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How to pay for postbacc classes?

Discussion in 'Postbaccalaureate Programs' started by virtuoso735, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. virtuoso735

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    Okay, so I have my undergrad degree in biology, and wish to apply to medical or dental school in the future, but my GPA is not too great (3.42 overall, 3.25 bcpm). I want to take two or three classes at a local state university as to add more science classes to my transcript and boost my GPA a little. I realize that even if I get A's in them, that it won't help raise my GPA too much, but it's at least something, right? I'm not looking to do a formal postbacc program, but only a few classes to help my GPA. Are there any forms of financial aid (i.e. loans) for people who want to do this, or are there only loans for those that do formal postbacc programs? Any one in this situation?
     
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  3. robflanker

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    There are loans, but only grad plus or private loans. Nothing from the federal government to the best of my knowledge.

    Or straight cash
     
  4. rgerber85

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    There's always the 2nd BS degree option, but you need to be smart about it.

    I'm attending Boston University and have had the majorirty of the second degree program classes waived b/c I've taken them previously. I'm repeating 4 classes and taking 8 new ones. BU's req is that I take a min of 12 classes in their system and I can graduate with the BS in Biology and use it as an informal post-bacc (2 semesters and a summer session) ... I did have to do my homework on this one though, but it was worth the effort.

    Since I'm enrolled in a degree granting program, I'm receiving federal aid (sub and unsub'd stafford loans) + doing a few private student loans to help the cost of living + books b/c I won't be working.

    to the OP, if you want it, after speaking with a lot of adults who are MD's, JD's, MS's, PhD's, who all work in the medical field... respectfully... if you can manage your finances in the future, you should be fine. It will pay itself out depending on the effort you put into it.

    I'm 26, and NOT working... b/c I'm studying for the MCAT full time, volunteering, and prepping for this coming semester. So I'm going to be living off loans... I want this. It's all what you can handle. Personally, I don't think I can handle 3 classes, studying for the MCAT, and I'm volunteering 2 hours a day for 4 days a week so I can get rent cheaper (600/month) in Boston, Ma for my own room in a 4 bed room house... that's a long story and took a lot of fighting for. lol, but it's sooo worth it. Look into what I'm doing... it may help you financially. Federal loans are easier to deal with that private lending. Unless you can work while going to school... doing an informal post bacc by taking night classes will work too.

    I wish you luck OP!
     
  5. robflanker

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    You see, you told your story again...for the millionth time...

    Anyway, OP - the 2nd degree thing only works if you didnt take out loans for your first degree I believe. Basically, you can't do federal loans for 2 undergrad degrees.
     
  6. smiley27

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    sometimes it's a good thing when rgerber85 posts because some topics make you facepalm at the lack of initiative our fellow premed colleagues show and reading rgerber85's posts makes you forget about what the topics are even about :D

    keep up the good work!!
     
    #5 smiley27, Aug 17, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2011
  7. rgerber85

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    Honestly, you're right... it most situations. And I'm stopping that, but in this situation I'm trying to give the OP an idea of what I did if he/she is worried about financing a post-bacc.


    Most post-bacc programs don't give much federal aid. Doing a second degree program can help if you can get the university to waive a lot of the pre-reqs outside of the college due to your prior bachelors degree (like I had to find out about) to complete the program more quickly. Post-baccs vary in a minute range of classes needed, but in my situation i need a minimum of 12 classes (2 semesters and a summer) to complete the 2nd degree (as an informal post-bacc) (with all the necessary classes need for the pre-med reqs while retaking a couple)... all the while, because it is a second degree program.. I'm receiving federal aid (stafford loans). With federal aid (loans), as we all know, although still a loan, is more tolerable to deal with than a private lender. Large private lenders such as citibank, salliemae, nelliemae... have all these bull**** rules and fees, so make sure you read the fine print, OP.

    And scholarships can be your best friend.

    I recommend myFSA (scholarship wizard) b/c it'll remember your criteria for a search for scholarships in the nt'l database.

