking About? 25 had no side effects or some minor "hey look cramps"- effects. 4 more? "Bad period." The last? "Really bad period."

Stop trying to scare people.
 

DosCentavos

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i currently work in a family planning clinic and we insert iuds into nulliparous women all the time. no valium, no muscle relaxant in the cervix. yeah, patients complain of cramping, but insertion is quick. as long as the women understand and are educated about the increased risk of PID associated with having an IUD, our physicians are more than happy to give them to childless women.

i had one myself a few years ago. insertion was really uncomfortable (no valium and no muslce relaxant) and i felt like i had a watermelon in my uterus for about a week, but after that, i was fine.

i think as long as a woman understands the side effects of the two common IUDs (mirena, which has progesterone, and paraguard which is all copper) and is well educated about safer sex practices, IUDs are can be a great method of birth control. :)
 

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justdoit31

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I will pass- I have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome so I have to take the pill as well as 2 other medicines nightly- since I am already taking a bunch of other meds why not do the pill!
 

cbrons

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My g/f is pretty happy with the patch (she'd forget to do the pill every day). She tried the ring once; but she gained a bunch of weight and she got really abraisive (she's normally very sweet).
I don't get why they have trouble taking that damn pill everyday. Plan B costs 45 bucks at the pharmacy and I don't exactly like forking that over.

as a tip, plan B is usually cheaper at your schools health center (20 bucks here).
 
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236116

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I don't get why they have trouble taking that damn pill everyday. Plan B costs 45 bucks at the pharmacy and I don't exactly like forking that over.

as a tip, plan B is usually cheaper at your schools health center (20 bucks here).
you try it, major man. :eek: or you know, a condom.

:smuggrin:
 

236116

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Good grief! I'm not trying to scare anyone, it's just important to know what you are getting into. I have a few friends who have tried it and most have had a similar experience.
sorry, i get twitchy when people look threatening toward repro choices. i wonder... did the same one do them? maybe it's technique?
 

CarrieBad

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You have a right to choose any birth control method that tickles your fancy! I just think it's nice to have some info about what you are getting into.
 

236116

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You have a right to choose any birth control method that tickles your fancy! I just think it's nice to have some info about what you are getting into.
:)

unfortunately the only easy reliable cheap method i can use is abstinence. :( stupid body.
 

pianola

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you try it, major man. :eek: or you know, a condom.

:smuggrin:
:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:

Good grief! I'm not trying to scare anyone, it's just important to know what you are getting into. I have a few friends who have tried it and most have had a similar experience.
+1 to her n. My best friend got an IUD (never had a baby) and she enjoyed a few months of cramps.
 

NiCad089

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House: "Skirt that tight, you got no secrets. Skirt that tight, I can tell if you've got an IUD."
 

OncoCaP

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:)

unfortunately the only easy reliable cheap method i can use is abstinence. :( stupid body.
You do have other options, but there are risk/benefit tradeoffs. Despite its high failure rate, there are many people who use the rhythm method (see for example http://www.epigee.org/guide/rhythm.html). I know several people who have used it with no failures (as has my wife). When we wanted to get pregnant, it was the usual plus rhythm method in reverse (plus added basal temp for greater accuracy). It does have a high failure rate and is completely inappropriate for your typical premed or med student. To be able to use this method successfully, it really helps if the woman has a very regular cycle, and even then the woman needs to have a very good handle on what is going on throughout her cycle, using various ovulation checks such as basal temp and ovulation testers to establish a very clear idea of the usual pattern and common variations that come about with stress and illness. After a while you might be able to tell when she's getting close to ovulation from signs like the viscosity & stringiness of the vaginal mucus alone (but I wouldn't start with that until you have several years of experience). Of course, the only people I know who use this method are married, a situation in which you're not (hopefully) especially worried about STD's, and, if she does get pregnant it was something the couple was prepared to deal with even if it wasn't the current plan.

The rhythm method is a complicated, low reliability method compared to just taking a pill, patch or using an IUD, but if you can't tolerate the hormonal methods, don't like condoms, are irritated by spermicides, don't want an IUD in the uterus, don't want to bother with a cervical cap, you start to run out of other options.

Here is a good site for information on the various methods:
http://contraceptiononline.org/patient-handouts/

Side effects for the Mirena IUD are ...
"Changes in menstrual bleeding patterns are the most common side effects of the IUS. During the first 3 to 6 months of use, the number of days of bleeding and spotting increases and bleeding patterns become irregular.
... Other side effects include lower abdominal pain or cramping, reported by about 10% of users during the first 3 months. Side effects occurring in fewer than 5% of women include acne or other skin problems, back pain, breast tenderness, headache, mood changes, and nausea.

Copper ... "Some women who use the IUD have more bleeding during and between their periods. The copper IUD also can cause cramps which can be helped by an over-the-counter pain medicine like ibuprofen or naproxen. The cramps can go away after the first few months as the uterus gets used to the IUD."
 

Chango

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If you've never given birth, you're less likely to tolerate an IUD.

Interesting to see people discouraging IUDs... I have one and it is great! The consensus among my gyn and the doctors I worked with at a OB/GYN clinic said that it is mainly discouraged for those who have not had a baby because of the discomfort and the potential risks for STIs if individuals are not in monogamous relationships. Other than that, they said it was a shame that it is not used more in the US as it is the most effective and least expensive birth control options.

I went this route because of the effectiveness without hormones. I have worked with far too many women/teens who have become pregnant on the patch and Depo shots for me to feel comfortable with those methods.

