Good substitutes for PDAs

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by Doctor4Life1769, Dec 30, 2008.

  1. Doctor4Life1769

    Doctor4Life1769 **tr0llin, ridin dirty**
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    Let's say I can't afford to dole out the cash for a PDA, and I'm doing just fine with my current phone and service. What are some good pocket books or guides to have with you in general?

    I'm interested in something for the Pharm/Drugs, OB/IM/Surg/EM/Psych/Anesthesia

    Thanks!
     
  2. LadyWolverine

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    I swear by the "Practical Guide to the Care of the Medical Patient" - it's kinda bulky for your pocket, but it runs circles around Pocket Medicine as far as I'm concerned. I used it for everything on my medicine rotation - it was great.

    FWIW, the answer to some very obscure CPC cases were in this book. I thought that was pretty cool.
     
  3. SouthernSurgeon

    Physician Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 7+ Year Member

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    Must haves:
    -Pocket medicine. Not to disagree with the above poster, but I love this book. Everyone in medicine (students, interns, residents, even the occasional fellow/attending) seems to keep this in their pocket
    -If you are really going computer-free: Tarascon's pharmacopeia (sp?) and a printout of the Walmart $4 formulary
    -Sanford Abx guide

    Rotation specific:
    -Peds: Harriet Lane is big, and probably way over the top for a student, but it is a must have for peds residents
    -Medicine: Pocket medicine
    -Surgery: Surgical Recall (but this is more for your learning than for a general reference)
    -OB: There is this thick, squat book (Obstetrics, Gynecology, Infertility) with a blue/red cover that is pretty nice, but very detailed. Probably more an intern-level book than a student level book. I got one for free but more or less never used it.
     
  4. greenbean

    greenbean Junior Member
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    dont bother getting a pda, no body uses them, u can easily look up stuff on a computer and print out an uptodate article that u want to read in your down time
    if u insist on carrying a portable brain, most will swear by pocket medicine; i would recommend a little book i used in my intership called internal medicine by the guys at harvard, it small and w/ a red cover; has great mnemonics and is actually on key with boards; also get a pharmacopeia(u will use it more in internship)

    if u need to get a cell phone, consider the iphone or a blackberry so u can get epocrates
     
  5. troopa

    troopa Senior Member
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    One word: iphone
     
  6. Doctor4Life1769

    Doctor4Life1769 **tr0llin, ridin dirty**
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    I suppose you missed the point of this thread? I already have a perfectly good phone with a service (NOT cingular) - why do I need to cancel the service I do have, buy an overpriced iphone and tack on an overpriced service plan? :sleep:

    To the rest, thank you for your advice/suggestions. If anyone has any other suggestions, please post. I do not have upperclassmen to ask for advice (I am at a new DO program).
     
  7. troopa

    troopa Senior Member
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    Because the iphone is much much more than just a phone. It's also got epocrates which has come in handy more times than i could count (by the way I am an upperclassman). It is definitely worth the cost if you actually use the bells and whistles.
    I'm sorry I missed the point of the thread...you titled it "Good substitutes for PDAs" while the iphone is definitely an "awesomely great substitute for dinosaur antiquated technology known as PDAs."
     
  8. tazaman

    tazaman New Member
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    You might want to consider obtaining an itouch. I too did not want to get an iphone b/c of the service plan but the touch has wifi access and pretty much does everything you need for most of your rotations like epocrates and also access uptodate and so forth.

    Plus you can check your e-mail and the added perk of having your music w/ ya.

    I thought it was a pretty awesome solution and its worked out well for me thus far.
     
  9. MeowMix

    MeowMix Explaining "Post-Call"
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    Pocket Medicine + Tarascon pharmacopeia + Sanford covers 90% of what I need on an everyday basis. I don't even carry my PDA.

    Add Tarascon crit care + the small red Ob/Gyn book if those are relevant.

    PM me your address and I'll mail you my 2007 Sanford which is basically still current.
     

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