Quantcast

Info on UERMMMCi

Application is now open for MD & PhD 2022 Intake
This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
During undergraduate, I began thinking about attending Medical School in the Philippines for a lot of reasons. Now, everyone has different reasons for attending a foreign medical school, and each one of my friends have their own specific reasons including myself, and I'm sure those who have taken the NMAT and are planning to apply to schools here in the Philippines must also have theirs... thus why they are considering attending here. Prior to such said decision, I am pretty positive that most if not all have done extensive research about attending Medical School in the Philippine; Cause I was once in your shoes and I did the same. I search the internet for different forums and medical school websites in hopes that I can find the right school. I am currently a student at UERMMMC. In hopes that I can shed some light about my college, I'll try to share and divulge some information about my university. I'll try to be unbias as possible. I hope this can answer several questions that you guys may have since sometimes contacting the schools in the Philippines are hard. At least i'll share with you guys my first hand experience.I'll share both pros and cons as well regarding my opinion about certain things.

What type of education am I going to get in UERM?

UERM is a tradiational base medical school. Their curriculum WILL prepare you greatly for the Philippine Boards, but will not prepare you for the USMLE. Although it'll give you a foundation, you MUST parallel study in order to do well for the USMLE. Most of the Professors are good and conducts their lessons in English, with occassional tagalog from time to time. Learning tagalog is optional and will make things a lot easier (I'll explain why later), but its not mandatory. Classes are from 8 am to 5 pm, with 1 hour lunch break from 12 to 1pm. So as one can see, everyday is really long and this goes on 5 days a week. After class, its mandatory (because you will fall behind) to study for the rest of the night in order to catch up. Although attending class will give you a basic idea on what to study, self-study is a MUST especially for fil-ams. The way things are conducted here are completely different from what you've encountered. Its tons of memorization, with emphasist on... memorization. The Philippine Board Exam seems to rely heavily on memory and thus exams in UERM ask very, very detailed questions... sometimes too detailed that it feels so uncessary, but nonetheless it is their goal to prepare their students for the Philippine Boards. Those who intend to practice in the US, which are basically all the filams and foreign students, are left to study for the USMLE on their own. UERM and most schools in the Philippines are competing every year to see who gets the highest passing rate in the PHilippine boards every year. This is the way they determine which school is the best and increase their attractiveness for potential future students as well as increase their student body. this is very important for UERM and thus the reason why they cater for the students towards the Philippine Board exams. They Long term exams and student preparations revolves around their boards...which of course are completely different from USMLE style questions which are relaint on Problem Base Lectures, with emphasist on clinical correlation and applications.

In UERM, and UST and probably several schools in the Philippines, gives you an option studying from transcripts. What are they? First question I asked when I saw them. Transcripts or "trans" for short are documents that was typed up by students that covers everything that the professor lectured in class, and covers all topics for that day. It comprises of multiple trans, with each year being updated. For example, the freshmans this year are using the trans from last year and updating it and creating their own in preparation for exams. It's quite helpful for the exams, as it gives you a somewhat detailed studying material prior, during, and after lectures. Sometimes, trans alone can give you a high grade during exams especially if "memorized". This again will help you really well for the test in the Philippines but definitely not for the USMLE. You'll find yourself, especially during first year, relying on trans just to pass the exams that you wont have time for anything else which is the case for many of the foreign students here. If ever, ask around and they will tell you the same... no time for USMLE prep, during first year especially.

However if you look around this forum and happen to stumble upon Doc Tan, who studied USMLE from Day 1 and managed to match in surgery... his case was different.... WAY different. What made me attend UE was because of stories such as DocTan's however what I failed to realize was that there is such a huge difference during his time (2006) as compared to ours. UERM was PBL back then, and went back to traditional after 2006.. He was basically the last to have done PBL. As I mentioned earlier, UERM cares a lot about its reputation and appearance, maybe even too much, that it cannot do things that might harm their image. During PBL, many of the local students did not fair well during the Philippine Board exams, however, this was very benefitial for USMLE test takers in many ways.

The Facilities: Oh man... where do I begin... Now you guys have to really look at this in two perspective views. I'll try to be unbiase with this one but it's just really hard... not to be...

Their facilities here (UERM) are lacking... For the most part, you're entire 3 years here will require you to travel to two buildings... only. This school consist of 3 buildings, a hospital, and a gym. Yep... thats it... Sad to say (opinion here) my HS is bigger than this place...

3 Buildings: 1st Building consist of the admin/nursing/physical therapy building: Classes here are a lot nicer for some reason which is specifically only for nurses and physical therapies. 2nd Building - Med college building which consist of the medical depatments and a very small library. On top of the floor is a room called PLR, which you will have to familiarize yourself with... thats your classroom for the next 3 years. A windowless room with lots of chair... 3rd Building is (i forgot the name) its the building next to the hospital lol which has the biochem and anatomy department. this is where biochem labs and anatomy labs are located. The top floor is called Ani Amphi Theatre, a room which you will love and hate as you are stuck there for again, 3 years.

Classrooms - There are several, which consist of rooms, and just chairs with built in desk. If you are 6 feet and above or slightly big... you are going to have a hard time... One room to be specific is again the ani amphi room. It's severely cramp in there and the seats are really OLD... like 1970s old... I dont know why UERM is not changing it... its quite hazardous really lol..Its rows of connected wooden chairs... (there is no such thing as ass cushion!) and behind the back rest of the other person is a wooden table that u pop up (like a airplane tray) to put your stuff on. This is nice but... its so old that it does not hold into place and falls on you... atleast on your knee, sending all of yoru stuff into the floor. Just adding this info because imagine dropping your lap top. Its really is bad...

Labs - Cadavres... I really feel bad about them. In the Philippines they are obtained from unclaimed bodies from hospitals and are bought. These are people who did not ask to be dissected but are forced because no one claimed them... These bodies have also been in the cooler for quite sometime now and are hard to study since they aren't fresh... anymore... Furthermore, they are kept in a semi warm room and preserve with a very toxic formula. But its okay though... the room is ventilated... for the most part. Several cadavres are so bad this year that there are actually maggots growing in certain places inside the cadavre...
As for biochem lab... where in the US there was a huge emphasis on safety and protocols, here there is none. No goggles, sometimes no gloves and tons of chemicals to hold with. Whats worse is that, the tools are obsolete. They had to make homemade pipets for titration... makes me wonder.. where our money is going to? (will discuss later)
Library - Opens at 8 am and closes at 5/7pm... i'll be bias here this time. Really... if you are in class from 8am to to 5pm and the library closes at 7 pm... 2 hours to study? Maybe I've just been spoiled with my univeristy's library being 24/7 or something... But the major problem here is finding a place to study properly...if you can study inside your dorm, then major props for you. But this school really doesn't cater for students after school. Doesnt feel college like... again.. wheres our money going to?

Hospital/Insurance Etc - This was a question I kept asking a lot when I was inquiring before going here. What happens when we are sick or get sick or need medical treatment and services? Theres an infirmary clinic for students... very very small and lacking. This clinic is your starting point whenever you get sick. This is where you obtain fee waivers from medicines, excuse notes, and referrals. As for curing you, forget it... The only thing they will keep doing is give you paracetamol (equivalent to tylenol) and kill your pain and thats about it... If its really bad, then they will send you to the ER.. For me, from my experience I had an awful time at UERM's hospital. I will only go there to pick up medicine until my (free meds which the student insurance gives you) runs out... because well... its limited. The hospital did not ask for medical history (quite hypocritical since in class they empahsize on taking medical history) and prescribed me meds that I might be allergic to. Just remember guys, its money first before your heatlh... trust me... and you have to run and do things on your own. Even if your dying from pain... Best have a friend to help you or go to st. luke's for your medical needs.

Classmates: Lot of them are nice. They are very helpful, giving, and friendly. Though some may have a tough time talking english to you not because they are incapable but its just not a comfortable thing for them. You will hear this saying "nose bleed" a lot which I believe means they are running out of english or something. But nonetheless many of them are smart and hardworking. Dont underestimate them though because they are used to their system and do well on exams. As for us, it takes getting use to, but again its all up to the students. However, you have to remember that many of your classmates are no older than 22 years old. So there are moments that will catch you off guard and there are things that they do may seem immature... sometimes too immature, and does not seem appropriate for medical school. Also remember, majority of the class are females and are very passive aggressive... just a warning...

