Aug 2, 2015
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Hello, I was wondering if Graduate schools such as Med, Dentistry, and Nursing prefer whether you are in UC or not. I haven't figured out what i exactly what to be, but i'm learning more towards being a Doctor, or a Nurse. As a high school senior i'm not confident that I can get into a UC.
  • If i don't get accepted in a UC, will applying for a graduate school as a CSU student affect my chances of getting in a Graduate school?
  • Would I be able to transfer to a UC (preferably UC Davis) from a CSU? I heard that UC's prefer transfer applicants that are applying from community than CSU students.
 

WedgeDawg

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Go to whatever 4-year institution you think you'll do best in. UCLA is a fairly prestigious school, yet they only get 53% of their applicants into med school each year.
 
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ZedsDed

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Hello, I was wondering if Graduate schools such as Med, Dentistry, and Nursing prefer whether you are in UC or not. I haven't figured out what i exactly what to be, but i'm learning more towards being a Doctor, or a Nurse. As a high school senior i'm not confident that I can get into a UC.
  • If i don't get accepted in a UC, will applying for a graduate school as a CSU student affect my chances of getting in a Graduate school?
  • Would I be able to transfer to a UC (preferably UC Davis) from a CSU? I heard that UC's prefer transfer applicants that are applying from community than CSU students.
Graduate schools and professional schools are not the same thing. You have plenty of time to learn about all of these different careers (and yes, they are all very different) in college. Go to whatever UC you think you can do well in. Plenty of UCD students get into med school every year. UCM is considered by most to be the easiest UC to get into. Try and make yourself, at a minimum, a student of the caliber described in this link: http://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/campuses/merced/freshman-profile/
Here's Davis:
http://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/campuses/davis/freshman-profile/

Frankly, the CSU's produce such a ridiculously small number of applicants each year that I don't think it's in your best interest to attend one. Especially if your goal is to succeed in a hyper-competitive process. In fact, I would suggest CC--> UC before I would suggest four years at a CSU.
 
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md-2020

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Go to whatever 4-year institution you think you'll do best in. UCLA is a fairly prestigious school, yet they only get 53% of their applicants into med school each year.
Yea that's cause they're a massive behemoth of a public school.
 
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Mar 1, 2015
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Go to the school you think you will do the best in. It's better to go to a low ranked university and get a 3.8 than go to a top 10 and get a 3.1. The pre-req's are mostly the same for doctor + nurse so you're ok there. Do you know what kind of nurse you want to be?
 
OP
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Aug 2, 2015
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Go to the school you think you will do the best in. It's better to go to a low ranked university and get a 3.8 than go to a top 10 and get a 3.1. The pre-req's are mostly the same for doctor + nurse so you're ok there. Do you know what kind of nurse you want to be?
As of right now, RN or Nurse practitioner.
 

doc05

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Go to the school you think you will do the best in. It's better to go to a low ranked university and get a 3.8 than go to a top 10 and get a 3.1. The pre-req's are mostly the same for doctor + nurse so you're ok there. Do you know what kind of nurse you want to be?
actually, pre-reqs for medicine are not the same as nursing, as academic rigor is very different. I hope you knew that already.
 
Mar 1, 2015
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As of right now, RN or Nurse practitioner.
RN is much easier to attain than NP.
RN = Requires Bachelor's of Nursing
NP = Requires Master's of Nursing.

Don't forget about the licensing exams that nurses have to take.

NP's are more like Doctor's than RN's, and NP's require more schooling.
 
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JustintheDoctor

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RN is much easier to attain than NP.
RN = Requires Bachelor's of Nursing
NP = Requires Master's of Nursing.

Don't forget about the licensing exams that nurses have to take.

NP's are more like Doctor's than RN's, and NP's require more schooling.
who cares it's all about the moneyyyyy. If you do end up being an RN, think about becoming an ACNP or CRNA after!
 
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who cares it's all about the moneyyyyy. If you do end up being an RN, think about becoming an ACNP or CRNA after!
Medicine or any other health related career for that matter should not be about the money. The average salary for an RN in 2013 was 68k a year. The average salary for an NP in 2013 was 95k. While being an ACNP or CRNA will give you a decent salary boost, it is more additional training and more debt. You have to do a health career because you want to. You cannot do it for money. If you want money, go to wall street and work as an investment banker.
 

