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iwannaplaylock

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I am currently in grd 10, 15 years old and live in Canada. I want to get into dental school and I need some advice about everything(tips,advice....) Is getting into dental school more about hard work or intelligence? If you finish dentistry school can you go straight into orthodontics? Or do you have to pratice for awhile? Can any dentist go into orthodontics? Or do you need to do well in dentistry to get in? How can increase my manual dexterity? Is there anything else should I be doing? What are some good characteristics a good dentist/orthodontist needs to get into dentistry? Any comment are appreciated. Thanks in advance!(pardon any mistakes i am in a rush...)
 

xdianaax

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I am currently in grd 10, 15 years old and live in Canada. I want to get into dental school and I need some advice about everything(tips,advice....) Is getting into dental school more about hard work or intelligence? If you finish dentistry school can you go straight into orthodontics? Or do you have to pratice for awhile? Can any dentist go into orthodontics? Or do you need to do well in dentistry to get in? How can increase my manual dexterity? Is there anything else should I be doing? What are some good characteristics a good dentist/orthodontist needs to get into dentistry? Any comment are appreciated. Thanks in advance!

Listen, I don't want to be the bearer of bad news but you're really young to be thinking about orthodontics...worry about undergrad first, it's good that you have all this motivation, but you're thinking way to much into it, get into a college first, or try for one of those 7 year programs. You're 15 years old, you don't need to hassle yourself with silly thoughts of orthodontics. Get into college do well, and the rest will fall into place. And just to answer your question, Orthodontics is a specialty you go into after you've completed your 4 years of dental school, and in order to get an ortho residency you need to do really well in dental school. But it all starts from your first year in college, so just worry about where you are now.
 
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Sprgrover

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Listen, I don't want to be the bearer of bad news but you're really young to be thinking about orthodontics...worry about undergrad first, it's good that you have all this motivation, but you're thinking way to much into it, get into a college first, or try for one of those 7 year programs. You're 15 years old, you don't need to hassle yourself with silly thoughts of orthodontics. Get into college do well, and the rest will fall into place. And just to answer your question, Orthodontics is a specialty you go into after you've completed your 4 years of dental school, and in order to get an ortho residency you need to do really well in dental school. But it all starts from your first year in college, so just worry about where you are now.

I agree and I'd also like to add that it's really important to take time and enjoy your youth and where you are right now and where you will be in the time leading up to dental school. Be sure to travel, take some courses COMPLETELY unrelated to your pursuit of dentistry (art, literature, etc.) and so on. Dentistry will still be around but, as one grows older, many of these opportunities will not. Best of luck!:thumbup:
 

pre-dentalguy

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Young sir... just enjoy your time in high school and get into a good school. Don't rush to grow up so quickly. Believe me, it will come much faster than you think.

So as for now, focus on getting into a good school by doing well on the SAT. Once you're in, focus on keeping a good gpa. Once you're in your second year of college, then start focusing on D-School. You've still got 4-5 more years to go. That's a long time from now.

Take care of yourself between now then.

PDG
 

iwannaplaylock

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don't worry i am living my youth to the fullest... just wanted to be 1 step a head u noe lol.... but still any advice? and thanks for the input
 

dentalwannabee

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if you're set on dentistry, check out these programs
If i knew at 15 that i wanted to be a dentist i would have gone for them.

Case Western, NYU (at numerous different undergrads), Creighton, and I believe USC also has programs like UOP. That is by far the easiest way to get into dental school.

Check out predents.com to get the school's websites, and look for their guaranteed program. Some are better than others in that you are guaranteed, and others you need to get a certain GPA (and the school makes it very difficult to get that GPA).

I would look into those seriously.
 

johntara04

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I am currently in grd 10, 15 years old and live in Canada. I want to get into dental school and I need some advice about everything(tips,advice....) Is getting into dental school more about hard work or intelligence? If you finish dentistry school can you go straight into orthodontics? Or do you have to pratice for awhile? Can any dentist go into orthodontics? Or do you need to do well in dentistry to get in? How can increase my manual dexterity? Is there anything else should I be doing? What are some good characteristics a good dentist/orthodontist needs to get into dentistry? Any comment are appreciated. Thanks in advance!(pardon any mistakes i am in a rush...)

My advice is this: Go work for a dentist, follow them around, ask as many questions as you can, try to see as many different procedures as you can (hop between a couple of offices if you need to). Do good in school, keep your grades up (do this anyways so even if you do change your mind about dentistry, you can still do whatever you want to. As with anything in life, "hard work is mistaken for genius." So, natural smarts (intelligence) is needed, but usually the people who study the most do the best. If your grades/board scores are good enough you can get into Ortho straight away, but as others said, just work hard, enjoy the journey, and that will take care of itself. Check out those accelerated courses that others have posted. I wish I would of done something like that.