Area - Mostly safe but VERY polluted... Just dont be out very late at night.
Dorm - 3 areas, Robinsdale at 24k pesos a month (roughly 500 dollars) all utilities paid for,hotel like size rooms, but some are nicer - looks like suites, fully furnished, including a very unstable wifi; keystone 15k a month, furnished, utilities not included in rent, apartment like (usually a decent size room); Anglo Residences: ranges from 6 - 10k a month, not furnished, utilities not included, room sizes ranges depending on rent price, usually the cheapest of the three. Fairly new building and stable electricity with generator. Meza Condo; makes you feel like your living outside of manila. Swimming pool, jogging place... its a condo. Its nice, rooms ARE VERY SMALL and ranges from 1 bedroom to 2br to 3br. Mostly you have to buy a unit but there are people who are renting it out. Rents ranges from 15 - 25k, utilities not included, not furnished... but again... its a condo...

Anglo and keystone u cannot cook inside... Robinsdale and Meza condo you can... but then again... imagine trying to cook inside your bedroom... enough said...

US rotation - umm 9 months I think, 2 hospitals: 1 in NY and 1 in Chicago. Greenbook in IM ONLY... Both are decent hospitals so you guys shouldnt worry about it. But again only greenbook in Internal Medicine.. Please see google what greenbook means if you dont know it.

Tuition - umm roughly 90k pesos per sem, 180k pesos a year: 4k dollars a year. There are a lot of things you have to pay for... that I didnt include. Oh ya I forgot, 10k dollars one time fee for foreign students. "donation fee" ha....
As for FAFSA? They said they will have it this year but I havent heard much of it. From what I was told, several students have been successful on helping out the school trying to get reapproved, but if you ever attend here, you will know that everything takes a long time. This year I don't think they will have it.

Also, everything in school is Student funded.... YES thats right... from our own pockets. makes you wonder where our money is going huh? Its just not me, its also everyone else. They only provide one copies to class for the most part and its up to the class to distribute and make a copy of it. Paper apparently is an issue in school so you will find yourself making copies of everything. Again the things that you may think the school will provide... will come from your pocket and IS not included in your tuition =)

Again I'm a current student here in UERM and if need be, email me for my own opinions and experience. This post I included is neither degrading or praising UERM. Showing the school based on my experience. There are things I'm happy about but there are things also I am very unhappy about...
I'll write a PRO and CON later... but as a student here this is my concern right now, also some of my own opinion.

USMLE - they are not training us for this and not even giving us time to prepare for it. Comming back from school at 5pm, the first thing I want to do is eat then sleep. Take a short power nap and to wake up and study... Its giving you a foundation but not helping you really for whats really important. The materials are similar but preparation is catered for its local students. I think Fatima has a foreign exclusive class or something. Why cant UE have that? A lot of people are taking the USMLE after their third year which is again up to them but its much better to take it after second year. But with the lack of time UE gives you to prepare for it, especially since they are back to traditional base lecture, really hinders parallel studies. What makes it worse is that there are assignments given meant for college and high school. We had to do a skit infront of the class, or make music videos as one of the assignments... really now... in medical school? instead of using my time to study we're making a skit and acting in class... I never knew UE is a liberal arts medical school... There are alot of time wasted on unnecessary but mandatory "materials" which is such a pain.. and a waste of time... then theres research... Im not sure if in medical school we have to do research but its mandatory here also... I thought that was something you do in college but guess its mandatory here too...

my main concern is money... where is it going? We dont have an ECG machine to practice with... no safety tools.... crappy facilities... just see it for yourself instead of taking my word for it... again where is our money going to?

What disturbs me is that they announce the school as a non-profit school but truthfully, its profiting BIG time. Does it cater for its studentS? Yes to some degree they do... if its going to improve their reputation. Again every filam and foreign students here are always wondering where our money is going... Becuase we really dont see it come back to us in anyway or form... They dont update their equipments and facilities... its like... the school has excess money comming in and yet they are budgeting... But again, money is an issue in the Philippines so... I'll leave it at that. But again, the owner of the UERM is also the owner of PHilippine Airlines... thats saying something isnt it... but who knows... Its non-profit yet the school is UERMMMCi: University of the EAST Rammon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center incorporated... lol I just find it funny... but hey... if these are not an issue for u, UERM is a good school to go to...

Anyways class is gonna start so if there are any other questions about UE, please feel free to post here or email me, especially if you want to know my own reasons for attending this place. Thanks...
 
Last edited:

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Overall it's a good school, but it has faults like any other school. Some of these things are not the schools fault but it seems like money is a issue for most of the medical schools here in the Philippines. Regardless of what school you guys choose, it is still a foreign medical school. And in the end what counts a lot is your USMLE score and US rotation experience. So choose accordingly and choose wisely.
 

edgeofmyseat

New Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Thanks for the info on UERM. I am not exactly a fil-am, but a balikbayan :) I grew up in Manila but have lived in the states for the last 13 or so years. I came back last month to start applying for med school here.
UERM is my top choice right now after visiting ASMPH, and two schools in Cebu. I really would ahve preferred ASMPH bec. it's SOO close to me and traffic is horrid here. And ASMPH's facilities are so nice, and the hospital is so modern. That's where I'm taking my 2-year-old son for doctor's visits etc. And it is also where I will probably get medical care for myself primarily. But I am afraid to take a chance on ASMPH as it is so new. Plus, they have a five year program. I am already 30 and have a family, so an additional year to get an MD/MBA isn't really practical for me.
UERM was attractive bec. of the US rotations. I did take a tour of UERM and saw the facilities for myself. The registrar is very helpful and nice. It's not a problem for me, I think. The problem that I foresee is the excess time to study bec. I will attempt to study for the USMLEs in parallel so I can take it after the second year. As I mentioned, I cannot spare to waste a whole year after graduation waiting to get matched to a residency program.

So the schedule is M-F 8-5 pm? It will probably take me 40min. to an hour of travel time to and from school. What about vacations? How long is Christmas and then summer break? Also, I am unclear about the whole greenbook thing. I thought I saw that one of the hospitals had a greenbook IM rotation and the other one had a FM greenbook rotation. Are the rotations at UERM hospital greenbook? So could you take just the IM in the states and then come back to UERM for the other ones?

Sorry for so many questions... Again, thanks for all your help!
 

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Class is monday-friday 8-5, but there are occasional ISP (Independent study periods, no class during a specific time frame) As for vacations, it's tentative, it changes according to events happening around. There are vacations, a semester and Christmas break but it can get reduced due to cancellation of classes. Basically some residences require applicants to have Greenbook rotations. There are greenbook rotations and non, but not all residences require greenbook. It depends where you are going to do your residency. Other than the affiliations UERM has already, you can always setup your own rotations in addition to using theirs. Many students fail to realize you can setup your own rotations, and not need to use the schools affiliated ones. However, UERM allows 9 months of foreign rotations, as opposed to UST only allowing 3 months. Fatima offers 1 year of foreign rotations. You have a good chance of setting up your own rotations as long as you complete the step 1 usmle and scored well.

Rotations in the Philippines are not greenbook and are not accepted in the US, and will require observation. Hope this helped, you owe me Sago Gulaman lol.
 

edgeofmyseat

New Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
hehehe. Sago Gulaman... Coffee, inasal na chicken...sure thing.

Since you already took the NMAT.. Do they have breaks between part i and II? And then, how did you deal with the no writing on the test booklet and no note papers allowed? FOr the MCAT they allow you to write on the test booklet.

I'll be seeing you at UERM, that is if I get accepted.
 

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
hehehe. Sago Gulaman... Coffee, inasal na chicken...sure thing.

Since you already took the NMAT.. Do they have breaks between part i and II? And then, how did you deal with the no writing on the test booklet and no note papers allowed? FOr the MCAT they allow you to write on the test booklet.

I'll be seeing you at UERM, that is if I get accepted.

