docbiohazard

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Ok, I searched around the archives and didn't find a current answer. For all the MD/PhDs applying to residency, have you found any consensus on how to list your MD/PhD? You appear to have two options:

1) List the PhD under the "Education" section, and the MD under the "Medical Education" section, with the completion dates of each (if different)...

2) Under "Medical Education", select "Combined MD/PhD"

It seems either method would work, but it seems like #1 might run the risk of a program or reviewer "missing" the fact that you were in an MD/PhD program. Also, I know in some programs you are considered to recieve both degrees upon completion of the MD, which makes #2 seem correct...

any advice is appreciated...
BH
 

lushmd

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I went with #2 (in part because, as you mentioned, at my institution both degrees are conferred at the same time). Of course, also list your research in the "Experience" section of the CV/CAF.
 

docbiohazard

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I went with #2 (in part because, as you mentioned, at my institution both degrees are conferred at the same time). Of course, also list your research in the "Experience" section of the CV/CAF.
Yep. The interesting thing is that, in terms of my transcript, my PhD was actually conferred at the last graduation, so it appears to have been conferred on a different date than my MD will be, although all institutional rules state the degrees are conferred simultaneously.

I'm also assuming you don't list the PhD as a reason your MD education was "interrupted or prolonged", because we're on a different schedule, so it's not "out of the ordinary" or a reason for concern?

BH
 
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lushmd

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I'm also assuming you don't list the PhD as a reason your MD education was "interrupted or prolonged", because we're on a different schedule, so it's not "out of the ordinary" or a reason for concern?
Actually, I did mention the PhD as a reason for my education being prolonged/interrupted. I am not sure if it was the right thing to do, but it seemed appropriate (I just gave a very brief explanation re taking time for research).
 

docbiohazard

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Actually, I did mention the PhD as a reason for my education being prolonged/interrupted. I am not sure if it was the right thing to do, but it seemed appropriate (I just gave a very brief explanation re taking time for research).
Mmm would love to hear some more input on this. To me, that section of questions is related to "problems" and while our medical education follows a different schedule, so long as that schedule is adhered to, it's not "prolonged"... but I could see it the other way too. I wish ERAS had more verbose help documentation / explanations similar to a FAFSA or something.

So, any other MD/PhDs care to share if they checked Yes for the question about "prolonging your medical education" secondary to their PhD research?

Thanks
BH
 

malchik

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I don't consider it a prolongation in the sense that it is intended. I didn't check that box. I don't think it matters at all one way or another. I also don't think it matters whether you point out the PhD under Education or just check the combined degree, or both. It will be clear to anyone who spends more than 30 seconds reading your application what the situation is, and in pathology, it's hardly extraordinary.
 

mdphd2b

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Ok, I searched around the archives and didn't find a current answer. For all the MD/PhDs applying to residency, have you found any consensus on how to list your MD/PhD? You appear to have two options:

1) List the PhD under the "Education" section, and the MD under the "Medical Education" section, with the completion dates of each (if different)...

2) Under "Medical Education", select "Combined MD/PhD"

It seems either method would work, but it seems like #1 might run the risk of a program or reviewer "missing" the fact that you were in an MD/PhD program. Also, I know in some programs you are considered to recieve both degrees upon completion of the MD, which makes #2 seem correct...

any advice is appreciated...
BH
So...I went w/ #1, mainly b/c we get our PhD earlier (2006) than the MD (2008). So, since I have the PhD degree, I did not select the #2 option for combined MD/PhD degree program, since that implies I would get BOTH in May 2008.

N-E-ways, I also listed MSTP (combined MD/PhD) training as the reason for prolongation of MD training, plus I have it plastered all over my application in various places (research, pubs, PS, LOR writers--including the apparently "required" letter from my thesis advisor--we were told it's considered a "red flag" if you don't have one apparently!).

I thought the explanation of "prolonged" training was important, since in PA there's a rule about having to complete all 3 USMLE steps in 7 years max (but MSTP students are exceptions, get a letter written to exempt them if they pass the deadline).

Hope this helps! :luck:
 

Hard24Get

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So...I went w/ #1, mainly b/c we get our PhD earlier (2006) than the MD (2008). So, since I have the PhD degree, I did not select the #2 option for combined MD/PhD degree program, since that implies I would get BOTH in May 2008.

N-E-ways, I also listed MSTP (combined MD/PhD) training as the reason for prolongation of MD training, plus I have it plastered all over my application in various places (research, pubs, PS, LOR writers--including the apparently "required" letter from my thesis advisor--we were told it's considered a "red flag" if you don't have one apparently!).

I thought the explanation of "prolonged" training was important, since in PA there's a rule about having to complete all 3 USMLE steps in 7 years max (but MSTP students are exceptions, get a letter written to exempt them if they pass the deadline).

Hope this helps! :luck:
On the other hand, although I officially received my PhD in 2006, I did not think this was important, and felt it was more accurate to state I was in a MD-PhD program since I did not apply separately for the degrees, etc (this made the prolongation statement unnecessary). I almost did it the other way, but MD-PhD was an option, so... :shrugs:.

