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obligated to serve God...
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I see that most are saying that retail pharmDs stand the entire shift. What about hospital pharmDs? Are they standing all day, I mean since they are doing more "behind the scene" things.
 

Rxbound

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Sep 14, 2005
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The ones I work with spend most of their day at the computer, seated, entering orders...occasionally they leave the pharmacy, but not often.
 

Sosumi

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The staff pharmacists at my hospital spend most of their time sitting to enter orders and answer the phone. They only get up to check Pyxis fills, cart fills, crash carts, anesthesia trays, and IVs, and to do stat orders and controlled substance fills. They also have to go up to the floors to respond to Code Blues or to do aminoglycoside dosing. They also get 45 minutes have an uninterrupted lunch break.

As for the clinical pharmacists, it depends on what their duty is (medication safety, transitional care, critical care, etc.).
 
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konkan

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Sep 11, 2005
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What is code blue?


Sosumi said:
The staff pharmacists at my hospital spend most of their time sitting to enter orders and answer the phone. They only get up to check Pyxis fills, cart fills, crash carts, anesthesia trays, and IVs, and to do stat orders and controlled substance fills. They also have to go up to the floors to respond to Code Blues or to do aminoglycoside dosing. They also get 45 minutes have an uninterrupted lunch break.

As for the clinical pharmacists, it depends on what their duty is (medication safety, transitional care, critical care, etc.).
 

LBS615

LBS615
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konkan said:
What is code blue?

A code blue is a medical emergency that occurs in the hospital, ie a heart attack or respiratory failure.

A code black at my hospital was a bomb threat.

A code pink was a child emergency.

A code red was a fire.

There were a lot of codes and we had them all conveniently listed on the back of our ID cards.
 

Requiem

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Jul 22, 2004
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There are two main types:

Dispensary pharmacists
Clinical pharmacists.

The latter does rounding with the 'inter-disciplinary healthcare team' to assess and review patients' charts, makes recommendations on therapeutic action, colloborates with Nurse Pracitioners/Physicians as a whole.

Dispensary pharmacists, are just that. You have little patient contact, opposed to full-on patient contact in regards to clinical.
 

sdn1977

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Here in CA most all hospital pharmacists serve both functions - dispensing and clinical. Now....the dispensing is checking the stat dose the tech has prepared (or heaven forbid - checking pyxis!!!) - not actually dispensing. But...the clinical work usually requires standing/walking. You have to go to where the patient is - and that is not the pharmacy. So...you walk to whatever unit the patient is on - look at the chart, speak to the nurse,patient or family, do your calculations, write the order, etc..So, yes you are on your feet - but...so what? So is the MD, the respiratory tech, the nurse - you don't notice it after awhile. IMO, the very WORST job in hospital pharmacy is sitting and doing anything - checking orders, inputing orders in the computer, etc....I feel I am on a very short tether - either to the phone or the computer!
 
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