Yea, they had a small break in between for lunch, I believe it was one hour. As for writing in the test booklet... I sort of wrote on mine, and I got reprimanded for it during my submission of my booklet, in which I just erased everything afterwards. Its pretty silly rule actually, but you can make due. NMAT isnt really hard, and Ive done quite well on it with hardly any preparation done. If you done well in MCAT, NMAT should be easy. Again done worry about it. Although if you are, read the reviewer, it gives you the basic idea and prepares you for the questions.
 

tantrum

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 30, 2005
Messages
439
Reaction score
0
I've been warning many potential students before that NO Philippine school will prepare you for USMLE. The story fo DocTan taking Step 1 after 2nd year was possible because UERM was PBL then. MOST Philippine schools are time and labor-intensive even if admission is lenient. The only school that MIGHT give you more time to parallel study is Fatima with their "special class".
As for facilities, most schools and hospitals facilities are inadequate for North American standards. The only decent ones are maybe St. Luke's and ASMPH.
For edgeofmyseat, UERM might be a good fit for you as you are a product of Philippine system but I just have to warn you that it is very difficult to take Step 1 under a traditional teaching system.
 

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
I've been warning many potential students before that NO Philippine school will prepare you for USMLE. The story fo DocTan taking Step 1 after 2nd year was possible because UERM was PBL then. MOST Philippine schools are time and labor-intensive even if admission is lenient. The only school that MIGHT give you more time to parallel study is Fatima with their "special class".
As for facilities, most schools and hospitals facilities are inadequate for North American standards. The only decent ones are maybe St. Luke's and ASMPH.
For edgeofmyseat, UERM might be a good fit for you as you are a product of Philippine system but I just have to warn you that it is very difficult to take Step 1 under a traditional teaching system.


Yea it really is tough, under traditional teaching system, theres so much things to do its quite annoying sometimes. In the beginning, I was really thinking about going to Fatima, though I read so much bad things about the school... it allows you to parallel study like tantrum said. But then again its still up to the student's dedication..
 

tantrum

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 30, 2005
Messages
439
Reaction score
0
A few more questions. About the donation fee, does that apply to everyone who graduated outside of the country? Can you take the NMAT in April and be accepted the same year? In your opinion, what are the top 5 med schools in the Philippines?
Since you've studied here in the Philippines, I'm sure you will easily adjust and not get shocked by the method or style of teaching in the Philippines. My first advice is just to finish your Bachelors degree in the US so you will have more option later on.
1. As for the donation fee, many schools will still charge you the fee as long as you had your "pre-med" in the US. Due to the fact that you are still a Filipino citizen, ask the administration of different schools (UST, UERM, FEU, DLSU, , or even the Cebu schools) which of them will waive the fee and GO TO THAT SCHOOL. It does not make sense to be paying any foreign/donation fee while you are a Filipino citizen.
2. Some schools will still accept you even if you take the NMAT in April. UST is strict about this but you might still have a chance at many schools.
3. Ranking of medical schools does not matter. Just go to an established one (more than 10 years of existence) and do your best in that school. If you are concerned about the local Philippine boards, the usual suspects are UST, CIM, PLM, St. Luke's, FEU, UERM.
 

edgeofmyseat

New Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
I understand your worries about getting into a med school in the States. It is SUPER competitive. But, if you can do it, I suggest you do that route. Then again, if you are having a hard time adjusting in the U.S. (I moved there when I was 17 and went to college there), maybe it is a good idea to come back home to study medicine. Just do your research on everything you need to do.

When I first made my decision to come back here, I did not know that it would be hard to take the USMLE step 1 and step 2 CS between 2nd and third year. That would mean not placing in a residency program 2 years after you graduate from med school. I am going to try and still take the exams between the 2nd and third years. So, that's a big negative to getting your degree here. Plus, it is harder to get into the popular residency programs if you do med here.

For me, I have a husband and a young child. It was easier for us to come here and have inexpensive childcare while I go to school. It would have been impossible there in the states.

For your question regarding donation fee. I do believe that UERM WON'T waive the $10,000 fee if you graduate from a foreign school (even if you are a FIlipino citizen). You can appeal it though. I don't know if I wil try bec. I want to do the US rotations through UERM and they said you have to pay the $10,000 to do that (Tantrum, can you confirm this one?)

Can I ask where in the states you have immigrated to? And what school you are in? It's harder to adjust in a huge University and in a place with not a lot of Asians. I was in San Diego, and there were a lot of Asian Americans and International students that I made friends with.
 

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
UERM is all about money, if you DID not graduate from a university in the Philippines you will BE required to pay 10k... period.
 

Saipan

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Messages
183
Reaction score
0
UERM is all about money, if you DID not graduate from a university in the Philippines you will BE required to pay 10k... period.

Students should avoid schools with obviously greedy tuition policies. There are a number of decent schools. Choose wisely, and remember that you are embarking on a four year long (maybe longer....hahaha) business relationship. Why choose a business partner who so obviously bends you over a barrel on your first tuition payment.

A school that treats you unfairly on your first day cannot be trusted to treat you fairly with problems that might arise in the future.

It would be foolish of Fil-Am students to pay 260 php for a Big Mac meal in McDo when everyone else only pays 130 php.

It's equally foolish to pay large "donation fees" when other schools have more attractive terms. It's a giant mistake to convince yourself that only one school fits your needs.

And if you still feel the need to pay big "donations" then do yourself a favor, and try to arrange a written (yes, documented!!!) payment schedule that divides it up over four years. Anything else is terribly abusive. Students can pay big fees upfront only to realize after a couple of months that med school in the PI is not for them. Refunds will not be forthcoming.
 

jmyph

New Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2009
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
My take on this topic:

You get what you pay for. UE basically is charging you $4k (average for Philippine medical school) per year or less than 1/10th of what you will expect to pay in a US medical school. If you break it down it is $400/month, or approximately $13 per day for 4 years to get an MD and if able to play your cards right, an opportunity to be financially secure for the rest of your life. I think it is still a pretty, pretty good deal.

With regards to the $10K donation, I think it is just reasonable. There is a shortage of MDs in the rural area. If a foreigner is going to take the place of a future Filipino MD who may fill this shortage, then the prosperctive foreign student should at least invest some money to help the school with expenses to offer scholarships and assistance to poor and needy filipino students. The donation is not under the table and is part of the arrangements with all Philippine medical schools. Take it or leave it. Even with the $10K, it is still a pretty good deal in my opinion. You may ask Doc Tan in a few years when he is earning possibly $200k-400k per year. If you go to the carribean, there may be no $10k initial donation, but you may have to spend possibly $40K per year for tuition alone, not to mention living expenses.

There is no short cut to being a doctor. You may have to sacrifice one way or another to get to your goal. There are many roads to achieving that goal, but there are pros and cons to each of the roads leading there. It behooves everybody to research these and decide based on what they think is right for them. The grass is always greener on the other side. If you read some of the threads, like the Carribean option, there is no shortage of complaints. Even US medical students have so many things to complain about, primarily of which is their $300k debt out of medical school.

Anyway good luck to you all and hopefully 5 or 10 years down the road when you are all US licensed doctors and earning a bunch, you can look back to your alma mater and say... hey thanks for the education you provided me and here is a check for $$$ as a sign of my appreciation.
 
Last edited:

Saipan

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Messages
183
Reaction score
0
I often hear opinions that the "donation" situation is reasonable. But these opinions are flawed, for a number of reasons.

I don't agree with the idea that "you get what you pay for". There are schools that ask for a 10k upfront one-time payment, schools that ask for a much lower figure, and schools that don't require such a payment. They all offer an essentially comparable service, despite anecdotal claims on this forum that one school may or may not be better than another. In such a situation, the logical choice is the value choice.

My advice is that a student should choose a school that doesn't treat foreign students as a cash cow to be milked. A 10k upfront one-time payment is basically a scam. Of course, it's a business deal, and the schools seem to be legally within their rights to ask for it. But there are two partners in any business deal. Students have other options. You should avoid any business deal which requires large upfront payments. Especially as in this situation, no school can guarantee success. Agreeing to such a deal only puts one behind the eight-ball.

Another argument is that somehow foreign students take the place of local students. This is totally wrong for a number of reasons, and shows a real lack of understanding of the situation in the Philippines.

Under the new law Fil-Ams (who do the appropriate paperwork) are Filipino citizens and hence are local, and under the law, should not be discriminated against. They should enjoy the full protection of the law and be treated equally with other Filipino citizens.

