DPPM

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How important is it to leave on a good relationship with an employer (in the context of applying to med school)?

Here's my situation: I'm an accountant working for a CPA firm (I've been there for only five months), but I decided a little while ago that I want to pursue a career in medicine. I'd like to leave right now to start on prerequisites and volunteer experience, but I'm worried that since it's busy season (peak time of year for accountants), it might leave my current employer sour.

So my question: by leaving now, would I later on risk a prospective med school calling my employer and finding an employer with not-so-nice things to say, or should I not consider this? I am certain that I am going to leave to pursue medicine, it is simply a question of now or later. Advice would be sincerely appreciated. Thanks.
 

njbmd

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DPPM said:
How important is it to leave on a good relationship with an employer (in the context of applying to med school)?

Here's my situation: I'm an accountant working for a CPA firm (I've been there for only five months), but I decided a little while ago that I want to pursue a career in medicine. I'd like to leave right now to start on prerequisites and volunteer experience, but I'm worried that since it's busy season (peak time of year for accountants), it might leave my current employer sour.

So my question: by leaving now, would I later on risk a prospective med school calling my employer and finding an employer with not-so-nice things to say, or should I not consider this? I am certain that I am going to leave to pursue medicine, it is simply a question of now or later. Advice would be sincerely appreciated. Thanks.
Hi there,
Very few (if any) of the medical schools that you apply to will call any of your former employers. Sure it would be nice to leave when your employers is not busy and at full staff but you have to be a bit selfish about YOUR career. Leave when it is right for you and you have everything in place to begin your quest. Many people leave employment for less compelling reasons. Just be sure to comply with notice, finishing projects etc and try to be as positive (help your replacement get settled)and professional as possible. Other than leaving with class and dignity, you really don't owe your employer anything other than a full days work up until you leave.

njbmd :)
 

OrthoFixation

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I'm non-trad too, starting med this August. I have yet to inform my employer and have never had them contacted by schools that I applied.

The closest thing was a LOR written by a close associate at a previous employer. I have never heard of LOR writers being contacted directly either, although it may happen occaisionally.

Do you plan on taking your missing pre-reqs starting in August or June? In August, the tax season should be dwindling somewhat, even for extension filers due Oct 15.

I would consider your needs first, giving adequate notice as njbmd mentioned. However, two weeks is not enough time to find and hire a competent professional. It's barely enough time to get resumes flowing in, based on public advertising.

If your replacement will be a current internal colleague, then it becomes much easier. If your replacement will be a new hire and you want to help your employer, consider giving 4 weeks notice instead of 2. Just be prepared for the employer to tell you adios when you give notice, regardless of how much time is involved. It all depends on their level of integrity and what they visualize you contributing in the interim period.

Employees that are departing can be a real drain on the moral of those that remain. Management knows this, particularly if you are going to a competitor. If I gave notice and they said pack up today . . . compensation should be paid for the interim period. Unless they can fire you for cause, you are owed compensation until the date of your resignation. If you mutually agree to change the date, that's another thing.

Good luck on your journey :luck:
 
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DPPM

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OrthoFixation said:
Do you plan on taking your missing pre-reqs starting in August or June? In August, the tax season should be dwindling somewhat, even for extension filers due Oct 15.

I would consider your needs first, giving adequate notice as njbmd mentioned. However, two weeks is not enough time to find and hire a competent professional. It's barely enough time to get resumes flowing in based on public advertising.
Thanks to the both of you for your replies. Ortho, tax season actually dies down around April 15, so really it's not too much longer. I don't plan on starting the prereqs until June (too late to sign up for the spring). To be honest though, I don't like the job all that much, and I feel I'm putting a lot of hard work in right now that I could be putting towards a medical career instead (volunteering, working at a hospital etc.), even if it is just for an extra two months or so. But I think you're right, if I decide to leave I'll certainly give more than 2 wks notice.
 

OrthoFixation

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Not liking the job makes the decision easier if money is not the central issue. If you like and respect your superior and don't feel they'll shaft you out of spite, more than two weeks may be courteous.

I am struggling with this too. Another issue is the potential for creating an odd aura or environment with your colleagues. When people know you will be breaking away from the team to go on your merry way, they might isolate you (me).

That is great news, your starting in June. Going back full time will really expedite the process. Make the grades and kill the MCAT. Good luck :luck: :thumbup: :luck: