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How much statistics is required for medical research?

Discussion in 'Exam HQ' started by UrmiSinhaRay, Mar 4, 2019.

  1. UrmiSinhaRay

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    Will learning the Mann -Whitney test, ROC curve , Bland-Altman plot, Deming regression and Passing Bablok regression, control charts necessary for advanced research in medicine?
    Basically how much stats I need if I am wanting go into research medicine.
    I am a first Year MBBS student and I am looking for opportunities in medical research.
    Also suggest books with these chapters.
     
  2. PapaGuava

    PapaGuava All Things Must Pass
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    @QofQuimica may have some insight for your question!
     
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  3. QofQuimica

    QofQuimica Seriously, dude, I think you're overreacting....
    Staff Member Administrator Physician PhD Faculty Lifetime Donor Verified Expert Verified Account 10+ Year Member

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    I'm afraid I really can't answer that question without knowing more about what kind of research you're interested in doing. I would suggest thinking about this from the other direction: instead of trying to learn everything possible about statistics so that you can be ready for some kind of unknown research gig in the future, first figure out what kind of research you want to do, and then you will know what kind of statistical training you need to have in order to do it. You should also consider that most research is done in teams, and you will likely have a professional statistician (i.e., someone with a PhD in this stuff) working with you. Meaning, if you're a physician working with a statistician on a project, it likely won't be you who's crunching the numbers!
     
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