Of course, not every foreign student is a Fil-Am. But foreign students are NOT taking the "place of a future Filipino MD". This statement is absolutely false. The average medical school in the Philippines hasn't been able to fill all the seats in an entering class for quite a few years. Schools have lowered admission criteria, and many schools remain with empty seats in their classes. Only a few schools actually fill each class.

People are free to post rhetorical statements about how they feel it's a good deal. But the price of the upfront donations in a school in the Philippines cannot be justified by looking at the price of med schools in the US or the salary of US doctors. This is simply not logical. In fact, most foreign students in the Philippines are of Indian origin and will never practice in the States.

A lot of the statements from previous posters don't hold up under close examination.

Again, if there are a number of schools offering a similar product for different prices, perhaps you would be best served by NOT choosing the one that looks at you like you're a cow with five udders.
 

tantrum

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 30, 2005
Messages
439
Reaction score
0
For your question regarding donation fee. I do believe that UERM WON'T waive the $10,000 fee if you graduate from a foreign school (even if you are a FIlipino citizen). You can appeal it though. I don't know if I wil try bec. I want to do the US rotations through UERM and they said you have to pay the $10,000 to do that (Tantrum, can you confirm this one?)
UST and from what I heard UERM won't waive your $10K fee even if you are a Filipino citizen. But DLSU and some Cebu schools will waive the fee if you persist and speak to them nicely:)
 

tantrum

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 30, 2005
Messages
439
Reaction score
0
You get what you pay for. UE basically is charging you $4k (average for Philippine medical school) per year or less than 1/10th of what you will expect to pay in a US medical school. If you break it down it is $400/month, or approximately $13 per day for 4 years to get an MD and if able to play your cards right, an opportunity to be financially secure for the rest of your life. I think it is still a pretty, pretty good deal.

1. MY TAKE: If you are REALLY concerned about taking clinical rotations in the US, then UERM makes sense ONLY in comparison to Fatima. If you don't care about US rotations, any old established school (at least 10-15 years old) will do.

With regards to the $10K donation, I think it is just reasonable. There is a shortage of MDs in the rural area. If a foreigner is going to take the place of a future Filipino MD who may fill this shortage, then the prosperctive foreign student should at least invest some money to help the school with expenses to offer scholarships and assistance to poor and needy filipino students. The donation is not under the table and is part of the arrangements with all Philippine medical schools. Take it or leave it. Even with the $10K, it is still a pretty good deal in my opinion. You may ask Doc Tan in a few years when he is earning possibly $200k-400k per year. If you go to the carribean, there may be no $10k initial donation, but you may have to spend possibly $40K per year for tuition alone, not to mention living expenses.

2. MY TAKE: As Saipan has said, the reality is that other than the gov't subsidized schools like UP, PLM, or WVSU and competitive school like UST, many private med schools there don't even fill their quota. Don't ever think that you are taking away chances from local Filipinos. Most local grads there that can't afford tuition go to state schools. Foreign grads are rarely accepted to UP or PLM. I will agree with you that it is a better financial deal than Caribbean schools especially those that are not even recognized in 50 states. There are only 4 schools in the Caribbean that are approved in 50 states and going to any other school there is ridiculous.
 
Last edited:

tantrum

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 30, 2005
Messages
439
Reaction score
0
Another question, do you guys have an idea what will be the future of the doctors in the Philippines? I mean will the current trend (doctors taking nursing to go abroad) continue? Because I really want to practice in the Philippines. I want ot serve Filipinos.
I really appreciate the replies guys. It was all helpful. Good luck to you all and God bless!
If you can speak Tagalog well, by all means avoid those schools that will not waive donation fee. Aside from DLSU, inquire with MCU (Manila Central University), FEU, or even San Beda. Even AUF (Angeles) might be willing to waive the foreign fee.

If you like to live the simple life, it's not bad practicing in the Philippines. Contrary to popular belief, the shortage of doctors happen in remote rural areas. Most cities even in the provinces are saturated with specialists. The doctor to nursing phenomenon is ending as even nurses can't get a visa due to retrogression. There is an oversupply of nurses nowadays and many are PAYING just to get volunteer experience (now, that's a bigger scam). Guess what is the most common pre-med course nowadays?, NURSING. So I guess in a few years many med school will fill their quota with unemployed nurses.
If you want to serve, try working for 2 years there and you will recognize the frustration of doctors in dealing with the lack of any healthcare system.
 
Last edited:

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Students should avoid schools with obviously greedy tuition policies. There are a number of decent schools. Choose wisely, and remember that you are embarking on a four year long (maybe longer....hahaha) business relationship. Why choose a business partner who so obviously bends you over a barrel on your first tuition payment.

A school that treats you unfairly on your first day cannot be trusted to treat you fairly with problems that might arise in the future.

It would be foolish of Fil-Am students to pay 260 php for a Big Mac meal in McDo when everyone else only pays 130 php.

It's equally foolish to pay large "donation fees" when other schools have more attractive terms. It's a giant mistake to convince yourself that only one school fits your needs.

And if you still feel the need to pay big "donations" then do yourself a favor, and try to arrange a written (yes, documented!!!) payment schedule that divides it up over four years. Anything else is terribly abusive. Students can pay big fees upfront only to realize after a couple of months that med school in the PI is not for them. Refunds will not be forthcoming.

Wow this discussion is becoming more interesting. Like tantrum have mentioned, if you are considering US rotation and practicing in the US both UERM and Fatima is a good place to go. With that said, both schools however do require a donation... but now they call it MISC fee. To tell you the truth, its not much of a big deal considering, like it was mentioned earlier, you are paying for a tenth of what you pay for Medical School education in the US. Although there is a slight disadvantage, its still up to the student's discipline and luck to match at their desired residency,

From what Saipan mentioned, is sort of similar through my friend is going through at the moment. Here in UE and in most schools, there is a monthly plan installments of tuition fees. Such that in UE its roughly 90k pesos a semester, is split to several payments of 16k I believe. However first year students are required to pay the 10k Dollar misc feee upon enrollment. They do not allow installments (atleast in UE) and probably in other schools too, but UE wont allow it period.

If may I add, from personal experience, UERM is not as golden as people think it may be... Sure it does well on Philippine boards but its because of their students. Again my only concern is that, that donation fee is not going anywhere for its students... atleast in UE. I dont know where our donation fees go... I see no improvements on various things... I mean... its fine for me paying such amount if it goes to the students in some sort indirect way... but what UE does is simple. They get the donation fee and keep it in a bank and await a time in which the exchange rate is high, then they gain more profit. I really wish I know where our money is going... all filams are really wondering where our money is going because we really don't see any of it. Even more sad, is that UE is finding more ways of cheaping out and saving money. I just found out today as I was about to study... that they blocked and covered all electrical outlets in the library... how and where are we supposed to charge our laptops? For a supposedly a good private school, it's really not golden as it was made to be. But im not being biased, when applying please see the schools for yourself.
 

tantrum

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 30, 2005
Messages
439
Reaction score
0
Like most private schools there, they are for-profit schools. There was a period in the 90's when UERM almost closed due to financial problems. It's an ok school to get your degree but the grass is always greener on the other side. Most schools there are the same. Like I said go to UERM or Fatima only if your main consideration is US rotations but don't expect anything extraordinary from any school.
 

jmyph

New Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2009
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Wow this discussion is becoming more interesting. Like tantrum have mentioned, if you are considering US rotation and practicing in the US both UERM and Fatima is a good place to go. With that said, both schools however do require a donation... but now they call it MISC fee. To tell you the truth, its not much of a big deal considering, like it was mentioned earlier, you are paying for a tenth of what you pay for Medical School education in the US. Although there is a slight disadvantage, its still up to the student's discipline and luck to match at their desired residency,

From what Saipan mentioned, is sort of similar through my friend is going through at the moment. Here in UE and in most schools, there is a monthly plan installments of tuition fees. Such that in UE its roughly 90k pesos a semester, is split to several payments of 16k I believe. However first year students are required to pay the 10k Dollar misc feee upon enrollment. They do not allow installments (atleast in UE) and probably in other schools too, but UE wont allow it period.

