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How does one get boarded?

Discussion in 'Pre-Veterinary' started by VeganChick, Dec 13, 2008.

  1. VeganChick

    VeganChick Tufts University V'13
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    Out of curiosity, what is the process to get boarded? The only thing I know is that the exam is given once a year and it is very hard and very stressful.
     
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  3. alliecat44

    alliecat44 KSU CVM Class of '11
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    What specialty are you referring to?
     
  4. sofficat

    sofficat AU CVM c/o 11
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    If you just mean to become a licensed vet there are usually two things you need to do (well- three because you need to graduate from vet school :))-

    1) take your state boards for where you plan to practice or where you think you might practice in the future, if those states even require it. Some of those exams are a joke... for AL- you get a 30 page packet on laws and such and the exam is based on that... or Kentucky is a take home exam

    2) Pass the NAVLE (national boards). They are offered twice a year and I just heard that they have limited retakes to 2 (so you get 3 chances total). But seriously, if you can pass vet school there is no reason you can't pass boards (esp by chance number 3). One of my friends just took it and said it wasn't that bad. Pretty straight forward. All mult choice, pictures are now included on the exam. I am preparing for it little by little by taking advantage of this website http://zukureview.com/viewquestionoftheday.php I answer the question of the day and look at archive questions if I have time or want to procrastinate (like what I am doing now!).

    Hope that helps!
     
  5. Emio

    Emio Fudge Bane
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    sofficat, i've heard you can have them to email you a question a day for free. but whenever i go to that site to subscribe, they ask me for hundreds of dollars. do you know what the deal is?

    to the OP: what sofficat said.
     
  6. FlyOnTheWall

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    “Boarded” implies certification in a specialty beyond simply being “licensed” to practice veterinary medicine (having passed the national boards during your senior year and then individual exams in states you want to practice).

    To be “Board Certified” in a clinical specialty (like internal medicine, surgery, emergency/critical care, ophthalmology etc.) a graduate veterinary usually must complete a rotating internship (1 year) and a focused residency (2-3 years). Each has it’s own certifying exam process. Some (like internal medicine) have 2 exams usually taken a year apart while others (like surgery) have just one exam. Most also require some sort of publication.
     
  7. VeganChick

    VeganChick Tufts University V'13
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    Thanks FotW - that is what I was referring to.:)
     
  8. pressmom

    pressmom Third year!
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    Actually it's five takes.

    http://www.nbvme.org/?id=71

    And I think the OP meant specialist.
     
  9. projekt

    projekt UGA c/o 2012
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    If you want to see what sorts of residencies exist, check out http://www.virmp.org

    There are other residencies as well that are not on the list. Generally, you do a rotating internship that covers a lot of specialties and then apply for the residency.

    Residencies are extremely competitive so it's good to enhance your chances at getting them. The quality of your internship program and your grades are important. Clinical evaluations (senior year, internship) are important. Letters of reference are important. Research in the field you're interested in is often helpful to make you stand out. Doing externships at the schools that have residencies can also make you stand out.

    Of course, getting the DVM is the first part :)
     
  10. EqSci

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    I also wanted to add that an internship and a residency is the usual route, but it's not the ONLY route. The vet I worked with this summer earned is board certified and earned it while practicing in his own private practice. He did have to visit hospitals to get the required caseloads, but as far as I know he never did the full blown residency or internship.
     
  11. Emio

    Emio Fudge Bane
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    while you can 'get away with' not doing an internship before a residency, and simply working in practice for several years, i don't think you can get out of doing a 'full blown residency.' i thought you could only be qualified if you entered an approved residency program at an approved facility/clinic.

    maybe rules have changed since he did it, or maybe i misunderstood what you meant. or maybe i'm just wrong, ha.
     
  12. projekt

    projekt UGA c/o 2012
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    I forgot to mention the difference between board-certified specialists and board-certified practitioners. Specialists, like surgeons, opthalmologists, and the like, finished a residency and are diplomates of organizations with "College" in their name, like ACVS. Specialty practitioners get certified by the ABVP. The requirements for ABVP are either a residency or 5 years of full time clinical practice, plus an examination that you have to retake every 10 years.
     
  13. VeganChick

    VeganChick Tufts University V'13
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    Cool website, thanks!
     
  14. runnerDC

    runnerDC Tufts - class of 2011
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    Yes, there are several specialties which have "alternate route" residency paths, rather than just the traditional 3 year residency program. The American College of Veterinary Nutrition is one that I know of that offers this (to be board-cert in nutrition). I'm sure a browse of the other various Colleges' websites would outline whether or not other specialties also offer an alternate route.
    Note that alt routes would not show up on the VIRMP match program website.


     
  15. david594

    david594 The-OSU CVM c/o 2013
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    Theriogenology is the same way with an alternative path. You end up with the same Diplomate ACT at the end of your name as the ones who completed a formal residency.
     
  16. Emio

    Emio Fudge Bane
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    how is that regulated? i couldn't get a GP job and palpate mares every winter, do a couple AIs and ETs for a few years, and get boarded, could i?
     
  17. FlyOnTheWall

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    No,

    Each specialty group has a pretty defined list of things you need to do to have your credentials accepted before they let you take a certifying exam. The alternate pathway is almost always longer (and harder) than a traditional 3 year residency with immersion in a specialty.
     
  18. Emio

    Emio Fudge Bane
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    ah, thank you. it was looking simpler and easier there for a minute.
     
  19. alliecat44

    alliecat44 KSU CVM Class of '11
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  20. VAgirl

    VAgirl UC Davis SVM c/o 2012
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    I believe ACVPM (veterinary preventive medicine) also does not require a residency. I worked with a bunch of Air Force vets this past year and one of them was just sitting her board exam for ACVPM when I was getting ready to leave. (And from scanning the website, I see that she passed and is now a Diplomate I guess they call it. Yay for her!)
     
  21. Emio

    Emio Fudge Bane
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