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Is there a computer that fits in your pockets...

Discussion in 'Tech: Medical Apps, iOS, Android, medical devices' started by nofear, Apr 20, 2007.

  1. nofear

    nofear Member

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    hey guys i was at a interview um i think this was at univer of pacific in sanfran and they showed us these somewhat mini lap tops that you can fit in your pockets, and you could access the internet easily...anyone know what they are called or where i can get them? i think the guy said they were around a 700 but i am not sure about the price...thanks
     
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  3. 16846

    16846 Guest

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    Look into UMPC (Ultra Mobile PC) or OQO.
     
  4. emeddo

    emeddo OMS

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    We have a few students that use these, the motion computing (www.motioncomputing.com) seems to be popular. The Sony hasn't been getting very good reviews. None of them are even close to the $700 ballpark range though, usually they are greater than $1500. The are really nice though and I can see how incredibly usefull they would be. One of our students just started running Vista on his and it seems to work great. If you have an external monitor/keyboard/mouse/external dvd setup at home you can use it just like a desktop.
     
  5. Kluver Bucy

    Kluver Bucy Gold Member

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    Samsung Q1B Mobile PC (7" WVGA Touch Screen LCD - 512MB, 40GB - Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, Fast Ethernet - NP-Q1BV000) is $785.95 at buy.com:
    http://www.buy.com/prod/samsung-q1b-mobile-pc-7-wvga-touch-screen-lcd-512mb-40gb-bluetooth-wi/q/loc/101/203877498.html
     
  6. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty
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    They are very hit and miss....great idea, still a bit behind on quality control and usability. I'd hold off on them until the next batch. At $1500-$2000, they are still pretty costly (for the nice ones). I don't know much about that one for $800.....if I had some extra cash, I'd check it out, but extra cash + grad student.....usually don't go together.

    As for laptop options.....someone in my class had one of the ultra small sony viao, it isn't pocket size, but seems REALLY nice. Expensive and the quality can vary...but I really like it.

    -t
     
  7. XoQo

    XoQo PGY1 Retractor

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    from the m1/m2 perspective these would be awesome. probably pricier than the mini laptops from sony or dell but a cool form factor.


    for the m3s/m4s --


    i think the key thing to consider is whether or not you'd be able to interface this device with a hospital's electronic medical record. If you could, this would be incredibly useful since you'd be able to chart anywhere instead of hunting for a workstation while PT/OT/nurses/etc take up all the computers

    Some hospitals have pretty draconian policies. I asked once at my own hospital whether it was possible -- and they basically wanted to reimage my machine with their image so that it'd be locked down. I understand their concerns -- but they give attendings and residents RSA fobs for remote citrix access at home. I'm willing to bet that my own machine is more secure than the spectrum of machines they have accessing stuff from off campus.

    As long as a program lets you citrix into their EMR from home, you should in theory be able to use a machine like this in the hospital -- assuming the network guys cooperate and allow access via the internal wireless network. At my institution i ran into a snag here as well -- there is a public wireless network that is locked down completely (port 80 HTTP access only) from which you can't access any of the hospital domains from either (talked to their network guy, it's a matter of their firewall setup...supposedly). They have an internal secure wireless network used for their workstations on wheels -- but the security information to connect is built into the computer images and not available for an individual's use.


    if you can't interface with the EMR -- then you might as well just get a PDA in my opinion since the extra weight wouldn't be worth it.


    Personally i've never used one of these machines before. I wonder how
     

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