If may I add, from personal experience, UERM is not as golden as people think it may be... Sure it does well on Philippine boards but its because of their students. Again my only concern is that, that donation fee is not going anywhere for its students... atleast in UE. I dont know where our donation fees go... I see no improvements on various things... I mean... its fine for me paying such amount if it goes to the students in some sort indirect way... but what UE does is simple. They get the donation fee and keep it in a bank and await a time in which the exchange rate is high, then they gain more profit. I really wish I know where our money is going... all filams are really wondering where our money is going because we really don't see any of it. Even more sad, is that UE is finding more ways of cheaping out and saving money. I just found out today as I was about to study... that they blocked and covered all electrical outlets in the library... how and where are we supposed to charge our laptops? For a supposedly a good private school, it's really not golden as it was made to be. But im not being biased, when applying please see the schools for yourself.


Maybe I have been away too long. Saipan and Tantrum’s arguments make sense. However, there are also other factors to consider. For Filams who prefer to be around their peers, then they will gravitate towards schools with a larger population of Filams which are Fatima, UE and UST. Networking both in school and post med school is also an important consideration which will again favor said schools.

If you lived in the Philippines, can speak tagalog and can relate well with the locals, then the other schools mentioned like MCU, DLSU, Cebu medical schools are all viable options. They also have filam students but not as many as Fatima and UE. I have colleagues who are graduates of all these schools and all are as competent as the next US med grads, both DO or MDs.

With regards to your problems with UE, I supposed you have a student organization and if you feel you are being short changed, then you have to bring this up to the school administration and the dean specifically. You can write a letter of appeal signed by majority or all of the students. As they say, the squeaky wheel gets the oil. If you don’t complain then nothing will be done.
 

edgeofmyseat

New Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Sorry this is sort of getting away from the topic. But can you tell me if UERM lets you take a semester off to take the USMLE? Or would you have to be set back a whole year? In valuemd, there was a Fatima student who said a lot of her Fil-Am classmates took a semester off there to take the exam.

And, anybody know the refund policies at UERM for that 10k? What if you transfer later on?
 

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Sorry this is sort of getting away from the topic. But can you tell me if UERM lets you take a semester off to take the USMLE? Or would you have to be set back a whole year? In valuemd, there was a Fatima student who said a lot of her Fil-Am classmates took a semester off there to take the exam.

And, anybody know the refund policies at UERM for that 10k? What if you transfer later on?

For UE if you take a semester off, you take the whole year off. Taking a semester off mean you are going Leave of Absence of LOA and if so, you cannot attend until next semester. :smuggrin: And as for the 10k once you pay it, theres no refund. It's nonrefundable.
 

edgeofmyseat

New Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Thanks Medic101. Non refundable.. Yikes!!!
Also, I had another question. UERM has a lot of requirements for applying, like for example your transcripts need to be authenticated by the Phil. Embassy. That was a hassle for me since I was already in Manila when I found that out and had to ask friends and relatives to help.

What about the Police Clearance requirement. They want me to submit a police clearance from the city I went to college in, which is in San Diego, CA. Seems kind of silly to me, since the last time I was in San Diego was in 2002. Is that pretty easy to get? What do I do? Just call the Police Department in the city I lived in? Is there a way to get this requirement waived?
If anyone has any advice on this, I'd really appreciate it. THANKS!!!
 

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Thanks Medic101. Non refundable.. Yikes!!!
Also, I had another question. UERM has a lot of requirements for applying, like for example your transcripts need to be authenticated by the Phil. Embassy. That was a hassle for me since I was already in Manila when I found that out and had to ask friends and relatives to help.

What about the Police Clearance requirement. They want me to submit a police clearance from the city I went to college in, which is in San Diego, CA. Seems kind of silly to me, since the last time I was in San Diego was in 2002. Is that pretty easy to get? What do I do? Just call the Police Department in the city I lived in? Is there a way to get this requirement waived?
If anyone has any advice on this, I'd really appreciate it. THANKS!!!

Part of CHED requirement, since you did attend college there they might ask of it from you but i am not 100% sure. In Cali I believe its a lot easier to obtain one, however I am not from there so I'm not sure. You could always contact Imelda Reyes for every questions you may have. I won't be back until 2 weeks. It's 4th Exam for us. Good luck.
 

bodjiebodjie

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2008
Messages
76
Reaction score
1
If you can speak Tagalog well, by all means avoid those schools that will not waive donation fee. Aside from DLSU, inquire with MCU (Manila Central University), FEU, or even San Beda. Even AUF (Angeles) might be willing to waive the foreign fee.

If you like to live the simple life, it's not bad practicing in the Philippines. Contrary to popular belief, the shortage of doctors happen in remote rural areas. Most cities even in the provinces are saturated with specialists. The doctor to nursing phenomenon is ending as even nurses can't get a visa due to retrogression. There is an oversupply of nurses nowadays and many are PAYING just to get volunteer experience (now, that's a bigger scam). Guess what is the most common pre-med course nowadays?, NURSING. So I guess in a few years many med school will fill their quota with unemployed nurses.
If you want to serve, try working for 2 years there and you will recognize the frustration of doctors in dealing with the lack of any healthcare system.

I agree to what tantrum said about Nursing as the most common pre-med. It is true that the shift from MD to RN is now in reverse mode because of the retrogression. Nowadays, RNs who pass the Philippine Nursing Exams don't get jobs easily because of the FREAKING OVERSUPPLY of nurses (to think that people take up nursing for the Benjamins and a better life). Because of that, nurses now opt to pursue post-graduate studies, and one of them is Medicine. Nursing has its good perks in Med, given that Nurses have a big advantage in clinical practice than other allied health courses.

I'm a student of UERM and I have seen a lot of nurses taking up Med, and are on a roll with good grades, not to mention clinical mastery.

@jryan21: It's best to serve the Filipino people if you don't mind about working here. The Philippines needs more MDs in the rural areas because most MDs (more likely the specialists) work in the urban areas because of the money and the competitive lifestyle. The rural folk need MDs who are competent and willing to serve the barrio. :)
 

eggymd

New Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2009
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
I suggest not staying at Keystone Apartelle. They have too many problems with management and their employees. The turnover rate of their employees is quite high, and that would effect the safety of the building in my opinion. It's too much of a hassle dealing with their management flaws plus medical school. You would only get frustrated. The management sets out policies that they themselves do not abide by or turns a blind eye to when residents violate these policies. It's your call really, but I highly suggest any of the other residences near UERM (Mezza, Anglo, Robbinsdale) for your own sanity during the hectic years of medical school!
 

LocutusofBorg

Asklepian Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
May 28, 2005
Messages
150
Reaction score
5
Saipan's right in one sense. There is no sense in paying more when you can get the same for less. All filipino schools offer basically the same education in 2 flavors, PBL and traditional. PBL gives more time to study for the USMLE but its ONLY APPROPRIATE FOR THE INCREDIBLY BRILLIANT OR THOSE WITH A DEGREE IN A PARAMEDICAL FIELD. I can't over-emphasize this, that if all you've got is a US premed under your belt, PBL will be a poor system of education for you. On the other hand traditional, while leaving little time for the USMLE, will give you a solid foundation in medicine which will make your later studies for the USMLE easier.

So given the overall similarity between programs (within traditional and within PBL), a school the charges less is a smart move.

On the other hand, I disagree with Saipan in his negative opinion of schools charging foreign fees. Running a school is a business, and more so when you're producing doctors for other nations, and not your own. All filipino schools are extremely competitive pricewise, compared to just about any other country in the world. If supply/demand dynamics allow a school to charge fil-ams more, thats business - not deceit.

As far as UERM goes, I looked into this school twice. First time when I came to the philippines, but I found that Cebu schools gave me the same deal at a far lower price (with less pollution/crime to boot). The second time was when i had to take a year off for health reasons, and it became necessary for me to consider schools that have agreements for US clerkships. In this case, Fatima wins out because in addition to US-based clerkships they assist students in scheduling so that they can prepare and pass the USMLE after the 2nd year of medicine. UERM doesn't do that.

So while UERM is a good school, I really liked the administration there, and I like their location as well - its sort of between categories... not cheap enough to be a good native value, and not foreigner friendly enough to compete with the other overpriced option (Fatima).

