Is Emory participating in the match this year?!?!!!11

Discussion in 'Ophthalmology: Eye Physicians & Surgeons' started by deyer, Jan 3, 2009.

  1. deyer

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    I haven't heard even a whisper about Emory on these boards. I was really impressed from a strictly social standpoint (residents are nice, faculty are nice, area seems nice, absolutely zero ego). The facilities weren't the best, but I know they have a really really strong reputation in seemingly every aspect so I know that isn't the problem. I haven't heard anyone say anything about Emory this year, while there seems to be discussion going on about other programs and relative strengths and weaknesses. Anyone want to let me in on the reason, or share some thoughts about the place? The lack of chatter is making me wonder

    Also, the subject line was meant to be sarcastic. I have no reason to believe they are not involved in the match.
     
    #1 deyer, Jan 3, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2009
  2. Pastrami King

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    I have a good friend at Emory. He enjoys the program and the strong education it is giving him.
     
  3. wr100m

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    10-09-2008, 10:19 AM #2 wr100m
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    amazing program
    I could not have been more impressed by Emory when interviewing at thier program. The residents were the most enthusiastic group that I met on the trail who all were loving their training, the balanced exposure, and the interactions with the faculty. The common report is that this is a busy program and that residents will get maximum exposure so that when finishing residency, you will graduate confident and comfortable with anything that walks through your door. You will be well prepared for comp. ophthalmology or to match in any fellowship.

    Strengths of the program included diversity of training. Grady is very high volume, and because it serves many of the uninsured, you see very advanced pathology and get considerable autonomy as a resident. The resources in the Grady eye clinic were good and the support staff is good, and the teaching there is amazing. This hospital produces a lot of trauma call. Additionally, there is a huge VA in town, and that runs like a VA with all the advantages of large operative experience. The residents say the VA clinic is good preparation for a future in private practice - bread and butter stuff seen efficiently. Then there is Emory Univ Hosp which is more the academic practice setting. So this program includes all training settings you could want in one city. Surgical numbers are high, well-balanced, and include extra-cap cataracts and refractive surgery. A senior resident told me that a unique aspect of the surgical training is that residents are trained to correct their own mistakes and that you do not switch chairs with the attending in the OR if you do something wrong, rather attendings talk you through it and reach over when needed.

    The faculty were personable and impressive people. Residents stated that they are great teachers and are easy to work with. There are didactic sessions on Friday mornings. Research opportunities were plentiful, but were not forced upon you. You are expected to read the text books, but the focus of this program is on getting pt care experience and seeing and doing as much as possible, and the test scores are resulting very high.

    A prominant faculty member at Wash U stated that Emory was one of the best 4 programs for residency training - known for great training with happy residents. Every senior resident I talked to got interviews at every fellowship they applied to, and they applied to top notch programs. No one said anything negative. Many saw staying in Atlanta for fellowship as an attractive option. I think it says a lot that of the 6 who matched in the 2008 match, half are from Emory which means that they knew the program very well and wanted to stay there.

    Being the only training program in a city of 4 million gives residents a lot of patients. Living in Atlanta was popular with everyone, and surprisingly, if you live in one of the nice neighborhoods that are between downtown and Decatur, you can drive in to work in about 15 minutes and will be located inbetween the hospitals you'll work in.
    Last edited by wr100m; 10-21-2008 at 12:22 PM.. Reason: typo
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    [​IMG] 10-14-2008, 01:45 PM #3 taehong81





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    I agree with the above post. As a former med student, I know that the residents are really happy with their training at Emory. The program director is down to earth and gives full support for the residents. The eye clinics are always busy and residents gets lots autonomy esp at Grady. There is enough surgeries for all six residents. The residents gets their choice of fellowhip. the class that graduated 2007, corena - emory, retina - emory, retina - Wash U, peds- UCLA, oculoplastic - duke. Would of loved to stay at Emory, but had to leave atlanta because of the Mrs. :)


    Atlanta is a great city for young professionals to live in. affordable and diverse. ​












