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toughlife

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I had my first interview last week and I was asked to opine on the future of anesthesiology, and GI docs lobby on propofol warning label removal.
I voiced my concerns about both, was clear on my stance and alluded to midlevels as well. Since then, I have been wondering if it was meant as a trick question and wether I f***** myself up by saying what I think rather than taking a more passive and balanced position.

So I wonder how to approach that next time I am asked about the same issues or others that I have firms opinions about?
 

Idiopathic

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I would hedge my bets with a "I understand how many could see it X way, given blah, blah, blah, but personally, I see it Y way..." You would be surprised just how much this kind of one-person debate can present your point and also an opposing point, making you look thoughtful, composed, intelligent and articulate. Im sure your point was made well, but if you want to speak freely on a subject, this is one way to avoid sounding like a psycho :laugh:

Its probably okay though, and I wouldnt worry about it too much.
 

bullard

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Idio makes good points. I'd bet $$$ that the point of the question is just to see if you've thought about these subjects at all. Most applicants probably aren't aware of the propofol labeling issue. You got nothing to worry about. :)
 
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militarymd

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tell them what you think. not telling the truth is never a good answer.
 

E'01

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toughlife said:
I had my first interview last week and I was asked to opine on the future of anesthesiology, and GI docs lobby on propofol warning label removal.
I voiced my concerns about both, was clear on my stance and alluded to midlevels as well. Since then, I have been wondering if it was meant as a trick question and wether I f***** myself up by saying what I think rather than taking a more passive and balanced position.

So I wonder how to approach that next time I am asked about the same issues or others that I have firms opinions about?
I wasn't even aware of the above. Where did you find this out?
 

Trisomy13

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E'01 said:
I wasn't even aware of the above. Where did you find this out?
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=234925

I'm learning that just browsing this forum and hearing the different sides of debates, and gleaning information from the practicing anesthesiologists here is very helpful when I sit down to "talk shop" during an interview.

Thanks to all the contributors here who could easily find something else to do with their time but choose to help us with their experience and insight. :)
 

toughlife

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E'01 said:
I wasn't even aware of the above. Where did you find this out?
By reading the ASA website and posts on this forum. Go to www.asahq.org for more info. You can get a student membership for $10 and get copies of "Anesthesiology".

Incidentally, the October edition has an article under the "classic papers revisited' section about pulmonary artery catheters in anesthesia practice. This is obviously common knowledge but it is interesting to learn how some of the tools available now came to be.
 
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