But its my firm opinion that filipino options TRUMP the carribean ones, hands down. And all foreign options suck compared to being able to attend in the US....
 

USTRPhMD

New Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2010
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Good afternoon everyone. I'm new to the forum and the understanding of taking up medicine in the philippines. I am a Fil-Am from Florida but studied in UST for my Pharmacy Degree and am now looking into a medical school. My only real choices are UST and UE (because of where I stay).

UST was my first choice, but after reading his forum, UE is very attractive because of their aid with US rotations.

My question is if it would be that hard to find a US rotation if graduating from UST? I'm fairly new to all this. Thank you so much.
 

tantrum

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 30, 2005
Messages
439
Reaction score
0
Good afternoon everyone. I'm new to the forum and the understanding of taking up medicine in the philippines. I am a Fil-Am from Florida but studied in UST for my Pharmacy Degree and am now looking into a medical school. My only real choices are UST and UE (because of where I stay).

UST was my first choice, but after reading his forum, UE is very attractive because of their aid with US rotations.

My question is if it would be that hard to find a US rotation if graduating from UST? I'm fairly new to all this. Thank you so much.
UST is a great school and might be a better fit for you since you had your undergrad there. I think in UST you are only allowed 3 months outside rotation but those are difficult to schedule as they have a tight schedule and you have to arrange them on your own. Just reevaluate your priorities.
 

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
As a student of UE, I have several information that potential students or prospective students going to UE should definitely know about.

As of yet, there is NO FAFSA in UE. They are STILL not approved yet, even if they say they're going to be... I know a classmate who had issues with them about this.

Most fil-ams are wondering where our money is going... as I mentioned above, in the very beginning.

They change their policy "too" often. What does that mean? This year I know several people who filed for Leave of Absence for various reasons. The school recommended to pay by installments so if you need to leave for some reason, you need not pay the whole tuition. Many students did this, however when it came to getting the LOA signed by the dean, they were forced to pay the whole semester's tuition and threatened them(unofficial withdrawal). They were willing to officially sign you up for LOA only if one pays for the whole thing. The admin feels so corrupt as of late and many have been fed with lies. even teachers didn't know about "having to pay for the whole tuition to file for LOA"

The latest BS we've gotten is that, rotation position for everyone in the US is no longer secured. yea that's right, they now only allow 10 people to rotate. This is quite annoying considering there is about 30 filams/foreigners in UE this year and 35+ upcoming students next year. False advertisements is really beginning to piss me off...

Its sad considering many of the teachers are really good.
 

mrsdoubtfire

New Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2010
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
hey medic 101,
thanks for your posts. I happen to talk to ms. delos reyes today about applying to uerm. first thing she mentioned was US clinical rotations for a maximum of 8 months. She said that they have accepted 50 US/Fil-Ams as of today. As a fil-am, she said that it is my privilege to do clinicals in the US. That was really encouraging because that's the only reason why I want to go to UE.

my question now: Is that their policy to just limit it to 10 students? Meaning, there's no guarantee to do US clinicals?
 

RheaA

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2009
Messages
15
Reaction score
0
hey medic 101,
thanks for your posts. I happen to talk to ms. delos reyes today about applying to uerm. first thing she mentioned was US clinical rotations for a maximum of 8 months. She said that they have accepted 50 US/Fil-Ams as of today. As a fil-am, she said that it is my privilege to do clinicals in the US. That was really encouraging because that's the only reason why I want to go to UE.

my question now: Is that their policy to just limit it to 10 students? Meaning, there's no guarantee to do US clinicals?
I was told that it depends if you have the grades to do a U.S. rotation. Are planning to do your residency in the U.S.? If so, it is best to take the opportunity to do part of your fourth year clinical rotation in the school that will be applying to as your residency program. For example: if you you want to do your residency at UCLA, then you should do your 4th year clerkship there. Many schools/programs will accept those who are willing to visit their school during their 4th year, given that you meet their criteria. As for UERM's U.S. clinical rotation, keep in mind that the school that they speak of, St. John's Episcopal Hospital in New York, is a D.O. program, not M.D.
Good luck :)
 

mrsdoubtfire

New Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2010
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
I was told that it depends if you have the grades to do a U.S. rotation. Are planning to do your residency in the U.S.? If so, it is best to take the opportunity to do part of your fourth year clinical rotation in the school that will be applying to as your residency program. For example: if you you want to do your residency at UCLA, then you should do your 4th year clerkship there. Many schools/programs will accept those who are willing to visit their school during their 4th year, given that you meet their criteria. As for UERM's U.S. clinical rotation, keep in mind that the school that they speak of, St. John's Episcopal Hospital in New York, is a D.O. program, not M.D.
Good luck :)


Thanks RheaA!

I intend to come back here in CA after medical school in RP.

From what I was told by the registrar, if I were to enroll at UERM, I will do US rotations. Ms delos Santos said that If I were a Filipino citizen, then, I have to belong to the upper 20% of the class to do US clerkship. Perhaps this is what you were trying to imply.

Although my question was never answered. Has there been a change made by UERM with regard to their policy of sending US citizens to 4th year clerkships in the US? Per Medic101, the school now is saying something like they (US citizens/Filams) will not be guaranteed to do US rotations...or something to that effect. And that Medic101 is pissed by false advertisement. Are we guaranteed to do US clerkship as arranged by UE or not? If not, are we allowed to do US clerkship if we were to do all the legwork and apply for clerkship abroad?

With regards to the example you made, the US has residency matching program. Therefore, it is not guaranteed that if I want to do my residency at UCLA, then I should apply for clinical clerkship with them.

Oh and I checked St. John's episcopal, they have both DO and MD programs. Would be nice to go back to NY if I were to do clinicals there.
 

RheaA

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2009
Messages
15
Reaction score
0
Thanks RheaA!

I intend to come back here in CA after medical school in RP.

From what I was told by the registrar, if I were to enroll at UERM, I will do US rotations. Ms delos Santos said that If I were a Filipino citizen, then, I have to belong to the upper 20% of the class to do US clerkship. Perhaps this is what you were trying to imply.

Although my question was never answered. Has there been a change made by UERM with regard to their policy of sending US citizens to 4th year clerkships in the US? Per Medic101, the school now is saying something like they (US citizens/Filams) will not be guaranteed to do US rotations...or something to that effect. And that Medic101 is pissed by false advertisement. Are we guaranteed to do US clerkship as arranged by UE or not? If not, are we allowed to do US clerkship if we were to do all the legwork and apply for clerkship abroad?

With regards to the example you made, the US has residency matching program. Therefore, it is not guaranteed that if I want to do my residency at UCLA, then I should apply for clinical clerkship with them.

Oh and I checked St. John's episcopal, they have both DO and MD programs. Would be nice to go back to NY if I were to do clinicals there.
No worries.
Where from CA are you? I'm from Stockton, CA (30 minutes south of Sacramento).
I don't have any more information about the clerkship. I think it's best to obtain high scores from the beginning so that when 3rd/4th year comes, we will have more options as far as where we can do our clinical rotations.
You have a good point with the residency matching program. I don't know much about the matching process yet.
And, that's interesting about St. John's Episcopal Hospital. I did not see M.D. as one of their residency program... I must not have looked hard enough.
Thank you!!
 

mrsdoubtfire

New Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2010
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
No worries.
Where from CA are you? I'm from Stockton, CA (30 minutes south of Sacramento).
I don't have any more information about the clerkship. I think it's best to obtain high scores from the beginning so that when 3rd/4th year comes, we will have more options as far as where we can do our clinical rotations.
You have a good point with the residency matching program. I don't know much about the matching process yet.
And, that's interesting about St. John's Episcopal Hospital. I did not see M.D. as one of their residency program... I must not have looked hard enough.
Thank you!!


I live in the bay area. I anticipate to be in the PI by last week of May to start med school at UERM. I hope that I'm making a good decision based on what I know now re: med schools in the philippines.

I've seriously thought about the caribbean schools, but after reading a lot of posts about them, i think the PI is still my best bet.
 

RKNY

New Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2006
Messages
24
Reaction score
0
I live in the bay area. I anticipate to be in the PI by last week of May to start med school at UERM. I hope that I'm making a good decision based on what I know now re: med schools in the philippines.

