Howdy!

Discussion in 'Clinicians [ RN / NP / PA ]' started by rdennisjr, Apr 30, 2001.

  1. rdennisjr

    rdennisjr SDN Super Moderator
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2000
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey folks - guess I'll be the first to say 'thanks' to the sdn folks for setting aside this new PA area! I certainly hope that this can become a very active area of discussion and more importantly a place where student doctors, student PA's, student NP's and everyone else can come and learn about each others skills, limitations, and dreams!

    I'll be starting PA school through the military this fall - so I'm a bit of an oddball in that I didn't go through the civilian application process - but I'll be happy to answer any questions that are posed!

    Enjoy!
     
  2. Sunlyght

    Sunlyght Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2000
    Messages:
    177
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is cool, so this is a new forum...Nice

    Good move SDN
     
  3. erambo

    erambo Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2001
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    rdennisjr...
    How does it work through the military? Where will you be going to a program? I guess you have to commit time to service when you get out, right? I think that's great if so...and you won't have all the heavy student loans like most of the rest of us to face for forever...hehe...
     
  4. rdennisjr

    rdennisjr SDN Super Moderator
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2000
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    0
    erambo:
    The military route is a bit different than the civilian schools, but the education is identical plus you end up with some military specific training (ie - chemical weapons, etc) and the focus I believe is a bit greater in trauma management when you get to those topics. Anyhow, you were wondering how the military school works, so here it is:

    The Interservice Physician Assistant Program (IPAP) IPAP home page or Army National Guard Medical Recruiting
    is a 2+ year program that trains both active duty and Guard/Reserve Army, Air Force, Navy, Coast Guard, and Fed. Prision personel as Physician Assistants. The school is taught in two phases - phase 1 (didactic) at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio Texas. The second phase (clinical) is at various military posts in the continental United States. At the end of the program, you are eligble to sit for the PANCE exam, receive a bachelors degree from University Of Nebraska-Medical Center (will be upgrading to a Masters degree in the near futurer), and receive a commision as an officer in what ever branch you are in. In return, there is a service commitment, and while I do not know what it is for the active duty or other branches, in the Army Guard it is currently six years of National Guard time (ie - 2 weeks in the summer, one weekend a month). While you are at the school you are paid as an E-5 (SGT) or higher if you are of a higher rank and treated as an officer candidate. In addition, the military will pay up to 50k of student loans off (ie - undergrad) and there is currently a 30k bonus at the mid-point of your 6 year commitment. While an undergrad degree is not a requirement, at least 60 hours and various pre-reqs are required (listed on the web site). Competition is fairly fierce for the program - each class has 60 seats, and of those 60, they are divided up between the various branches. In my class, 10 seats were reserved for the Army National Guard, so you are competing with soldiers from all 50 states for one of those 10 seats. Application requirements are again listed on the web page.

    Okay - enough babling about the school, but I do have one other critical point. Just like med students, if you are not interested in the military life, don't do this just for the cash. I've enjoyed 13 years in the army guard now, and it has been both financially and personally very fullfilling. I've gotten to do things that very few people in the world have done - from flight medic in combat zones, to riding a camel, to working with soviet medics. However, there is a price to pay - twice in my years I've been yanked from school or work and family to head to foriegn shores - once for desert storm and once for a rotation in Bosnia. While interesting, those are not stress free vacations. You need to be dedicated, at least somewhat patriotic, and willing to work hard. Not everything you do will be fun or directly related to what your final goal is, but you will learn more about yourself, the world, and life in general than you ever will from a textbook or class. That said, if you are interested, go for it! And if you need assistance locating additional information, let me know and I will help in any way I can. :D
     
  5. erambo

    erambo Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2001
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    rdennisjr,

    Thanks for that informative post. Actually, I wanted to inquire for a few ER tech friends of mine who have been having trouble getting into med school and are now looking at the PA program as an alternative. They are young males and unattached so I thought it might be attractive to them. I'll pass on your information...thanks.

    I however had to compete as well for my spot this fall...out of approx. 850-1000 applicants (50 accepted) to the Emory PA (Masters) program there are not very many spots for us non traditional students. I do believe I may hold the record this fall for being the oldest at 47. Second career for me...as well as second rotation through university...graduated in 98 with a BS in Biology and a minor in Chem. If I were younger the military program would appeal to me. I have also thought it would be interesting to go work for the CDC in outbreak situations. I am not in this at my age for the money but have other goals and purposes that I hope to serve. Good luck to you and thanks you again for the info.

    Beth
     
  6. rdennisjr

    rdennisjr SDN Super Moderator
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2000
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Beth - sounds like a fascenating life so far - my second time around also - spent the last 12 years or so getting my masters in Architecture and doing the architecture thing for a while, and now on to the next challange. I hope to keep in touch and see how it goes for another non-trad student! :D

    In anycase, glad the info may be of some use to your friends.

    Dennis
     

Share This Page