There are a ton of things to improve your manual dexterity. This is the fun part. You can play musical instruments, video games (corny, but it does improve the dexterity of your hands), sew, paint, build model cars, fly fish, etc, etc. Do whatever you enjoy. Have fun with it.

Also, enjoy your life. The more rounded you are as a doctor, the more you will be able to connect with a wide variety of patients, the more they will trust you, the more they will accept your treatment plans and the healthier they will be.

Finally, Ortho is a great goal to have, but be sure that you will be happy doing another specialty and/or general dentistry. Ortho is very hard to get into, and you don't want to hate your career choice with $200,000+ in debt. Good luck. Feel free to pm me with any additional questions you may have.
 

diane07

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I agree with the others . . . enjoy high school and college first.

I noticed that you want to get into a dental school that is in British Columbia. If that's the case, then just make sure to meet that school's requirements. But as a side, if you were ever interested in US dental schools - make sure you research each one because some require pre-requisites to be done at a US college/university.

Anyway, just enjoy being young and make sure to have some fun too.
 

dontwakeme

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Everyone always says, "Enjoy your youth while it lasts." Is it that absurd that someone be interested in dentistry at a young age? Maybe, just maybe, this person doesn't think of their education and career as some dreaded chore, but rather as something exciting, enjoyable, and interesting.

It's possible to enjoy your life AND have aspirations at the same time. The two things are not mutually exclusive.
 

PhysEd

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My advice: work hard to get into the undergrad program you want most (even if its not directly related to dentistry) because you will do best studying what you enjoy the most. You may want to study your undergrad at UBC as the dental school there may favour their own students (not too sure about that though). Ensure that you have all the prerequisites to the UBC dental school and to other schools and other programs as your career plans may change in the future. Consider US dental schools as well because there are not too many dental schools in Canada and that means extreme competition...UBC d-school is quite expensive so the cost of studying in the south may not seem that bad at all.
As others have mentioned, spend time at a dental office, shadow your dentist and ask him/her lots of questions. Examine what they do there and the environment and then ask yourself is that what you really wanna do?
Finally, as grades are really important, the difference between getting in or not may come down to your extra-curricular involvement. So as many others have stated here, make sure you have fun in school and play on the sports teams you normally do and join the clubs you like...dont sacrifice them just to stuff yourself in a textbook to obtain a 4.0.

Goodluck!
 

shamrock2006

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My advice...get through some of your science courses and then see how interested you still are. Realize that those harder science courses in undergrad are only going to get harder in d-school and then see if you want to put yourself through that. also, start shadowing maybe late freshman, early sophomore year..just to get a jump. Right now it's so early that you might come across something you like more. Not to steer you away from dentistry, i'm just saying dont put all your eggs in one basket at this point. See what else is out there, and if you find yourself constantly coming back to dentistry..then it's a go. best of luck.
 

collegeboy30000

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Everyone always says, "Enjoy your youth while it lasts." Is it that absurd that someone be interested in dentistry at a young age? Maybe, just maybe, this person doesn't think of their education and career as some dreaded chore, but rather as something exciting, enjoyable, and interesting.

It's possible to enjoy your life AND have aspirations at the same time. The two things are not mutually exclusive.

Finally someone said it! This kid is going to be way ahead of the game, and very prepared because he knows at a very young age what he wants to do with his life, congrats to you.

I don't know where you live, but you should definitely start looking for undergraduate schools that offer the B.S./D.M.D.[or B.S./D.D.S.] combined programs and then you won't have to endure the emotional roller coaster that is the "application process", and you will save a ton of money!

Best of luck.
 

pmantz

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My advice is, block this web site from your web brouser, maybe until you are getting geared up to take the DAT and apply. Seriously this forum sucks the acedemic life blood(time) out of me.
 

Sprgrover

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Everyone always says, "Enjoy your youth while it lasts." Is it that absurd that someone be interested in dentistry at a young age? Maybe, just maybe, this person doesn't think of their education and career as some dreaded chore, but rather as something exciting, enjoyable, and interesting.

It's possible to enjoy your life AND have aspirations at the same time. The two things are not mutually exclusive.

I certainly don't view my education and future career as a dreaded chore. However, while I was in undergrad, my advisors STRONGLY urged me to slow down for various reasons. I grudgingly let one of them talk me into going to Europe and then taking time off. At the time I was unsure if I should have been doing it but, looking back, I realize that it was the right thing for me to do.