I've seriously thought about the caribbean schools, but after reading a lot of posts about them, i think the PI is still my best bet.

I hope you did more than seriously think if you're choosing between going to medical school in the Philippines and the Caribbean like visit both. Usually the order of priority is US M.D., U.S. D.O., Caribbean, then foreign unless there's any unusual circumstances (like your mother going to this school or your family living in a diff. country).

With that said, a lot of these schools are definitely fil-am/foreigner friendly but won't be preparing you to take your medical boards. You'll instead learn medicine that is geared more towards passing the PI boards which is not necessarily a bad thing, but the questions on your exams will be much much different compared to questions you will take on Step 1.

A lot of hospitals are now requiring Step 1 to be taken (and passed) before you can even step foot in their hospital for clerkship training. Would UERM let you take Step 1 after your second year and not be delayed and graduate in four years? Or would you not mind taking Step 1 right after your fourth year? If after four years, you will have to prep for Step 1 and that will take a couple months because some of the information that you studied from your first two years will definitely be forgotten. This couple months could be critical because the longer you delay taking step 1, the longer you're going to delay taking Step 2, Step 2 CK, and Step 3 and ultimately you're going to be delaying your residency match. So in essence, there may be a chance for you to get into residency in five years. Happening to a couple of classmates that are finished where I am.

The timeline for most caribbean schools is that the basic sciences are taught for a total of 1 1/2 years (no semester breaks, or very short). The other 6 months they will send you back to the states to prep you for Step 1. From then on you'll be able to go to clerkship and internship training that is all U.S. based. Third year you're still hitting the books at UERM for the most part but I'm sure you knew that.

I'm just pointing one thing out but there's a whole plethora of factors to consider before making the right choice that is best for you. A good piece of advice that I got from this board was to "choose the medical school that best accommodates you if you're going foreign" (I'll give give that credit to Saipan). Because truth is, it is different (culture, teaching, examination) and it is going to take a lot of adjustment and I wouldn't want you to be in a situation where you felt that you made the wrong decision.

All in all, if you do choose to go to UERM or your heart is set already then no doubt UERM will teach you to become a great doctor if you work hard and hit the books. Otherwise, you'll have to consider other factors such as living in a third world country, being far away from home, expenses (if money is playing a role), and the timeline about your board exams as well as many other factors. If there are any questions, just ask! =)
 

tantrum

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 30, 2005
Messages
439
Reaction score
0
Just a quick note on Caribbean schools. 2 years ago, I was able to convince a student (Fil-Am) to go to SGU instead of UP. For some miraculous reason (possibly parental connections :laugh:) she was admitted to UP. But that student really wants to go for surgery and seems to be a good student who just missed on being admitted in a US school. In the next few years those issues will be solved as they are opening many med school in the US in the next few years.
If a student is a gunner and would not be happy except for surgery (or other competitive filed), some schools in the Caribbean makes more sense. Just look at the matches for SGU, Ross, Saba, AUC. For that particular student, cost was not an issue as her family can easily support her.
 

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
hey medic 101,
thanks for your posts. I happen to talk to ms. delos reyes today about applying to uerm. first thing she mentioned was US clinical rotations for a maximum of 8 months. She said that they have accepted 50 US/Fil-Ams as of today. As a fil-am, she said that it is my privilege to do clinicals in the US. That was really encouraging because that's the only reason why I want to go to UE.

my question now: Is that their policy to just limit it to 10 students? Meaning, there's no guarantee to do US clinicals?

As it was stated, it does depend on your grade, but you have to consider the fact that you are now competing against your whole batch filams and locals included. Yea I think its the top 10 who wants to do a US rotation. As far as I know, and I suggest you talk to AIMS which is the association for intrnl med stud here at UE regarding this problem. It is a well known fact and I'm a little disappointed at Ms. De Los Reyes for not informing you guys about that problem.

I'm not saying I dislike UERM, but I will tell you to choose carefully and know all the pro and cons of the school. You can't really just go by what the admin tells you. You are entering Philippines. The Icing maybe made beautiful in the outside but the inside could be completely different. Did you guys visit the school yet and actually toured the place? Or did you just read every forum pertaining to Phil Med Schools and inquired via phone?

From my own personal experiences, there is a lot to take in first couple of months. The school is quite small, you're crammed in for the most part, with 127+ students, and the lab materials are... sad to admit... very outdated. However many (not all) of the teachers are quite good, but it doesn't necessarily mean it'll be easy. Its the best teachers that are considered the hardest.

I SUGGEST... to see the schools you applied to and to find out all about it, not just from admins but from students as well. I recommend that you sit IN during a class to optimize your experience. Remember you have 10,000 dollars for a foreign misc fee and its not refundable. This is the school you are staying at for awhile.

Rhea, many people who wish to do Residency in California will have a huge handicap going to a Philippine medical school. I assume you read about this though? From what I know so far, California REQUIRES at least 2 years of clinical experience (USCE) and UE along with all the medical schools int he PHilippines only has at max - 1 year of allowed rotation in the US. This of course post a problem. I dont plan on doing my residency in Cali so I didn't look hard into it. But I know many of my classmates are from the West coast and I was told about this situation. If I am wrong about this, please correct me.

Sorry I took so long to respond mrsdoubtfire but as you may know, its finals month for us and it's quite hectic. FEEL free to PM me if you have anymore questions.

From my own experience I will give you a wonderful advice. Residency programs in the US does not know the difference between UERM, UST, Fatima, FEU, other than the fact that they are all Foreign Medical Schools. Therefore, attending a foreign medical school, you put yourself in a handicapped position. Your requirements and credentials must shine to compete for US residency and thatUS med students already have an edge over you. UST, UERM, etc and many of the other schools in the Philippines are competing against each other. Their system of teaching revolves around the Philippine Medical Boards, NOT the USMLE. Once you take your first exam, you will notice that their questions are set and asked to better prepare you for the Philippine Boards. The foreign students make up only a fraction in a class full of locals. Therefore, though they will cater you and teach in English, if you don't know tagalog, their main focus is for students to ace the Philippine Boards. Every year they compete and boast about their success in terms of passing rate. This is how it is in the Philippines and how school gets its fame from. SO it is understandable why they take it seriously. Where am I getting at? Basically you are left to study and prepare for the USMLE on your own. I'm not saying what you're learning in class is useless, because it IS DEFINITELY NOT. What they will teach you is great for your foundation as a medical student. However, your goal is different than most of your classmates: USMLE and US Residency. Many of the schools in the Philippines ARE CAPABLE of turning you into a great medical student/doctor if not all of them. In the end, it all depends on you as the student to utilize what they have to offer. Just make sure to not further handicap yourself when choosing a school to go to. Don't listen to people saying this school sucks or this school is great etc. Everyone has their own opinion. So I implore you to look at your goals and what outcome you want, and work around it... and choose the best choice that will NOT further handicap you.

I got into UST, UERM and several schools in the Philippines when I applied. My mistake was that I didnt look at the schools before I attended. UST is pretty nice and has a beautiful campus and pretty good facilities. UERM... small and outdated. Yet I chose UE because it created far less handicap for me. UST will give you no time to prepare for the USMLE... or so I heard. But then again, from my own experience, I as well as many of the filams don't even have enough time to prepare for the USMLE at UERM. Traditional base requires a lot of time from its students. Although some post may show that one school is golden over the other, it is a matter of opinion. In the end, what matters is your own opinion and what you want out of it. Don't make any regrets and I implore you to visit each school and give each school a chance/ consideration. Visit the school and find out. I found out the hard way that things are not as promise and in UERM, is no exception.

Though this is a negative indeed, just makes me determined to do even better. Hope that helped.
 
Last edited:

RKNY

New Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2006
Messages
24
Reaction score
0
great post, i agree 100%.
 

tantrum

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 30, 2005
Messages
439
Reaction score
0
I agree that any school that is on traditional track won't give you enough time to prepare for Step 1 after your 2nd year.
I also agree that UST has better facilities (only St. Luke's has a better one). The only warning from me is that UST and other older schools like FEU are very tough schools. Mortality tends to be higher in those schools and the students are more competitive. Just do your best and try to find a group that can boost your confidence.
 

ahoyhoy

New Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2010
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
.... I chose UERM!!!

