robf

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...from saliva to an open wound? say someone with hep c spit into your open wound or licked a needle (no blood) and then you stuck yourself?
 

crazy_sherm

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If I recall, HIV conversion after a needlestick from a known infected patient is ~0.3%. HCV is closer to ~10%. Relatively rare, but why take the chance. Practice safe protocols and don't stick yourself.
 
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aphistis

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robf said:
...from saliva to an open wound? say someone with hep c spit into your open wound or licked a needle (no blood) and then you stuck yourself?
...huh? Are you wanting to try it out on yourself or something?

As I understand it, salivary transmission of HIV & HCV is more like "theoretically possible under perfect circumstances" than something you really have to worry about.

Either way, I recommend not sticking yourself with needles other people have licked, and not allowing other folks to spit in your open wounds. :p
 

toofache32

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The risk of HIV transmission is 0.3%, and for Hep C it's 1.8%.

Evanoff B, Kim L, Mutha S, et al: Compliance with universal precautions among emergency department personnel caring for trauma patients. Ann Emerg Med 33:106-165, 1999.

Also, open-bore instruments (needles) carry a higher risk than suture needles, etc. I will take an HIV patient any day over a Hep C patient.
 

rambo2006

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Licking a needle, Yummmmmmmm
 

dexadental

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How much does the risk decrease given one has had the three doses of the hep vaccine administered? Does the hep vaccine apply to A, B, and C?
 

JRogoff

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dexadental said:
How much does the risk decrease given one has had the three doses of the hep vaccine administered? Does the hep vaccine apply to A, B, and C?
Only to B, which also gives cross immunity to Hep D.
 

Dancing Doctor

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dexadental said:
How much does the risk decrease given one has had the three doses of the hep vaccine administered? Does the hep vaccine apply to A, B, and C?
I work at a biotech company on HBV. Here's some facts that they gave us:

Hepatitis B is the most common serious liver infection in the world. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) that attacks liver cells and can lead to liver failure, cirrhosis (scarring) or cancer of the liver. The virus is transmitted through contact with blood and bodily fluids that contain blood. Most people are able to fight off an hepatitis B infection and clear the virus from their blood. This may take up to six months. While the virus is present in their blood, infected people can pass the virus on to others. Approximately 5-10% of adults, 30-50% of children, and 90% of babies will not get rid of the virus and will develop chronic infection. Chronically infected people can pass the virus on to others and are at increased risk for liver problems later in life.

The hepatitis B virus is 100 times more infectious than the AIDS virus. Yet, hepatitis B can be prevented with a safe and effective vaccine. For the 400 million people worldwide who are chronically infected with hepatitis B the vaccine is of no use. However, there are promising new treatments for those who live with chronic hepatitis B. Hepatitis B is most efficiently transmitted through blood and infected bodily fluids. This can occur through direct blood-to-blood contact, unprotected sex, illicit drug use, and from an infected woman to her newborn during the delivery process.

Hepatitis B can be spread by
• unprotected sex
• sharing IV drug needles
• living in a household with an infected person
• an infected mother to her newborn child at birth
• sharing earrings, razors, or toothbrushes with an infected person
• unsterilized needles, including tattoo or piercing needles
• human bites
Hepatitis B is not spread by
• kissing on the cheek or lips
• coughing or sneezing
• casual contact such as hugging or holding hands
• eating food prepared by an infected individual
People are most at risk for hepatitis B if they
• are born to mothers who are infected with HBV
• live in close household contact with a chronically infected individual
• adopt a child from a country where HBV is prevalent
• have unprotected sex or have more than one sexual partner in a six month period
• have ever been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (STD)
• men who have sex with men
• share needles and syringes
• are health care provider or emergency responder with possible contact with bodily fluids
• are a patient on kidney dialysis
• live or work in an institutional setting, such as a prison or group home

Also, after a person has been exposed to HBV, appropriate treatment, given in an appropriate time frame, can effectively prevent infection. The mainstay of post exposure immunoprophylaxis is hepatitis B vaccine, but in some settings the addition of HBIG will provide some increase in protection. There is a separate vaccine for HAV. There is no vaccine for HCV.
 

Tarheel

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toofache32 said:
The risk of HIV transmission is 0.3%, and for Hep C it's 1.8%.

Evanoff B, Kim L, Mutha S, et al: Compliance with universal precautions among emergency department personnel caring for trauma patients. Ann Emerg Med 33:106-165, 1999.

Also, open-bore instruments (needles) carry a higher risk than suture needles, etc. I will take an HIV patient any day over a Hep C patient.
The larger the bore the greater the risk. (eq Anesthetic needles in dentistry carry a lower risk than IV needles.) It is also important to note that there is not a single documented case of patient to dental provider (Assistant, Hygienist, Dentist, etc...) transmission of HIV in the United States.
 