Don't think it really matters, but "prolongation" did seem like a red flag and is the same terminology they use for badness on the dean's letter, so I didn't choose it. If you are worried about getting brownie pts for being MD-PhD, it is, as mdphd2b pointed out, plastered all over your application and often the first sentence of your mspe. No escaping it.
 

docbiohazard

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N-E-ways, I also listed MSTP (combined MD/PhD) training as the reason for prolongation of MD training, plus I have it plastered all over my application in various places (research, pubs, PS, LOR writers--including the apparently "required" letter from my thesis advisor--we were told it's considered a "red flag" if you don't have one apparently!).
I have been told the very same thing about the letter from the advisor, and have heard (at least second hand) about one person who didn't have a letter from their advisor and then had to scramble to get one when several top tier programs asked her why she didn't, and requested she get one... It all worked out in the end, she wound up at one of the top tier programs - after she got the letter.

Don't think it really matters, but "prolongation" did seem like a red flag and is the same terminology they use for badness on the dean's letter, so I didn't choose it. If you are worried about getting brownie pts for being MD-PhD, it is, as mdphd2b pointed out, plastered all over your application and often the first sentence of your mspe. No escaping it.
Yeah. Not really worried about the brownie points, because it is obvious, especially with the rest of my application as has been pointed out. I think I'm going to avoid the prolongation statement if for no other reason than to jive with my MSPE. It occurs to me in the draft of my MSPE that I got to review, it states that there was no unusual prolongation - and I think that jives with the structure of the program, the schedule, in so forth. All in all, I doubt it matters. Still, I'm glad to hear people have done it both ways w/o major consequence.

Did anyone develop an arbitrary cut-off for listing poster sessions? I got tired last night before I got to the yearly mandatory departmental ones...

Thanks for all the help,
BH
 

Hard24Get

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Still, I'm glad to hear people have done it both ways w/o major consequence.
Well, we may yet have major consequences since we are applying this year, too....:p

Did anyone develop an arbitrary cut-off for listing poster sessions? I got tired last night before I got to the yearly mandatory departmental ones...
I only put the times I gave a talk at the departmental or MSTP meetings and only mentioned international/national meeting posters, left out the boring obligatory posters. But that's just my style, I'm sure I will look inexperienced compared to those that did the opposite. :)
 

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I did it like #1, since I received the PhD on an earlier date. And I didn't put anything under prolonged education.

And there were no adverse consequences to doing it this way that I'm aware of. I ended up where I wanted to be :)
 

gbwillner

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Well, we may yet have major consequences since we are applying this year, too....:p



I only put the times I gave a talk at the departmental or MSTP meetings and only mentioned international/national meeting posters, left out the boring obligatory posters. But that's just my style, I'm sure I will look inexperienced compared to those that did the opposite. :)
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I agree here- the ERAS forms are not meant for us, but for the average med student who has no "real" publications, so they will be happy to list their abstracts. I think it would bore anyone to death reading my application if I listed all my abstracts and poster presentations. No one would read through it, so I just listed my peer-reviewed journal pubs only. I mentioned elsewhere the number of posters and conferences, etc.
 

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Although ours are conferred at the same time, I choose #1 (both education and medical education separate - they have MD/Phd options in both areas, and in my case, the phd will be conferred in a department outside the college of medicine).
 

docbiohazard

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I only put the times I gave a talk at the departmental or MSTP meetings and only mentioned international/national meeting posters, left out the boring obligatory posters. But that's just my style, I'm sure I will look inexperienced compared to those that did the opposite. :)
Heh, I decided to list the poster sessions I attended which consisted of larger groups of grad students / residents etc, often associated with my intramural funding, and didn't list my required departmental poster sessions or work-in-progress talks, mostly because I had firmer dates for the former... :) Plus, it was getting kind of verbose and repetitive.

I'm sure it'll all work out. Thanks for all the advice.

BH
 

MelRoos

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I listed my PhD a different date, and did not select prolongation of the training..
Did you all list abstracts?
I have 18 papers so just got sick of doing it all and didn't put in any of the abstracts. I figured I'd have a printed form of my CV with all of them for interviewers, since a lot are coming out right now and it's changing anyway.... now I'm wondering if that was a mistake- but it was just so tedious...
thoughts?
 

Picklesali

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I listed my PhD a different date, and did not select prolongation of the training..
Did you all list abstracts?
I have 18 papers so just got sick of doing it all and didn't put in any of the abstracts. I figured I'd have a printed form of my CV with all of them for interviewers, since a lot are coming out right now and it's changing anyway.... now I'm wondering if that was a mistake- but it was just so tedious...
thoughts?
18 papers?!? What field do you work in?
 

MelRoos

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I had a fantastic mentor in a large lab with lots of collaborations, worked like a dog and had a lot of luck!!
 
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