JustintheDoctor

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Medicine or any other health related career for that matter should not be about the money. The average salary for an RN in 2013 was 68k a year. The average salary for an NP in 2013 was 95k. While being an ACNP or CRNA will give you a decent salary boost, it is more additional training and more debt. You have to do a health career because you want to. You cannot do it for money. If you want money, go to wall street and work as an investment banker.
why are you taking it so serious? People do it for the money. If there wasn't good pay, I highly doubt most people would become a doctor/nurse. Also, those numbers depend on where you live too. Was that just the national average? Because here in NYC, I can make 75k starting as an RN and 100k+ for the most basic NP at my local hospital. I guess that's the perks of living next to the #1 trauma center in my area.
Just to add on, people won't put their self 100k+ in debt for college and medschool just to make crap money. Money plays a big role and if you don't believe me go ask around.
One last edit: I do agree though to not go in it JUST for the money, you will be miserable. Go into medicine because you want to, but no need to ignore that the pay is great for different specialties.
 
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Mar 1, 2015
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why are you taking it so serious? People do it for the money. If there wasn't good pay, I highly doubt most people would become a doctor/nurse. Also, those numbers depend on where you live too. Was that just the national average? Because here in NYC, I can make 75k starting as an RN and 100k+ for the most basic NP at my local hospital. I guess that's the perks of living next to the #1 trauma center in my area.
Just to add on, people won't put their self 100k+ in debt for college and medschool just to make crap money. Money plays a big role and if you don't believe me go ask around.
One last edit: I do agree though to not go in it JUST for the money, you will be miserable. Go into medicine because you want to, but no need to ignore that the pay is great for different specialties.
I never said money wasn't a factor at all, just that it should not be the main factor. Rarely do you see a physician making in the 7 figures, (although some Rad onc's do make that much) Some people are in $500,000 in debt after medical school. You have a lot of expenses to cover (Malpractice insurance, rent, food, family etc.) Money is a factor, I never said it wasn't, but it certainly should not be your main/only reason for going into medicine as you mentioned.
 

JustintheDoctor

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I never said money wasn't a factor at all, just that it should not be the main factor. Rarely do you see a physician making in the 7 figures, (although some Rad onc's do make that much) Some people are in $500,000 in debt after medical school. You have a lot of expenses to cover (Malpractice insurance, rent, food, family etc.) Money is a factor, I never said it wasn't, but it certainly should not be your main/only reason for going into medicine.
guess we are in the same boat. But for the OP's sake, if he were to become an RN he should go to school part time and build his way to double his salary.
 

PREDOCSIMP

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Hello, I was wondering if Graduate schools such as Med, Dentistry, and Nursing prefer whether you are in UC or not. I haven't figured out what i exactly what to be, but i'm learning more towards being a Doctor, or a Nurse. As a high school senior i'm not confident that I can get into a UC.
  • If i don't get accepted in a UC, will applying for a graduate school as a CSU student affect my chances of getting in a Graduate school?
  • Would I be able to transfer to a UC (preferably UC Davis) from a CSU? I heard that UC's prefer transfer applicants that are applying from community than CSU students.


Go to the school that you want to go to. As long as it's accredited, then you are fine. Do the best that you can, the rest will follow.
 
OP
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Aug 2, 2015
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Thanks for the reply guys. I did a bit more research, RNs in where i live in California make up to 103k. Is there a difference between nurses and a PA? Like, is one more rigorous than the other?
 
Mar 1, 2015
310
120
Manhattan, New York
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Thanks for the reply guys. I did a bit more research, RNs in where i live in California make up to 103k. Is there a difference between nurses and a PA? Like, is one more rigorous than the other?
RN vs PA = Pretty even in terms of years, but not entirely sure in terms of the actual difficulty of each program.
NP vs PA = NP is harder I believe (5-7 years for NP) vs (3 years for PA)
 
OP
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Aug 2, 2015
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Are there any PA schools in california? I can't seem to find any
 

WedgeDawg

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There is a lot of misinformation in this thread. OP, you need to do a google search about different healthcare practitioners and look at the difference for yourself, because you're not getting very accurate advice here.
 
OP
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Aug 2, 2015
7
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Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
There is a lot of misinformation in this thread. OP, you need to do a google search about different healthcare practitioners and look at the difference for yourself, because you're not getting very accurate advice here.
Thanks for the heads up :)