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Interviewing Tips

Discussion in 'Psychiatry' started by abfab, May 10, 2007.

  1. abfab

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    Seems like my desire to switch specialties and go into Psych may come true be fulfilled after all. I have been invited to interview for a few spots and just wanted to get a feel for what to expect (this being Psychiatry and what not).

    Sorry about the redundancy, but I'd really appreciate folks, especially those switching, remarking about their interview experiences. Thanks!
     
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  3. atsai3

    10+ Year Member

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    Totally depends on the program. Most places I interviewed at had pretty chill interview days, and the questions centered around them trying to get a feel for me and whether I would be a good fit for the program. If you are given the opportunity to ask questions, by all means do so. Seems strange to expect that you might be able to gather enough data in one day to be able to tell if a program is a good fit for you, but you should take every available opportunity to do so.

    Be prepared to talk about why you are switching.

    At one of the programs where I interviewed, one "poor" interview experience (ie., basically if one of the faculty or resident interviewers says "this guy is weird") isn't a red flag. Two poor interactions, however, and you are pretty much automatically removed from consideration.

    -AT.
     
  4. Dramkinola

    Dramkinola Psychiatry Resident
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    One point i have to add is, when interviewing candidates switching from other fields, I've noticed those that verbalized a desire for greater patient interaction (i.e., more than 3-5 minutes talking to a patient) and the recognition that a 15-20 minute conversation with a patient to alleviate their anxiety/concern often times greatly improved their hospital course/health outcome greatly improved their impression on the interviewers.
     
  5. abfab

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    Thanks for the input folks. The bit about spending more time with pts--and how that can make an impression on interviewers--is very useful to know.

    Anyone else?
     

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