'any of yous' had sort of plan in loaning your tuition for those who came from the state's. i know UE cant borrow from stafford loan since theyre not listed, so what's the other way around. anyone had asked sallie mae before?

i thought about going to fatima because of stafford loan, but u.e is a very convenient place for me: its just a tricycle away from where i lived in manila.

also, is it possible for me to apply in uerm even though ill be taking the nmat in april, so ye, its already late.do u think they might be able to push it because of that donation money...hehehe
 
Last edited:

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
'any of yous' had sort of plan in loaning your tuition for those who came from the state's. i know UE cant borrow from stafford loan since theyre not listed, so what's the other way around. anyone had asked sallie mae before?

i thought about going to fatima because of stafford loan, but u.e is a very convenient place for me: its just a tricycle away from where i lived in manila.

also, is it possible for me to apply in uerm even though ill be taking the nmat in april, so ye, its already late.do u think they might be able to push it because of that donation money...hehehe

Forget about Stafford Loan from UE for now. Sallie Mae is a no go, I tried everything and still didn't get any. Sallie Mae as well as other loaning agencies now require the school to have Title 4. Back then, it was quite easy to get a grad school loan but due to the recession presumably, it got tougher with their requirements. Honestly I knew people who took the NMAT April and got into UE. The test isnt a problem as long as you do well on it... The problem is that, you may be out of luck. UE has about 50 foreign/filam students already, and they only have a certain limited slots. I suggest you call and find out about your chances.

BTW - just like Tantrum mentioned, UST is a good school, but has high mortality rate and a tough chance to parallel study. Definitely USMLE limiting.
 

ahoyhoy

New Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2010
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Forget about Stafford Loan from UE for now. Sallie Mae is a no go, I tried everything and still didn't get any. Sallie Mae as well as other loaning agencies now require the school to have Title 4. Back then, it was quite easy to get a grad school loan but due to the recession presumably, it got tougher with their requirements. Honestly I knew people who took the NMAT April and got into UE. The test isnt a problem as long as you do well on it... The problem is that, you may be out of luck. UE has about 50 foreign/filam students already, and they only have a certain limited slots. I suggest you call and find out about your chances.

BTW - just like Tantrum mentioned, UST is a good school, but has high mortality rate and a tough chance to parallel study. Definitely USMLE limiting.

thanks! actually, i have an aunt that teaches anesthesiology at ust but then i didnt wanna go there because of what i read here:laugh: i told my father not to tell her yet till i successfully applied to fatima or ue :laugh:
 

mrsdoubtfire

New Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2010
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
As it was stated, it does depend on your grade, but you have to consider the fact that you are now competing against your whole batch filams and locals included. Yea I think its the top 10 who wants to do a US rotation. As far as I know, and I suggest you talk to AIMS which is the association for intrnl med stud here at UE regarding this problem. It is a well known fact and I'm a little disappointed at Ms. De Los Reyes for not informing you guys about that problem.

I'm not saying I dislike UERM, but I will tell you to choose carefully and know all the pro and cons of the school. You can't really just go by what the admin tells you. You are entering Philippines. The Icing maybe made beautiful in the outside but the inside could be completely different. Did you guys visit the school yet and actually toured the place? Or did you just read every forum pertaining to Phil Med Schools and inquired via phone?

From my own personal experiences, there is a lot to take in first couple of months. The school is quite small, you're crammed in for the most part, with 127+ students, and the lab materials are... sad to admit... very outdated. However many (not all) of the teachers are quite good, but it doesn't necessarily mean it'll be easy. Its the best teachers that are considered the hardest.

I SUGGEST... to see the schools you applied to and to find out all about it, not just from admins but from students as well. I recommend that you sit IN during a class to optimize your experience. Remember you have 10,000 dollars for a foreign misc fee and its not refundable. This is the school you are staying at for awhile.

Rhea, many people who wish to do Residency in California will have a huge handicap going to a Philippine medical school. I assume you read about this though? From what I know so far, California REQUIRES at least 2 years of clinical experience (USCE) and UE along with all the medical schools int he PHilippines only has at max - 1 year of allowed rotation in the US. This of course post a problem. I dont plan on doing my residency in Cali so I didn't look hard into it. But I know many of my classmates are from the West coast and I was told about this situation. If I am wrong about this, please correct me.

Sorry I took so long to respond mrsdoubtfire but as you may know, its finals month for us and it's quite hectic. FEEL free to PM me if you have anymore questions.

From my own experience I will give you a wonderful advice. Residency programs in the US does not know the difference between UERM, UST, Fatima, FEU, other than the fact that they are all Foreign Medical Schools. Therefore, attending a foreign medical school, you put yourself in a handicapped position. Your requirements and credentials must shine to compete for US residency and thatUS med students already have an edge over you. UST, UERM, etc and many of the other schools in the Philippines are competing against each other. Their system of teaching revolves around the Philippine Medical Boards, NOT the USMLE. Once you take your first exam, you will notice that their questions are set and asked to better prepare you for the Philippine Boards. The foreign students make up only a fraction in a class full of locals. Therefore, though they will cater you and teach in English, if you don't know tagalog, their main focus is for students to ace the Philippine Boards. Every year they compete and boast about their success in terms of passing rate. This is how it is in the Philippines and how school gets its fame from. SO it is understandable why they take it seriously. Where am I getting at? Basically you are left to study and prepare for the USMLE on your own. I'm not saying what you're learning in class is useless, because it IS DEFINITELY NOT. What they will teach you is great for your foundation as a medical student. However, your goal is different than most of your classmates: USMLE and US Residency. Many of the schools in the Philippines ARE CAPABLE of turning you into a great medical student/doctor if not all of them. In the end, it all depends on you as the student to utilize what they have to offer. Just make sure to not further handicap yourself when choosing a school to go to. Don't listen to people saying this school sucks or this school is great etc. Everyone has their own opinion. So I implore you to look at your goals and what outcome you want, and work around it... and choose the best choice that will NOT further handicap you.

I got into UST, UERM and several schools in the Philippines when I applied. My mistake was that I didnt look at the schools before I attended. UST is pretty nice and has a beautiful campus and pretty good facilities. UERM... small and outdated. Yet I chose UE because it created far less handicap for me. UST will give you no time to prepare for the USMLE... or so I heard. But then again, from my own experience, I as well as many of the filams don't even have enough time to prepare for the USMLE at UERM. Traditional base requires a lot of time from its students. Although some post may show that one school is golden over the other, it is a matter of opinion. In the end, what matters is your own opinion and what you want out of it. Don't make any regrets and I implore you to visit each school and give each school a chance/ consideration. Visit the school and find out. I found out the hard way that things are not as promise and in UERM, is no exception.

Though this is a negative indeed, just makes me determined to do even better. Hope that helped.


There's just so many things to think about.

But you know what, Medic 101? I've been to UE in September 2009 just to see the campus. It was not impressive at all. But the only reason why I chose to apply to UE was their US clinicals. Now, based on your statements regarding this, I should look into other schools. Unfortunately, being a non-traditional student (I'm older than most of med school applicants), I can't get into FEU. De La Salle would take me in probably. I have visited those 2 schools too and I am most impressed with the facilities of DLSU in Cavite.

Thank you for your insights.
 

Medic101

Full Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
There's just so many things to think about.

But you know what, Medic 101? I've been to UE in September 2009 just to see the campus. It was not impressive at all. But the only reason why I chose to apply to UE was their US clinicals. Now, based on your statements regarding this, I should look into other schools. Unfortunately, being a non-traditional student (I'm older than most of med school applicants), I can't get into FEU. De La Salle would take me in probably. I have visited those 2 schools too and I am most impressed with the facilities of DLSU in Cavite.

Thank you for your insights.


If you need anymore help, please feel free to PM me.
 

pepci

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
I am wondering how many of you guys who posted in here have already taken the STEPS. I know several grads of Cebu schools (CIM mostly, some Cebu Doc) who are doing their residencies in several NY hospitals. Most of them got pretty decent step 1 and step 2 scores. I know two that have scored 99 and 98 in step 1 and 95 in step 2.

There seem to be a lot of hoopla about how different and difficult the USMLEs are compared to the Philippine Boards. While very true, however, those I know who took the steps have done pretty good with only some modest adjustments.
 
Top