Hawaii looks to allow psychologists to prescribe drugs (HB 1072 bill)

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thoffen

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I have met some psychologists that know enough pharmacology and medicine and have the right skills to know when they are in over their heads, such that I think I would rather them have the prescription pad than a ton of psychiatrists I've encountered.

And I have met psychologists that know enough pharmacology to be dangerous, and disturbingly little medicine at all.

Funny enough, the first psychologist (smalltownpsych) tends to have no interest in prescribing meds, and the second psychologist tends to not understand why it's controversial to let them prescribe in the first place.

I'm sure there's a middle ground. I would imagine the compelling argument to let psychologists prescribe is because of the dearth of psychiatrists in certain areas. I would have to see some data on states who have passed such legislation to see if it even puts a dent in this problem.
 

smalltownpsych

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I have met some psychologists that know enough pharmacology and medicine and have the right skills to know when they are in over their heads, such that I think I would rather them have the prescription pad than a ton of psychiatrists I've encountered.

And I have met psychologists that know enough pharmacology to be dangerous, and disturbingly little medicine at all.

Funny enough, the first psychologist (smalltownpsych) tends to have no interest in prescribing meds, and the second psychologist tends to not understand why it's controversial to let them prescribe in the first place.

I'm sure there's a middle ground. I would imagine the compelling argument to let psychologists prescribe is because of the dearth of psychiatrists in certain areas. I would have to see some data on states who have passed such legislation to see if it even puts a dent in this problem.
One reason for that dichotomy could be that a good psychologist is busy enough, achieves measurable results, and can even make a decent living without dealing with medications. I would imagine there are a percentage of psychologists who are not that competent at what they are supposed to be doing already whether that is with psychotherapy, assessment, or research/academeia who think that maybe getting another privilege would help. Mainly though, I think the push is coming from a relatively few psychologists in leadership positions who are getting funding from...? You know what they say, follow the money.
 
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I'm sure there's a middle ground. I would imagine the compelling argument to let psychologists prescribe is because of the dearth of psychiatrists in certain areas. I would have to see some data on states who have passed such legislation to see if it even puts a dent in this problem.

I haven't heard of any such study so far. It would not very complicated in terms of design and analysis, but it would be labor intensive to verify records, etc. and that would require funding. I wonder who would fund that. Maybe American Psychiatric Association. ;)

But anecdotally, I've heard that prescribing psychologists cluster in urban areas just like the regular psychologists (and psychiatrists) tend to do.
 

nitemagi

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I haven't heard of any such study so far. It would not very complicated in terms of design and analysis, but it would be labor intensive to verify records, etc. and that would require funding. I wonder who would fund that. Maybe American Psychiatric Association. ;)

But anecdotally, I've heard that prescribing psychologists cluster in urban areas just like the regular psychologists (and psychiatrists) tend to do.
If you go through the list of RxPs in LA and NM, most of them are in urban centers.
 

WisNeuro

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Then yes, the statement is accurate. But, I would think a catchment area would be a more nuanced way to see if an effect is made in terms of increasing access to care. Like those practicing in places like Grants, Hobbs, or Roswell seeing patients who otherwise may have needed to go to El Paso or Albuquerque. Tough to say without patient info, but we can't look at access as only providers within a certain community, or all of our data across the spectrum would be off, for multiple provider types.
 

nitemagi

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Then yes, the statement is accurate. But, I would think a catchment area would be a more nuanced way to see if an effect is made in terms of increasing access to care. Like those practicing in places like Grants, Hobbs, or Roswell seeing patients who otherwise may have needed to go to El Paso or Albuquerque. Tough to say without patient info, but we can't look at access as only providers within a certain community, or all of our data across the spectrum would be off, for multiple provider types.
At this point I'd take any real unfiltered data on the issue, frankly.
 
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