1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

How to be an ER Tech?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Raja, Apr 7, 2002.

  1. Raja

    Raja Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2001
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can anyone tell me what needs to be done? I heard about two-day programs (for a weekend) to learn how to draw blood, etc. but that somewhat frightens me. If you guys know of the different roads to take (because I'm very very interested in doing what an ER Tech does) please share your knowledge with me. thanks guys.
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Aeromonas

    Aeromonas Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2001
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    I first became an EMT-then I worked as an ER Tech
     
  4. rxfudd

    rxfudd 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Messages:
    1,343
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Some hospitals will require you to get an EMT-B or EMT-I license first - this is probably for the best, since you'll be able to do more being officially licensed. Others will train you on the job. You'll probably have to call each hospital that you are interested in on an individual basis to find out what they require.
     
  5. Raja

    Raja Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2001
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    So after getting an EMT-B license I can do ER Tech work? Or what is it, another class?

    also, is it hard to get a job as an ER Tech?
     
  6. rxfudd

    rxfudd 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Messages:
    1,343
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Usually the EMT-B license is sufficient, but getting the EMT-I may allow you to do more. After that, there should only be on-the-job training. Again, every hospital is different, so you'll get a lot more info from making a few phone calls next week and asking what is required of you (and if they're hiring).
     
  7. gg

    gg Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2001
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    0
    EMT-B license helps a lot in getting a tech's job at ER but it's not required (it depends on the hospital). Some places will train you from the very basics but it is always to your advantage to have some kind of prior training or at least some kind of exposure in the medical field (volunteering, CNA license, etc.). You do not learn how to draw blood while getting an EMT-B license – this is something that the hospital will train you to do. Same goes for learning the basic cardiac arrhythmias (v-tach, v-fib, a-fib, various heart blocks, etc.) so you can know what is going on. It also helps when you have to do a 12-lead EKG.
     
  8. Raja

    Raja Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2001
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is there any other route instead of the EMT? I really don't want to do the EMT job. I don't think I can handle being in an ambulance all day.
     
  9. gg

    gg Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2001
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    0
    I did not want to be in the ambulance either. I just wanted to work in the ER. When I was getting my EMT license I was only required (at least in Chicago) to have one 8-hour ride on the ambulance (as a clinical). And again, you do not need EMT license to work in the ER. You have to check each hospital for their requirements.
     
  10. rxfudd

    rxfudd 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Messages:
    1,343
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Raja:
    <strong>Is there any other route instead of the EMT? I really don't want to do the EMT job. I don't think I can handle being in an ambulance all day.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Again, I'm giving you the general picture. As I've said, you have to call each hospital individually to find out what they require of you. Some will not make you get the EMT license, some will not require it but will limit what you can do, and some will require it. Tomorrow is Monday - CALL THE HOSPITALS.
     
  11. KelliJelliBeans

    KelliJelliBeans Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    291
    Likes Received:
    0
    rxfudd I PMed you.
     
  12. UrSexyLatinDr

    UrSexyLatinDr Single and looking =o)~
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2002
    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    0
    You can also get an E.R. Tech job by having your CNA (Certified Nursing Assistant) or as they mentioned above, by having your EMT-1 or EMT-B. You will be able to do more stuff with your EMT license then with your CNA. You should take an EMT course, there are about a semester long, so it isnt that long. You can tell the hopsital you are in the process of getting your EMT licence and if they can let you start training. Thats what I did and it worked out really well. Whatever you chose Good Luck, bu as I said, its better to be licensed as an EMT.

    Eduardo :cool:
     
  13. i'm living in indiana right now, and at the hospital where i work you don't have to have anything (except maybe your h.s. diploma and good recommendations from previous employers) to become an ER tech. you get a few weeks of paid on-the-job training and you're all set. so i'd suggest talking with the human resources departments of hospitals near you. good luck!
     
  14. UCMonkey

    UCMonkey Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2001
    Messages:
    511
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was an ER tech for 6 years - here's my take.

    It really depends on the hospital like everyone else said. I'll qualify that though - it has been my experience that the bigger the hospital, the more training you will generally be required to have. If you don't want to go through the process of getting an EMT or other cert, I'd say stick to smaller (usually community-type) facilities. No matter where you go, though, you WILL be required to get CPR cert'd (almost always AHA BLS for Healthcare Provider).

    Personally, though I think if you are willing to get some sort of cert, I think an EMT would be much more useful in the ER setting than a CNA - the scope of practice is wider and the knowledge base is much more useful in terms of you understanding what's going on with the patients.

    Many times, also, without an EMT, you may be restricted to clerical / unit secretary type jobs.

    And to dispel what appears to be a misconception on this thread - EMT'S ARE NOT CONFINED TO AMBULANCES.
     

Share This Page