How much does a PharmD educated college professor earn?

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Does anyone know the salary of a PharmD professor both full time and adjunct? Is it more or less than retail?

After graduation I'd love to teach a couple classes part time at a community college.

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Ahem, you are already banned. However, what classes would a Pharm.D. teach at a community college?

I have been compensated well for the occasional lectures (though at a pharmacy school, not community college). Well over $100/hour. However, full-time faculty salary is below retail, I am pretty sure. You can add to that through research grants, but you need to be dedicated and work for years on someone else's research projects before being able to get good funding on your own.
 
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Ahem, you are already banned. However, what classes would a Pharm.D. teach at a community college?

I have been compensated well for the occasional lectures (though at a pharmacy school, not community college). Well over $100/hour. However, full-time faculty salary is below retail, I am pretty sure. You can add to that through research grants, but you need to be dedicated and work for years on someone else's research projects before being able to get good funding on your own.

How does one get the opportunity to give occasional lectures? Were you invited to give lectures, or was it a position you could actually apply for? I am really interested in teaching, but I'm not sure if I want to do it full-time or just on the side of my "real job". Did you give the lectures at your alma mater, or did you network at a different university?

I know the original troll was banned, but could a PharmD teach chemistry or biology at a CC? Or maybe even pharmacology for the nursing/allied health programs? I think that might be fun too, although I'd imagine the compensation would not be as nice as yours from the pharmacy school.
 
How does one get the opportunity to give occasional lectures? Were you invited to give lectures, or was it a position you could actually apply for? I am really interested in teaching, but I'm not sure if I want to do it full-time or just on the side of my "real job". Did you give the lectures at your alma mater, or did you network at a different university?

It's all networking. Based on my experience, and experience of other very part-time faculty, either your old friend who chose career in academia calls you and asks whether you would like to give a lecture on a certain topic where you have expertise - or you call the school and ask you favorite old professor whether they can use your skills and talents. It's a lot more common to lecture at your alma mater, but it's possible at any other school, if you have a contact there. I think this is one instance where contacts are everything - unless you are very, very prominent in a certain field, and a very much sought after speaker.

I know the original troll was banned, but could a PharmD teach chemistry or biology at a CC? Or maybe even pharmacology for the nursing/allied health programs? I think that might be fun too, although I'd imagine the compensation would not be as nice as yours from the pharmacy school.

I know virtually nothing about community colleges, and nothing at all about qualifications they require of their instructors. I know that a friend of mine used to teach biology part-time, but she has MS in biology... I personally don't think I would have wanted to teach a subject which is not my area of expertise.
 
Pharmacists commonly teach pharmacology to technicians in training and to nurses. You can also teach a variety of vocational classes directly designed to train technicians. I've heard these jobs are in high demand. Unfortunately the reason for this is that community colleges pay much less than any other job a pharmacist could get. The pay is also going to be substantially less than you'd make lecturing or being a professor at an actual pharmacy school.
 
Pharmacists commonly teach pharmacology to technicians in training and to nurses. You can also teach a variety of vocational classes directly designed to train technicians. I've heard these jobs are in high demand. Unfortunately the reason for this is that community colleges pay much less than any other job a pharmacist could get. The pay is also going to be substantially less than you'd make lecturing or being a professor at an actual pharmacy school.

It makes sense about the pay. Maybe I'd do it anyway, if I could fit it in along with another job.

For pharm school profs, do you know if there are many positions where you can just teach classes and maybe be a preceptor, but without the research component? I feel like I've heard of them, but I don't know how common they are. I'd like the lifestyle of a professor but I am not so keen on the idea of writing grants all the time.

Thanks for the info!
 
For pharm school profs, do you know if there are many positions where you can just teach classes and maybe be a preceptor, but without the research component? I feel like I've heard of them, but I don't know how common they are. I'd like the lifestyle of a professor but I am not so keen on the idea of writing grants all the time.

As a professor in pharmacy practice you don't have to do research if you don't want to, you can do clinical work in the university hospital or something like that - a few people who graduated a couple years ahead of me are now doing just that. Some of my former professors would have an arrangement where they would be working at the VA clinic (or hospital?) half the time, and lecture half the time, they were paid half-and-half too (one of them was my advisor, that's why I know). Being a preceptor generally requires no obligation other than being willing to do it (and being willing to put in time with the student, of course). Most schools pay a little bit extra, too. I tried to figure out what the process is for becoming a preceptor in New Jersey - some states require a special preceptor certification, and some don't - it's complicated.

