Aug 21, 2017
4
2
In the midst of searching for Hospitalist jobs.

What is a good resource for the type of questions I should be asking to recruiters and employers?
Anyone have recommendations for physician contract lawyers?
What usually happens on interview day?
How important is it to bring the spouse?

Any other info is well appreciated.
 

InvestingDoc

2+ Year Member
Jul 5, 2016
152
231
Status
Attending Physician
Ask those who graduated a year above you for what they did for their job search. This will give you the most accurate look into your local market. Otherwise, I wrote an article here about physician employment contracts that has pretty much everything you need for your first job as a hospitalist.

A lawyer will read you the contract to ensure that you understand how the contract can screw you or benefit you potentially. They can also help guide you if you want on what to negotiate for. I used a lawyer and I was a bit frustrated. I spent $600 for someone to read me a contract that I already had a good grasp on. I also wasted my money since my group is so large that they basically refused to negotiate on any terms in the contract. Wait till you get a contract in hand before considering a lawyer. Then, if you have any questions you can easily find one. Most places will give you 2 to 4 weeks to make a decision.

Interview day for me was 1 hour meeting with CEO, CMO and other people with the group. We talked about contracts, work day, whats expected and such. Then they allowed me to tour the hospital. Super chill but I still dressed up in a suit. Hospitalist have such high turnover that its very very easy to get a job. Every place I interviewed at, I was offered a job.

The group paid for travel and hotel.

Bring your spouse if you would like to the city where you interview but not the actual interview itself.
 

lulu09

7+ Year Member
May 1, 2010
188
150
I'm just starting the process now. I haven't interviewed in-person yet but had a lot of prelim phone calls setting up for in-person interviews in the next 2 months. BTW these are all academic hospitals and not locums or hospitalist groups.

From people who went through it last year:
-Lots of logistics issues - how many hospitalists are there, who are you on with, what kind of midlevel support is there, is CCM there, do you need to do lines...etc.
-What is the current situation like (e.g. are you filling in for someone who is leaving or are you being hired to replace moonlighters - sheds light on the current situation of the hospital

I suppose you can ask about the patient population, scope of the patient's disease...etc. but I'm not as interested since I'm going to do hospitalist for a short-term.

Our residency actually has a lawyer that can answer questions after receiving the contract, which is pretty cool I suppose but yes, I've heard over and over again if you don't understand something in the contract, you need to have a lawyer review it. I think 50/50 of the third years who graduated who are working at hospitalists this year used the services of the lawyer.
 

rokshana

Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 20, 2004
4,085
4,005
Status
Attending Physician
I'm just starting the process now. I haven't interviewed in-person yet but had a lot of prelim phone calls setting up for in-person interviews in the next 2 months. BTW these are all academic hospitals and not locums or hospitalist groups.

From people who went through it last year:
-Lots of logistics issues - how many hospitalists are there, who are you on with, what kind of midlevel support is there, is CCM there, do you need to do lines...etc.
-What is the current situation like (e.g. are you filling in for someone who is leaving or are you being hired to replace moonlighters - sheds light on the current situation of the hospital

I suppose you can ask about the patient population, scope of the patient's disease...etc. but I'm not as interested since I'm going to do hospitalist for a short-term.

Our residency actually has a lawyer that can answer questions after receiving the contract, which is pretty cool I suppose but yes, I've heard over and over again if you don't understand something in the contract, you need to have a lawyer review it. I think 50/50 of the third years who graduated who are working at hospitalists this year used the services of the lawyer.
Even if you think you understand your contract, you should have a lawyer who specializes in health care contracts look over the contract.
 
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