how do i write a letter of intent

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bannie22

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overasked yeah. but u guys are all so helpful ill get better opinions this way rather than searching old threads:D

i like a school. very much.
shud i write a letter of intent now?
probably yes.

what goes into there?
any specific pointers?
shud i include an update of recent activities?
how long shud the letter be?
snail or email?
can i do one email and also one snail just to make sure it gets there asap?

who do i address it to? do i talk abt the ppl i met? do i talk abt the curicullum? what do i talk about?

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i like a school. very much.
shud i write a letter of intent now?
probably yes.

Keep it simple. Be sure to use red ink on spiral notebook paper (red is the color of love). The exclaimation point (!) after the Yes option is particularly important, but don't forget to include "Maybe" in case the target isn't ready to commit. And remember, use check BOXES -- don't just draw a line or else they might not know what to do:

51430807.jpg


I'm sorry, it was the first thing that came to mind. I've got nothin'. Good luck.
 
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The above advice is very good, although you should definitely NOT forget to sign your name with a heart or smiley face. Preferably both, if you want to show that you are really interested.
 
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I think dotting the "I"s with little hearts would be a nice touch too.

But seriously:

The letter should not exceed one page. I'm presuming the letter is meant for the school you most recently interviewed at. I would address it to a person who interviewed you IF they are on the adcomm (referring to something in the letter that will help them recall who you are). Otherwise, address it to the Admissions Committee. I feel a snail-mail letter is more formal, and thus preferred. Don't do a simultaneous e-mail.

Start with expressing appreciation for the honor of your recent interview.

Say you want them to be aware of updates pertinent to your application in case it may help them make a decision on your file. Give your fall GPA, perhaps mentioning some classes relevant to med school. Tell them any newly begun activities and any ongoing activity since you submitted (only the important stuff).

Close with why their school is perfect for you, trying to mesh with the school's mission statement. Say you look forward to hearing from them in the future. If you want it to be a Letter of Intent (not a Letter of Interest) you would add that if accepted you will withdraw your other applications.

This latter statement is problematic as you are essentially telling them they don't need to offer you financial aid as you'll go there anyway. If you would like a scholarship, grant, or waiver of tuition in some form, think long and hard about whether you really want to make such a promise.

Then sign your name, bannie, putting some curliques around the "B". (J/K)
 
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I think dotting the "I"s with little hearts would be a nice touch too.

But seriously:

The letter should not exceed one page. I'm presuming the letter is meant for the school you most recently interviewed at. I would address it to a person who interviewed you IF they are on the adcomm (referring to something in the letter that will help them recall who you are). Otherwise, address it to the Admissions Committee. I feel a snail-mail letter is more formal, and thus preferred. Don't do a simultaneous e-mail.

Start with expressing appreciation for the honor of your recent interview.

Say you want them to be aware of updates pertinent to your application in case it may help them make a decision on your file. Give your fall GPA, perhaps mentioning some classes relevant to med school. Tell them any newly begun activities and any ongoing activity since you submitted (only the important stuff).

Close with why their school is perfect for you, trying to mesh with the school's mission statement. Say you look forward to hearing from them in the future. If you want it to be a Letter of Intent (not a Letter of Interest) you would add that if accepted you will withdraw your other applications.

This latter statement is problematic as you are essentially telling them they don't need to offer you financial aid as you'll go there anyway. If you would like a scholarship, grant, or waiver of tuition in some form, think long and hard about whether you really want to make such a promise.

Then sign your name, bannie, putting some curliques around the "B". (J/K)

Nicely done....:thumbup:
 
heh. thanks guys, you guys are amazing. even finding the link for me.

i have written the letter and sent it off. its now in cinnanti... fly my letter. fly there fasttttt
 
firstly, spelling is important. make sure you know exactly how to spell "should" if you were to use that word. ;)

joking aside, i think that now is not the time to send a letter of intent. correct me if i am wrong, but january is still pretty early to send such a letter. i say wait until march, when the decisions come out. i have heard that letter of intent will not be weighed as much before then because it will seem like a desperate applicant who is sending such a letter to a few (or many?) schools in the hopes of an acceptance. whereas after march, when applicants receive all notifications of acceptance, rejection, and wait list, it will make more sense that the applicant knows for sure that he or she will definitely attend a specific school pending acceptance. a letter of interest, however, is appropriate right now (post interview).
 
firstly, spelling is important. make sure you know exactly how to spell "should" if you were to use that word. ;)

joking aside, i think that now is not the time to send a letter of intent. correct me if i am wrong, but january is still pretty early to send such a letter. i say wait until march, when the decisions come out. i have heard that letter of intent will not be weighed as much before then because it will seem like a desperate applicant who is sending such a letter to a few (or many?) schools in the hopes of an acceptance. whereas after march, when applicants receive all notifications of acceptance, rejection, and wait list, it will make more sense that the applicant knows for sure that he or she will definitely attend a specific school pending acceptance. a letter of interest, however, is appropriate right now (post interview).


i know this is an old thread...but is this true?
 
i know this is an old thread...but is this true?
Note that the poster is referring to a Letter of Intent, which is essentially a promise that you will attend there if accepted, which is completely different from a Letter of Interest. It would only be appropriate to send such a letter to your top-choice school. And even then, give consideration to the drawback I mentioned above:
This latter statement is problematic as you are essentially telling them they don't need to offer you financial aid as you'll go there anyway. If you would like a scholarship, grant, or waiver of tuition in some form, think long and hard about whether you really want to make such a promise.
 
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