I am doing some teaching as a part of my fellowship (mainly to figure out whether it is something I would enjoy or not), and I am currently in doubt. On one hand, I like being in front of the class and teaching them something they didn't know before, and knowing that my words will affect their future patients. On the other hand, it takes A LOT of time to prepare (probably, it took me some 8 hours to prepare one 60-minute lecture and write 5 exam questions for it). It is also not very rewarding when you feel like you are talking to a wall, when students are looking down/sleeping/talking/not paying attention/not answering questions. I am still unsure whether it is something I would enjoy doing full-time. I don't think so, though I am open to continuing occasional lecturing in the future. I would like to precept, I think, but I don't have the opportunity this year, at least.
 
As a professor in pharmacy practice you don't have to do research if you don't want to, you can do clinical work in the university hospital or something like that - a few people who graduated a couple years ahead of me are now doing just that. Some of my former professors would have an arrangement where they would be working at the VA clinic (or hospital?) half the time, and lecture half the time, they were paid half-and-half too (one of them was my advisor, that's why I know). Being a preceptor generally requires no obligation other than being willing to do it (and being willing to put in time with the student, of course). Most schools pay a little bit extra, too. I tried to figure out what the process is for becoming a preceptor in New Jersey - some states require a special preceptor certification, and some don't - it's complicated.

I am doing some teaching as a part of my fellowship (mainly to figure out whether it is something I would enjoy or not), and I am currently in doubt. On one hand, I like being in front of the class and teaching them something they didn't know before, and knowing that my words will affect their future patients. On the other hand, it takes A LOT of time to prepare (probably, it took me some 8 hours to prepare one 60-minute lecture and write 5 exam questions for it). It is also not very rewarding when you feel like you are talking to a wall, when students are looking down/sleeping/talking/not paying attention/not answering questions. I am still unsure whether it is something I would enjoy doing full-time. I don't think so, though I am open to continuing occasional lecturing in the future. I would like to precept, I think, but I don't have the opportunity this year, at least.

So if you don't do research, are you considered to be a "clinical professor"? Or is that not the same thing?

The half-and-half arrangement sounds great! I know that prep for teaching does take a lot of time though, so I guess the first time you taught a class it would probably take a lot of extra work. But after that, you just get to change things around, add stuff, etc. The basic framework can sort of stay the same I would think. Not sure really, as I've never been a prof myself! ;) I guess that's my observation from TAing for profs in undergrad.

I didn't know that teaching could be part of a fellowship! What other responsibilities do you have as a fellow? Are you given instruction on "how" to teach, or is it just meant to serve as practice?

I know what you mean about students who are uninterested, it does sort of make you feel bad about yourself! But I think if you can get over that and focus on the fact that you can help someone gain knowledge that they wouldn't otherwise have, it can be pretty rewarding. As you said, it's a tough job in some ways, and great in others. Anyway, good luck in deciding how much teaching to include in your future career. I'm sure you'll find the right balance. :)
 
So if you don't do research, are you considered to be a "clinical professor"? Or is that not the same thing?

The half-and-half arrangement sounds great! I know that prep for teaching does take a lot of time though, so I guess the first time you taught a class it would probably take a lot of extra work. But after that, you just get to change things around, add stuff, etc. The basic framework can sort of stay the same I would think. Not sure really, as I've never been a prof myself! ;) I guess that's my observation from TAing for profs in undergrad.

I didn't know that teaching could be part of a fellowship! What other responsibilities do you have as a fellow? Are you given instruction on "how" to teach, or is it just meant to serve as practice?

I know what you mean about students who are uninterested, it does sort of make you feel bad about yourself! But I think if you can get over that and focus on the fact that you can help someone gain knowledge that they wouldn't otherwise have, it can be pretty rewarding. As you said, it's a tough job in some ways, and great in others. Anyway, good luck in deciding how much teaching to include in your future career. I'm sure you'll find the right balance. :)[/




Doesn't one need a residency to teach at a pharmacy school at this point? Is the junior college gig adjunct only? Or would the pharmacy doctorate be equivalent to a chemistry masteres or docctorte in ths situation?
 
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