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MD2b20004

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Tarheel said:
The larger the bore the greater the risk. (eq Anesthetic needles in dentistry carry a lower risk than IV needles.) It is also important to note that there is not a single documented case of patient to dental provider (Assistant, Hygienist, Dentist, etc...) transmission of HIV in the United States.
Actually I heard of some, i forgot the exact article but yes it had occured before. Also you go to worry about protecting your eyes, you do not want to have blood squirt in your eyes when drilling. Maybe I am a germo-phob, I took an Advanced AIDs and Society Upper Division Elective in undergrad and also volunteered in an AIDS clinic for 1 year with a faculty member who was/is on President Bush's AIDs Advisery's Committee. I volunteered to help releave the stress or thought that there is soooooooooooooo much of a slim chance to get patient to doctor infections (any doctor DMD,DDS, DPM, etc...). Little did i find out the darn experience scared me sh*tless and did opposite of what i took the elective for. LoL, I remember having to take Medical Orientation Classes during beginning of Med School about abusing drugs/alcohol, I guess there is such a figure that 40% of most doctors did or will abuse either or , or both. I also loved how they showed us a True Story Video of a Pedo. Surgeon Resident just about to finish her residency, was off duty and was on her way down the hospital halls to her car. She noticed a baby chocking and gave the baby unprotected CPR out of instinct, and little did she know the baby was HIV+ through birth (if you have HIV or AIDs and get a kid, there is a high chance your kids will inherent the virus). All in all, the freakin resident went over 12 years to school and all these loans and before even practicing and making the big bucks she get infected with HIV. Who would of thought? It is a baby? And it is human instinct and even more human instinct when your a physician to revive any patient just like it is for a cop to protect even off duty. Sad story, felt bad, then felt why the F*ck did the school show us the video to begin with, it turned out so they can "encourage us" to carry around those annoying CPR covers with us at all times.
 

Tarheel

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MD2b20004 said:
Actually I heard of some, i forgot the exact article but yes it had occured before. QUOTE]

Although there are six "possible" dental exposures according to the CDC even they admit that the Science behind this categorization "is not very hard". Five of the six patients admitted other high risk behaviors. The CDC (Center for Disease Control) did not categorize these encounters as probable, likely or documented because of lack of evidence to substatiate these claims. Included below are excerpts from a review article in Dental World that covers each of the six possible cases.


March/April • 2004 Dental world page 3
An Evidence-Based Study on the AIDS Epidemic in Dentistry
by E. J. Neiburger, DDS, Director, Center for Dental AIDS Research

“In 1999, the CDC changed the total number, removing one case; thus reporting a new total of 6 “possible” cases of dental worker occupational exposure… Of the seven (six) dentists classified as “possible” occupational HIV/AIDS transmission, three were general practitioners, one a periodontist, one a pedodontist and two were dental students. Five had AIDS; two were HIV positive but had no symptoms. Three dentists were mentally impaired. The seven preformed 22,134 procedures on 6,740 patients with no HIV/AIDS being transferred to or from the operators (DNA studies)…
This report states that “almost” all the possible cases of DWs seroconverting had high-risk behavior, a proven source of HIV/AIDS infection unrelated to dentistry. The first dentist would not admit high-risk behavior. There were no examples of individuals who did not have this probable cause of infection. When asked how accurate this data was in supporting the “possible” designation, one CDC official stated, “The scientific evidence is not very ‘hard.’” There are no documented cases of (dental)occupational HIV/AIDS transmission. There are no “probable” cases and the six dentists classified in the “possible” designation appear arbitrary, lacking any scientific veracity….
Conclusion

So where do we stand on the potential of dental workers (dentists, assistants, etc.) of acquiring HIV/AIDS professionally? AIDS/HIV seroconversion rates of dentists have been studied for over 20 years. There is no dependable scientific evidence to substantiate that dental workers are or have been in ANY danger. The historical odds of a dental worker acquiring HIV/AIDS occupationally are zero. This is supported by the facts that in billions of dental patient contacts there have never been any documented cases of occupational HIV/AIDS infection in dentistry anywhere in the world since AIDS was discovered. It appears that the CDC’s proposed seven (six) possible cases of dental worker infection are based on scant, unscientific, poorly substantiated and unreliable/data. “
 

Dion

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Do the viruses (from STDS such as HIV) live in the saliva?
 

crazy_sherm

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Dion said:
Do the viruses (from STDS such as HIV) live in the saliva?
Herpes - yes when there are open lesions
HIV - not in any amount that can result in transmission
HBV/HVC - no

Almost all other STDs are bacterial.
 

MALOKINMARTIN

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MD2b20004 said:
Actually I heard of some, i forgot the exact article but yes it had occured before.
Yeah, my sisters-cousins-brothers-maid tolded me so...

MD2b20004 said:
a faculty member who was/is on President Bush's AIDs Advisery's Committee.
Is this supposed to impress?
 

ItsGavinC

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crazy_sherm said:
Herpes - yes when there are open lesions
HIV - not in any amount that can result in transmission
HBV/HVC - no

Almost all other STDs are bacterial.
Which is what really answers the OP's question. Others have posted transmission rates, but those are rates in general from infected patients. The OP is wondering what the rates are upon contamination with saliva itself, in which case the rates are 0%.
 

wireless_doc

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It's a little off, but also related. Which of the three heps is the mildest? One card says A, another says C. Thanks.
 
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robf

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Which is what really answers the OP's question. Others have posted transmission rates, but those are rates in general from infected patients. The OP is wondering what the rates are upon contamination with saliva itself, in which case the rates are 0%.
I’m the OP and basically what happened was that this patient I have who has Hep C and HIV, I was doing a denture wax try-in and I had just taken the denture out of his mouth (covered with saliva) and was trimming it with a blade when I pricked my thumb. It was good enough to draw a little blood, but I don’t think the tip of the blade (where I pricked myself) ever contacted saliva (at least I don’t think) and people at school said I probably shouldn’t worry, but I just wanted to hear what people here thought.
 
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