Nov 21, 2010
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The common wisdom on this board is to go on as many interviews as possible. However, if you look at past years, it seems that nearly everyone with 10+ interviews has matched (most in their top 5). This year seems to be more competitive (at least based on the number of people applying) and nobody wants to go unmatched due to overconfidence. However, as the costs of applying add up, is it worth the added time away from family and $$ to accept an offer if its not a program I am particularly excited about. Any thought/advice?
 

Gfunk6

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From the 2008 match data, 8 interviews seems to be the magic number to virtually assure a match. Personally, I turned down less than desirable interview offers when I hit 12 interviews. My rationale was that if I failed to match with 12 interviews, then it was due to a sociopathic personality on my part. Adding a few more programs would not help.
 

medgator

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From the 2008 match data, 8 interviews seems to be the magic number to virtually assure a match. Personally, I turned down less than desirable interview offers when I hit 12 interviews. My rationale was that if I failed to match with 12 interviews, then it was due to a sociopathic personality on my part. Adding a few more programs would not help.
ouch. Rad onc is a small field, and when you are interviewing with up to 35 other people for 1-2 spots, things can happen in the match algorithm that can allow you to end up unmatched after 12 interviews, sociopathic personality or not.
 

napoleondynamite

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I agree with medgator on this one. I have personally seen several non-sociopaths be victims of drive-by-shootings in the match, even with >10 interviews. You can be the most qualified applicant with a dynamic personality and still go unmatched in this field..my advice would be to go on as many interviews as feasible - an extra couple grand now beats a year off later - which would translate to many, many thousands of unearned cash as an attending for that one year later. If there was ever a time to go all-in, now is the time. But even with pocket aces, you can sometimes come out losing.
 

shogun0660

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+1 to what ND and medgator have said.
I know multiple people that were great to work with, smart, had at least some research, and 10+ interviews and did not match. I had 9 interviews my year and did not match. I'm biased, but I dont think I'm a complete sociopath.
There are some alternative loans out there specifically for residency interviews that aren't quite as bad as putting it all on your credit card. I used one from access group.
best of luck on interviews and in the match.
 

Knucklehead

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What if you're getting invitations from more competitive programs? Does that mean you need a shorter ROL?

What if you're couples matching?

Any regional variation in required number of ranks? (one would think its easier to match in the midwest for example)
 

medgator

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What if you're getting invitations from more competitive programs? Does that mean you need a shorter ROL?
If anything, wouldn't you want a longer one since they are more competitive?

You want to make sure you interview at a good mix of programs, in case you don't match a top tier one.
 

fiji128

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My thought is if you are spending between $150,000 to $300,000 on a MD degree (which basically only qualifies you to apply to residencies and not much else), the interview season is not the time to try and save a few bucks.
 
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My thought is if you are spending between $150,000 to $300,000 on a MD degree (which basically only qualifies you to apply to residencies and not much else), the interview season is not the time to try and save a few bucks.
While true, are you recommending going to 15-20 interviews, if lucky enough to get that many? Does it even help to go to that many? I'm not even close to that problem haha, but just wanted to see what you meant.