    Happy hunting.

    https://studentaid2.ed.gov/logon.asp?nextpage=%2Fgetmoney%2Fscholarship%2Fv3search%2Easp%3F%26

    also search educational philanthropists in (name of state or city) within the google search. If you can write a 1 page, moving essay, sometimes they come through with some funding. Try it, see if it works.

    good luck OP.
     
  8. DrMidlife

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    I think you can get Staffords for a postbac, but nowhere near cost of attendance.

    I got $10,500 per year doing a 2nd bachelors a few years ago. I think it's $12,500 now. In particular, prep work for grad school has a Stafford allowance. See http://www.finaid.org/loans/studentloan.phtml.

    I strongly advise against private student loans for doing a postbac. This additional debt load is not manageable in the same way as federal loans. If you have to get private loans to get ready to apply to med school, then the plan has to be that you'll get them paid off before you start med school.

    Best of luck to you.
     
  9. rgerber85

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    I would agree with midlife about private lending. It's a hassle... a mistake I once made.

    You see, the story begins.. blah blah blah

    anyhow, it is 12500.00 / yr (depending on how much you've borrowed previously) according to BU's Fin Aid Dept.. I'm trying to appeal that though. It MAY be possible, if your aggregate loan amt as a dep is 37k or indep is 57k... it's meant for a 4 year program, but if you're doing a 2 year program, i don't see why they shouldn't be able to allocate more funding per year now?

    It might be an idea to throw towards your fin aid advisor.

    If you use 12.5 k per year, and you have 1 more semester, you are allowed to appeal if your aggregate loan amt exceeds cost of attendance, for the stafford loan to cover all costs of the final semester.

    good luck again op
     
  10. virtuoso735

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    Thanks for the input. I'm not really familiar with loans and borrowing practices, since I didn't take out any loans during undergrad. So if I apply for a second bachelor's degree, I can get federal loans? I won't need very much, since there is a local state university very close to where I live. I could just live at home, and the only expenses I would need paid is tuition and books. Is it too late to apply for federal loans now? Let's say I want to take 3 classes through the course of the year; I wouldn't be doing a second bachelor's degree, nor would I be doing a postbacc program. Would I be able to get loans for this?
     
  11. rgerber85

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    If the program is rolling admissions and you did your fafsa on time, I don't see why not? Just make sure your fafsa is up to date on the uni you plan on attending...
     
  12. virtuoso735

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    I didn't submit a FAFSA this year since I didn't think of doing a postbacc back in Spring when I usually submit the forms...:( The semester starts in a month, do you think I could get the FAFSA in and try to get it sorted by then, or is it too late?
     
  13. rgerber85

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    go to fafsa.ed.gov and call their helpline. I honestly wouldn't know...

    perhaps someone else who is on these boards may help?

    I can tell you, speaking with a rep from the us dept of edu was useless. i had to make friends with the director of the fin aid dept at the uni i'm doing this informal post-bacc second degree program and brainstorm ideas to appeal an increase in federal aid since having my bs and ms already limit my ability to get perkins loans, pell grants, mass state grants, and uni grants. those are reserved for individuals without bachelors degrees.

    So definitely inquire within your fin aid dept if you're enrolled!
     
  14. common man

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    can you elaborate please? i have a sallie mae student signature loan at 11% interest rate. i can defer the payments for up to 15 years as long as i remain enrolled at least half time (although the high interest rate continues to accumulate). besides the interest rate, what's the disadvantage? i appreciate the input.
     
  15. robflanker

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    Are you joking? "Beside the high interest rate..."

    11% interest compounding over 15 years? You are never going to pay that off

    You need to speak to a financial advisor or financial aid person, immediately
     
  16. PTWOB02

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    You need to submit FAFSA to qualify for Stafford loans. Usually schools have a deadline for FAFSA submission by mid March. Since you are past that deadline, if I were you, I would call the Financial Aid office immediately, explain your situation to them and see if they can make an exception for you. Please keep us posted on what they say.
     
  17. common man

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    good advice...will do :thumbup:
     

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