Just my opinion.
 

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I have a blood clotting disorder and cannot use any sort of contraception containing hormones. I finally had an IUD put in last January and it was one of the best decisions I made concerning my reproductive system. The insertion was incredibly painful... for 10 seconds! After that, I felt a little woozy for about 2 hours, but then I went shopping later that day. I have had terrible cramps my whole life, and for me the IUD actually made them better. I love it!!! Highly recommend it. After my OBgyn did the insertion, she said, "Ten years of birth control, done!" Personally, I think you hear more bad stuff about them because people are more likely to complain about IUDs (or anything) when they've had a negative experience, rather than actually remember their IUD is there and say something positive! haha.
 
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Aren't there both hormonal and nonhormonaly IUDs? And I gotta ask, are IUDs/condoms the most prevalent birth control devices? I'm not really sure how often family planning, diaphragms, or the pill are used.
 

dk33

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My OB was pretty encouraging of me wanting an IUD after I had a baby. I love it and I think it was the best decision I couldve made with regard to my reproductive health. I am not compliant with a 5 day z-pack....I dont think I would make a great candidate for PO birth control pills. I have always heard it is not encouraged in nulliparous women mostly cuz of the pain and the fact that it is more often expelled, but from what Ive seen on this thread, seems like lots of women w/o kids are getting IUDs! for anyone who is monogamous and doesnt want to think about kids for a few years, I think its the best option there is.
 

HeatherMD

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the pill has kept me baby-free thus far, and I trust it to continue to succeed until after age 30.

I'm not interested in IUD's. I don't see the point since the pill is so convenient for me, but if other women are out of options, they might as well get one.
 

diosa428

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Aren't there both hormonal and nonhormonaly IUDs? And I gotta ask, are IUDs/condoms the most prevalent birth control devices? I'm not really sure how often family planning, diaphragms, or the pill are used.
The Mirena IUD is hormonal (progesterone) and the copper IUD is non-hormonal. The copper IUD can cause menorrhagia, but it's effective in women who don't tolerate hormones and aren't allergic to copper.
 

Fatima41200

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Just do what I do and take the morning after pill every morning after.
 

gujuDoc

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I will pass- I have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome so I have to take the pill as well as 2 other medicines nightly- since I am already taking a bunch of other meds why not do the pill!
Man i used to feel like I was the only one with this problem. But i have the same disorder and use the Yaz pill, and it seems like Imeet more people these day with this problem.

So I feel your pain. I think the pill is easier too.
 

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This is maybe a dumb thread to necro, idk, but I'm kind of an IUD fanatic (though I've never had one myself).

You do NOT have to be in a monogamous relationship to have an IUD put in. The evidence is pretty clear. If you do not currently have chlamydia or gonorrhea and you haven't had PID like, yesterday, the IUD does NOT increase your risk of PID just by simply being inserted. If you have unprotected sex in the 90 days following insertion, your risk of PID is increased, but after that it is the same as that of the general population.

So get tested and use common sense and protection. Which everyone should be doing anyway unless they've been with their partner for a while. I mean monogamy is still the least risky option, but I would have no qualms personally with putting an IUD in someone who is between boyfriends and doesn't have the clap.
 

kasmir8199

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For those of you in monogamous, heterosexual relationships, have you either considered or chosen an intrauterine device? With the knowledge that medical training can take up to 7 or 8 or 10 years (!), the safe guard of keeping an unplanned pregnancy at bay until you choose to start a family seems pretty appealing. Thoughts?
I have the Mirena and it works well for me. The only issue that gets me is the fact that I now have unpredictable and sometimes irregular menstral cycles. I can go months without without a period and there have been a few instances where I've had them twice a month (no fun). Just be mindful of the type you get if you get one. Mirenas have to be replaced every 5 years. The copper IUDs last about twice as long form what I hear.
 

einstein1990

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I have Mirena and I have NOT had a baby before, ha! I've had a great experience with it, anyone who wants more info - feel free to PM me. I'm willing to elaborate, just not in a public thread :p
 

oliveoil123

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An IUD is no problem from nulliparous women! If the cervix is tight, they'll just give the patient miso to ripen the cervix a bit. Its no big deal. Its such a great method!
 

MedPR

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For those of you in monogamous, heterosexual relationships, have you either considered or chosen an intrauterine device? With the knowledge that medical training can take up to 7 or 8 or 10 years (!), the safe guard of keeping an unplanned pregnancy at bay until you choose to start a family seems pretty appealing. Thoughts?
Apparently IUDs increase risk of infertility especially when removing it.
 

SeminoleVesicle

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Know someone that has one. She's null par and has an off cycle and heavy cramps occasionally. She's pretty satisfied tho.
 
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I personally think that the pill + condoms are the best combination for me. IUDs are just too expensive for me to justify.
 
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Belle Melodie

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For those of you in monogamous, heterosexual relationships, have you either considered or chosen an intrauterine device? With the knowledge that medical training can take up to 7 or 8 or 10 years (!), the safe guard of keeping an unplanned pregnancy at bay until you choose to start a family seems pretty appealing. Thoughts?
I have a 2.5 year old and i am currently pregnant with #2. After this pregnancy i will definitely get the IUD (10 years). By then I shall be 37 and who wants to have kids at that age? (not me). Once the 10 years is up i plan to put on another IUD. I'd like to think im done with having children. Pregnancy and I dont get along too well.

:thumbup:
 
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