Honey cure...

Discussion in 'Pre-Podiatry Students' started by iwilldlvr, May 5, 2007.

  1. iwilldlvr

    iwilldlvr not listening
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  3. Feli

    Feli ACFAS Member
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    Very nteresting stuff! Thanks for posting it...

    A ton of great research comes from Wisconsin (ie WARFarin), so I'll be keeping an eye out for the publication of results on this.
     
  4. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest
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    Very interesting. We have a project using Vick's VapoRub on onychomycosis. So, it is always interesting to see alternative medicine put thorough EBM.

    My biggest worry is that if the EBM doesn't stand up, now that this info is on the web we will have people trying it all of the time. They may not seek help until it is too late.

    Also, Dr. Jennifer Eddy is a family practice doctor and I would hope that she was smart enough to send pedal ulcers to an infectious disease doctor or a podiatrist. I don't know one family practice physician that has OR rights, so without a pod consulting (F&A orthopods usually don't like ulcers) who is going to surgical debride the wound? It will either go to general surgery or ortho for an amputation; maybe that is why she has to use honey b/c she doesn't have the options that a pod would have to treat it.
     
  5. iwilldlvr

    iwilldlvr not listening
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    I thought it was kind of weird that the doctor wasn't a podiatrist. The gp MD/DOs in my area don't do that kind of care. They would rather send to a podiatrist, as they should. It will be interesting to see what the research concludes.
     
  6. Catayst

    Catayst Hardest working man in toe business
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    I take it this would be more medically acceptable than the good ol "just pee on your feet" athletes foot treatment?
     
  7. AlleghenyPOD

    AlleghenyPOD 1st Year MD-bound
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    Very interesting article find indeed. I actually am pleased to see that the medical community as well as the general public is exposed to the accuracy and credibility of herbalic/alternative medicine in this 'prescription-saturated' society we live in.

    There is a reason for this: the antibacterial activity and the acidity of honey; as a means to treat ailments. As for its antimicrobial use, honey is composed of a strong mixture of fructose and glucose (around 84%) and water content is about ~15% of the weight and due to the strong interaction between the sugar and water elements; it leaves minimal growth for bacteria. And considering the 'free' water activity in standard honey is about 0.562 to 0.62 and considering bacterial growth depends on free water, bacterial growth are inhibitted by aw .5 to .6. However there are some bacteria that have been able to grow, but it depends on the species of bacteria. Another aspect of the success of honey is due to its acidic level; standard undiluted honey has a pH value of about ~3 and considering the minimal pH environment of some pathogens are: Escherichia coli, 4.3; Salmonella sp., 4.0; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 4.4; Streptococcus pyogenes, 4.5, that means that growth of the said pathogen in indiluted honey of a low pH will be nullified.

    So next time when someone tells you to stop eating honey, just tell them "not unless you want bacterial growth, you ungrateful S.O.B" LOL :laugh:. Okay, maybe you can emit the 'SOB' part. =P
     
  8. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest
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    I don't doubt it works. My concern is not seeking treatment. Honey cannot debride the fibrotic tissue that will prevent an ulcer from healing.
     
  9. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member
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    Honey was used by the ancient egyptians (I think). They put it on wounds and then let it dry. When you pull it off it debrides just like a wet to dry would.

    I also do not doubt that honey works but it even said in the article that it was used after everything else failed. It will be interesting to see what they use as a control and what other methods they compare honey to and if they offload the ulcers?
     
  10. AlleghenyPOD

    AlleghenyPOD 1st Year MD-bound
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    Of course. There is nothing compared to proper medical care for anything, however I am merely pointing out how I am satisfied in knowing that age-old home remedies such as the use of honey, garlic, ginger etc and other herbalic types are being legitimized medically (at least dissecting in the reasons for its success).

    On that note, one good thing to take into consideration is 'eating more' garlic. LOL.Not only is it a good anti-coagulant and effective in containing high cholesterol, from my studies this year in lab, it is proven of garlic's profficiency as an inhibitor of bacerial growth.

    One of those :Did You know: lol.

    I guess the old saying "eat garlic cuz it keeps the vampires away" holds some kind of legitimacy (not that im condoning believing in such unfounded superstition) but based on the fact that garlic prevents bacterial(pathogenic) growth..well ..you can symbolize the vampire as bacteria..and there you go.
     
  11. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest
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    It also has a proven proficiency to inhibit mating.
     
  12. AlleghenyPOD

    AlleghenyPOD 1st Year MD-bound
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    LOL...didnt even think about that. But yes..that too. :laugh:
     
  13. AlleghenyPOD

    AlleghenyPOD 1st Year MD-bound
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    Poop? Um no. It has been proven that honey has effective antibacteriaL capability as I explained in prior posts or if you want to check it out go to: jstor.com and search articles on it. I think the use of alternative medical care should be supported; per se eastern medicine and thet use of age old practices such as acupuncture and its derivatives. Second, it is my opinion and the view point and many have similar view points; if you dont like my view then dont read it or dont read any of our forums.

    And I stand with my initial statement that our society is too inundated with prescription drugs.
     
  14. Catayst

    Catayst Hardest working man in toe business
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    You're both right as honey is antibacterial but not to the extent as something like triple antibiotic. Allopathic medicine is undoubtly effective but remember that every drug has a side effect. Natural medicines are worth looking into because often that side effect negates what good is done by the drug, if only for a small portion of the population. It can't hurt to have an alternate treatment for people allergic to the synthetic meds.
     
  15. AlleghenyPOD

    AlleghenyPOD 1st Year MD-bound
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    Good point, cat. As what robin williams said in Patch Adams, "I concur!"
     
  16. Dr. Gangrene

    Dr. Gangrene AZPOD 2011
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    Agreed. Alternatives are nice, and medications are often made from natural products (i.e. opium), but it is a worry that people will just read things on the internet and then treat themselves (like my sister in law :laugh: (she is a tree hugger):laugh:
     
  17. Dr. Gangrene

    Dr. Gangrene AZPOD 2011
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    Don't forget dracula :laugh: :laugh:
     
  18. AlleghenyPOD

    AlleghenyPOD 1st Year MD-bound
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    Excuse me?? Wiley Chinese? Being someone who has Chinese in the background, I find that not only racist, but filled with ignorance on the subject matter. The ancient confucian physicians actually had an established medical system thousands of years even before the concept of hygenics was generally accepted in Europe.

    Just to clear your own ignorance on the matter (I apologize for the thread starter, but I will get back to the said subject matter after this post.)

    +++
    http://chinese-school.netfirms.com/Chinese-medicine.html

    READ MORE ABOUT IT. Its over 4,000 year old.
    http://www.cmjournal.org/
     
  19. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest
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    Another major concern I have about honey is the presence of spore forming bacteria (which is a majority of the bacteria that grows in honey). I don't care about botulism or anthrax, what I'm worried about is Clostridium perfringens which causes myofascial necrosis aka gas gengrene. A fast moving gas forming necrosis, that is a major medical emergency. This would not be good in a diabetic foot.
     

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