cmF

7+ Year Member
Oct 21, 2010
260
14
AZ
Status
Dental Student
I'm a pre-dent looking to improve, nay, guarantee entrance to dental school. I'm very borderline at the moment with a 3.4 Science and Overall GPA with a strong upwards trend line (3.7ish the last couple years of upper division classes). Additionally, I have scores in the 90th percentile range in the DAT but a single 40th percentile in the math section. o_O

Once again, I'm very borderline and if I'm lucky, I might get acceptance to a dental school. If I'm not accepted, I don't want to waste a year waiting for the next cycle. I want to do a masters program because I think it'll show that I'm dedicated to the field. Additionally, I could boost that 3.4 GPA... or will I? Every SDN story I hear about master's goes something like this "I got a 2.7 undergrad and 4.0 in masters." Did those students just really turn it around and kick ass in the masters program? Or is the masters program a bit easier than undergraduate classes? Or is the curve different? Or what?

The point being, I tried damn hard to get a 3.4 cumulative GPA and nearly killed myself (figuratively) achieving a 3.7 those last semesters. I don't want to enroll in a masters program and be overwhelmed with the difficulty, and actually lower my cumulative GPA. I'm not saying I'll only do a master's if it's a piece of cake. I'm willing to work hard and often twice as much as the average student in the class. I could pull A's in undergrad, but just barely. Should I do a masters program given my borderline circumstances? Thanks!
 
Apr 22, 2013
142
56
I'm a pre-dent looking to improve, nay, guarantee entrance to dental school. I'm very borderline at the moment with a 3.4 Science and Overall GPA with a strong upwards trend line (3.7ish the last couple years of upper division classes). Additionally, I have scores in the 90th percentile range in the DAT but a single 40th percentile in the math section. o_O

Once again, I'm very borderline and if I'm lucky, I might get acceptance to a dental school. If I'm not accepted, I don't want to waste a year waiting for the next cycle. I want to do a masters program because I think it'll show that I'm dedicated to the field. Additionally, I could boost that 3.4 GPA... or will I? Every SDN story I hear about master's goes something like this "I got a 2.7 undergrad and 4.0 in masters." Did those students just really turn it around and kick ass in the masters program? Or is the masters program a bit easier than undergraduate classes? Or is the curve different? Or what?

The point being, I tried damn hard to get a 3.4 cumulative GPA and nearly killed myself (figuratively) achieving a 3.7 those last semesters. I don't want to enroll in a masters program and be overwhelmed with the difficulty, and actually lower my cumulative GPA. I'm not saying I'll only do a master's if it's a piece of cake. I'm willing to work hard and often twice as much as the average student in the class. I could pull A's in undergrad, but just barely. Should I do a masters program given my borderline circumstances? Thanks!
I am in a similar position as you, but I am applying to medical school after my first year in the MPH program. From what I hear, graduate school is easier because the curve is more generous and it is not about grades, rather, it is about developing the skills necessary to achieve your career goals and interests. I have also heard that it is like any other graduate or professional program. Once you are in, they expect you to do the work and they will try as much as possible to keep you in the program. My friend told me that if I apply the same work ethic as I did in my premedical coursework that I should do well in the masters program, but who knows. This is all speculation.
 
Last edited:
Mar 5, 2012
42
2
Status
Other Health Professions Student
I was pre med for my UG and I do find it possibly more difficult than my current MPH. But the thing is, if you go on and pursue a Master's it should be something you're interested in so you should do well. My current grad GPA is 3.8 in environmental health; no curving at all (93 or sometimes 95% is an A, 90% A-, etc.)
Whereas my UG was 3.017 (I have to admit though, in hindsight, I could've done a lot better) For ex. I took comparative vertebrate anatomy and got a D as well as the absolute lowest grade on the midterm (sub 50%); retook the following year with the same professor, same material and got a 97%.

So in short, grad GPAs are higher/inflated due to
1) most programs require you to keep a 3.0 to stay in and
2) you enjoy learning more/are more mature and responsible; at least in my case.
 
Feb 17, 2013
203
25
Status
One thing I would do is talk to people in admissions at dental schools and see what they think about the benefit of getting an MPH and doing well in it.
 
Apr 10, 2013
54
23
Status
What's the point of getting an MPH if your end goal is medical or dental school? Is it really worth the $50k/$100k expense depending on the length of the program, and all the time and effort you put in for the degree so that you get an entry on your resume?

How does an MPH help you if your career goal is to become a physician or a dentist? what else can you do, such as volunteering or getting a job, to make up for whatever weakness you have on your profile so that you have a better chance getting into medical or dental school? These are the questions you should be asking yourself before jumping into an MPH program that ended up being an extra title after your name with no actual use.

Just my 2 cents.
 
Apr 22, 2013
142
56
What's the point of getting an MPH if your end goal is medical or dental school? Is it really worth the $50k/$100k expense depending on the length of the program, and all the time and effort you put in for the degree so that you get an entry on your resume?

How does an MPH help you if your career goal is to become a physician or a dentist? what else can you do, such as volunteering or getting a job, to make up for whatever weakness you have on your profile so that you have a better chance getting into medical or dental school? These are the questions you should be asking yourself before jumping into an MPH program that ended up being an extra title after your name with no actual use.

Just my 2 cents.
I think that there are many uses for an MPH (e.g. dental public health, epidemiology, etc). Everything depends on your career goals. For example, I am interested in health disparities research among minorities, specifically, African Americans and why they have an increased prevalence of chronic disease compared to majority populations. I am also interested in global health. I applied extremely early with pretty good stats because I was told that I would receive some level of tuition support in the form of scholarships. At the school that I will be attending for my MPH (my alma mater), I have interviewed to be an RA for free room and board, and I am sure that I will receive some level of tuition support. I can also apply for TA positions because I know many of the professors that teach certain courses at the undergraduate level. I think that applying for a masters depends on your career goals and interests, as well as your stats.

But then again, the thread starter did not list his/her interests in his/her post.
 
Apr 10, 2013
54
23
Status
I think that there are many uses for an MPH (e.g. dental public health, epidemiology, etc). Everything depends on your career goals. For example, I am interested in health disparities research among minorities, specifically, African Americans and why they have an increased prevalence of chronic disease compared to majority populations. I am also interested in global health. I applied extremely early with pretty good stats because I was told that I would receive some level of tuition support in the form of scholarships. At the school that I will be attending for my MPH (my alma mater), I have interviewed to be an RA for free room and board, and I am sure that I will receive some level of tuition support. I can also apply for TA positions because I know many of the professors that teach certain courses at the undergraduate level. I think that applying for a masters depends on your career goals and interests, as well as your stats.

But then again, the thread starter did not list his/her interests in his/her post.
That's exactly my point. Know exactly what your interests and career goals are before jumping into a master's program. For someone like NeurosciTMS who knows that an MPH will be helpful in his/her later career, then by all means go ahead and apply. But I've seen many students, especially those fresh out of undergraduate, are applying just because they think an MPH degree would help increase their odds of getting into med or dental school.
 
OP
cmF

cmF

7+ Year Member
Oct 21, 2010
260
14
AZ
Status
Dental Student
That's exactly my point. Know exactly what your interests and career goals are before jumping into a master's program. For someone like NeurosciTMS who knows that an MPH will be helpful in his/her later career, then by all means go ahead and apply. But I've seen many students, especially those fresh out of undergraduate, are applying just because they think an MPH degree would help increase their odds of getting into med or dental school.
Thanks, I realize this is actually posted in the wrong forum. It should be in the SMP forum for things like masters in biomedical sciences.