No one is saying that aspirations and enjoying life are mutually exclusive. What people are getting at is that often students myopically focus on their aspirations and forgo the chance for exploration and enrichment outside of their studies. A few of my friends here in dental school rushed through undergrad, one them is doing a seven year program, and are now discovering that they really would have benefited from either time off, taking courses in literature, business, and so on, traveling, and the like. They still like dentistry but they also are a bit sad about this. Why don't they just do all this after graduation? Well, as a professional and an adult there are certain obligations and responsibilities that make opening certain doors that were once available but are now closed. Re-payment of loans, spouse and family obligations, mortgages, car payments, insurance, not to mention your practise - which is a business and just doesn't run itself - are just a few of the many ways in which a life can get very complicated very quickly. Aspirations are a good thing - I certainly wouldn't be where I am today without them - but as someone that has taken time off from school, who has worked in the 'real' world prior to dental school and who is older than the average dental student I think it is good advice to tell younger students that it's important for them to take advantage of where they are right now and to enjoy themselves because the circumstances they are in now will never be the same later on.
 
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I do not think it hurts to have a general plan for your future.

As an addict of CollegeConfidential, a website very similar to SDN for high school overachievers, I can say that this person is not that bad.

Paranoid high school students with 4.0 UW, 2400, 10 leadership positions, 30 awards, and 1000 volunteer hours overwhelm CollegeConfidential forums.

Threads about their chances are very common, and even middle school students sometimes appear and ask about how to plan high school schedules for the Ivy League.

It is quite ridiculous.

Nevertheless, preparation helps out in moderation.

Currently, I am impatiently waiting for acceptance letters from my colleges. After I graduate from my dreadful high school, I plan to visit Las Vegas with my parents and see KÀ, one of Cirque du Soleil's many fantastic shows :love:. (I really recommend this troupe to everyone. It is amazing!) Then I am going to research dentistry and check out what my career options are. At this point, I just want to know what those -dontics really are.

I certainly will not visit every single dental school in the United States and shop for DAT study guides though. Now that would be going way too far.

Once again, I think a little bit of preparation does not hurt.
 

leedizzal

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It sure dosent hurt but ive got to say I had no idea what I wanted to do when I was in Highschool and ive done a little of a lot of stuff in undergrad....


Looking back I think its given me a much rounder education that I would have ever gotten if I had just simply slammed out the exact classes I needed and gone straight to dentistry..

At his age and the age he will be when he is getting ready to start dental school, you change so much that you might not even be interested in dentistry any more...

For instance I wanted to be a commercial airline pilot coming out of highschool... I got my commercial pilots license by my second year of college and decided flying was not for me really dident want to do it any more and switched over to a different major...

As many have said on here enjoy your youth dont speed it up... Really enjoy Undergrad ive made some of the best friends of my life in undergrad and had some of the best times of my life in undergrad.... I used to think the day would never come when I would be done with college and one day you wake up and its all gone already your marching for your college graduation...

Any way Good luck and never hurts to start checking out your options id say focus on doing well in undergrad to start with then start thinkin bout dent school then maybe a specialty....
 

dontwakeme

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I certainly don't view my education and future career as a dreaded chore. However, while I was in undergrad, my advisors STRONGLY urged me to slow down for various reasons. I grudgingly let one of them talk me into going to Europe and then taking time off. At the time I was unsure if I should have been doing it but, looking back, I realize that it was the right thing for me to do.

No one is saying that aspirations and enjoying life are mutually exclusive. What people are getting at is that often students myopically focus on their aspirations and forgo the chance for exploration and enrichment outside of their studies. A few of my friends here in dental school rushed through undergrad, one them is doing a seven year program, and are now discovering that they really would have benefited from either time off, taking courses in literature, business, and so on, traveling, and the like. They still like dentistry but they also are a bit sad about this. Why don't they just do all this after graduation? Well, as a professional and an adult there are certain obligations and responsibilities that make opening certain doors that were once available but are now closed. Re-payment of loans, spouse and family obligations, mortgages, car payments, insurance, not to mention your practise - which is a business and just doesn't run itself - are just a few of the many ways in which a life can get very complicated very quickly. Aspirations are a good thing - I certainly wouldn't be where I am today without them - but as someone that has taken time off from school, who has worked in the 'real' world prior to dental school and who is older than the average dental student I think it is good advice to tell younger students that it's important for them to take advantage of where they are right now and to enjoy themselves because the circumstances they are in now will never be the same later on.

What, exactly, constitutes enjoying your youth? People are different. We all have different passions and things that bring us pleasure in life. To some people, partying brings happiness. Others, education is their drive in life. Yet, we still equate the person who enjoys partying as someone who is living life to the fullest and "enjoying their youth," while the person who finds solace in academic pursuits at a young age is worrying too much about the future.

The point I'm trying to make is that it is possible to have genuine interest in something academic - in the same way that you have interest in something considered "fun." Society has ingrained in our minds that the only way to "live life to the fullest" or "enjoy your youth" is to do things the majority of people thing are fun i.e. party, be reckless etc. Some people find interest in other things.
 
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