    [​IMG] 10-24-2008, 09:54 AM #4 wf2bu





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    As a first year resident at Emory, I wanted to chime in on this blog. I agree with most of the above postings. I truly believe that residents at Emory do get a lot of exposure to wide variety of pathology and patients, and we are trained to be very autonomous from the get go. That said, our second years and third years are always available for questions and assistance. ​





    Positives: ​





    Volume: both at grady and va, we see about 70-90 pts daily in clinic as a group; as first years, we get to do lots of YAG capsulotomies, intravitreal Avastin and foscarnet injections, chalazion removals, LIs, and ALTs [2nd half of first year]. As first years, we also get to do the enucleations[avg 2-3 per resident per year]​





    Variety of cases: on a given day at Grady clinic, you just don't know what is going to walk through your doors. We have a ton of immigrants from Central/South America, and Africa that show up at our clinic doors or the ER. As the primary call person at Grady from day 1 [July 1st], we as first years get to start the work up and think about the patient before calling in our 3rd year back up resident. Unfortunately, because our patients are so poor in most cases, the pathology is advanced by the time we see them--> lot of PDR, lots of HIV associated CMV retinitis, occassional ARN/PORN, endophthalmitis, Toxo etc, and of course Trauma galore...


    We also cover grady in patient consult as first years [while working the clinic at the same time, ie. it is not a separate rotation to be just on consult like other programs] and get really interesting ID consults as well as neuroop things. ​





    Autonomy: it is graduated designation of responsibility. By 2nd year, you are the leader of the Grady clinic. You run the show which is a lot of stress but comes with a lot of rewards when you finish the day and know that nothing can really shake you up. ​





    Four totally different hospitals--> Grady for the indigent care, VA hospital [the Atlanta VA eye clinic works like a private clinic with state of the art of equipment and amazing techs], Emory [mostly attendings run the clinic], and Crawford long[a private hospital feel]​





    Faculty: we have a variety of top notch faculty in house. Residents will agree that having Dr. Broocker at Grady is an amazing asset to the program. He has been here for 20 years and is a gem for the program. At grady, we also now have couple of young faculty members that help with clinic which is great as well to have new energy and ideas. At the end of the day, the clinic is managed by the residents. ​






    Negatives: ​





    Volume: as much as i can rave about the amazing volume that we see, at the end of the day, it can get to you day in and day out. We don't finish most days at grady until 6:30 pm or so and there are couple of days a month that we stay in clinic until 8 or 8:30 pm and then you might be on call that same night. Having 6 residents per year helps as we get to split overnight call q6 [it's home call]. ​





    Call: weekend call can be hit or miss and mostly hits with Grady call esp. being brutal some weekends. it's very unpredictable but most of us expect a big chunk of our call weekends to be spent at Grady. that said, you learn a lot on call. ​





    Grady: having a place like Grady is a + and a -. For all the pathology we see, the clinic does not run that efficiently because of the inherent systemic issues with the hospital system. It just takes a lot of time to get a patient through the system. You just have to be there to understand, but I still love working at Grady. Patients are really grateful for your time and work there but it can be frustrating. I am sure residents at other county programs can relate..​





    Overall, I made an excellent choice in ranking Emory high and matching here. I am sure I will be trained well and can pursue a good fellowship if I choose to or go into comprehensive. The camaraderie of the residents with each other is probably my favorite part of being here. On those long days at Grady, we never leave clinic until the last patient is seen and if someone is done early, they help out the rest of the residents. We leave the clinic together every day at Grady and the VA.


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  4. deyer

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    Thanks for the responses guys. I have seen these posts, but it seems like a pretty small amount of chatter about this program, and all of that is from years past (i think). I'd love to hear what anyone from this year thought about the interview days or what they have heard from any current residents candidly. Feel free to privately message me if you are worried about spreading anything around.

    I guess there is not much talk about some of the big places (BP, MEII, Duke, Wills, Wilmer, UCLA, Iowa, etc.(sorry if I lefts some one's fave out)), I assume it is because there is no need for a discussion about them. I know that Emory is ranked very well, like some of those places, but is the lack of talk for the same reason? Is it just assumed that they are good, no need for discussion? I am not suggesting that any program is above reasonable discussion, and I am not trying to be a rank-*****. Just hoping to get some additional info.

    Thanks for any info from anyone.
     

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